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    (CNN)The most distant quasar and the earliest known supermassive black hole have been discovered, shedding light on how massive galaxies formed in the early universe. This discovery was revealed Tuesday at the 237th meeting of The American Astronomical Society, happening virtually due to the pandemic. The study has been accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.A quasar, or quasi-stellar object, is the compact region at the center of a galaxy that throws off enormous energy. They emit so much energy that quasars appear like stars through a telescope. Astronomers believe that the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies actually power quasars, acting like an engine.When gas falls into quasars at the centers of galaxies, they form disks of gas and dust that emit electromagnetic energy. This creates a brightness greater than entire galaxies. Jets shoot out of the quasar, pulsing with X-rays, and they are some of...
    Lurking in a distant region of space, more than 13 billion light years away, is a luminous "quasar" fueled by a supermassive black hole 1.6 billion times more massive than the sun. Astronomers recently spotted the galactic beast, marking the oldest one of its kind.  The ancient quasar, defined as a bright, massive, remote active galactic nucleus emitting huge amounts of energy, has been dubbed J0313-1806 by an international team, led by researchers at the University of Arizona. It dates back to an astounding 670 million years after the Big Bang — when the infant universe was just 5% of its current age.  That makes it the most distant — meaning the earliest — known quasar. The previous record-holding quasar was also recently discovered, in 2017.  J0313-1806 is only 20 million light years farther away than its predecessor, but its supermassive black hole is twice as heavy — challenging known...
    Experts have been left astonished after a supermassive black hole which was thought to be in the middle of a distant galaxy has gone missing. The bright cluster galaxy A2261-BCG appears to have lost its black hole and some scientists think it could now be floating through space. This would be the first ever example of a “recoiling” black hole. It means a powerful force in the galaxy may have ejected the supermassive black hole and sent it somewhere far away. The mystery space event was spotted by researchers from a few universities in North America. Almost every galaxy in the Universe is thought to have a giant black hole at its centre, including our galaxy which is the Milky Way. A team lead by Dr Kayhan Gultekin from the University of Michigan has published a study about recoiling black holes the American Astronomical Society journal. Dr Gultekin had...
    EXPERTS have been left astonished after a supermassive black hole which was thought to be in the middle of a distant galaxy has gone missing. The bright cluster galaxy A2261-BCG appears to have lost its black hole and some scientists think it could now be floating through space. 2Scientists can't find a black hole they thought was in a distant galaxyCredit: Getty Images - Getty This would be the first ever example of a "recoiling" black hole. It means a powerful force in the galaxy may have ejected the supermassive black hole and sent it somewhere far away. The mystery space event was spotted by researchers from a few universities in North America. Almost every galaxy in the Universe is thought to have a giant black hole at its centre, including our galaxy which is the Milky Way. 2It may have been ejected from the galaxy by a giant galactic...
    Some supermassive black holes at the centre of galaxies may actually be wormholes that link two distant parts of the universe together, astrophysicists suggest. In his Theory of General Relativity, Albert Einstein predicted the existence of wormholes, which connect two points in space or time, but they have yet to be discovered.  Now experts from the Central Astronomical Observatory in Russia believe the 'black holes' at the centre of some very bright galaxies (known as the active galactic nuclei or AGNs) could be the entrances to these wormholes. While these wormholes are theoretically 'traversable', meaning spacecraft could travel through them, they are surrounded by intense radiation, meaning humans would be unlikely to survive the journey, even in the most rugged of spacecraft.  Some galaxies have an 'active galactic nuclei' at their centre - a supermassive black hole like phenomenon with twin jets of matter spouting from the accretion disc poles Wormholes and black holes...
    (CNN)Here's a look at the life of renowned theoretical physicist, cosmologist, astronomer and mathematician, Stephen Hawking.PersonalBirth date: January 8, 1942 Death date: March 14, 2018Birth place: Oxford, EnglandRead MoreBirth name: Stephen William HawkingFather: Frank Hawking, research biologistMother: Isobel Hawking Marriages: Elaine Mason (1995-2006, divorced); Jane Wilde (1965-1991, divorced) Children: with Jane Wilde: Timothy, Lucy and Robert Education: Oxford University, B.A., 1962; Cambridge University, Ph.D., 1966 Other FactsHawking was born on the 300th anniversary of astronomer and physicist Galileo Galilei's death (January 8, 1642).Guest-starred, as himself, on "The Big Bang Theory," "Star Trek: The Next Generation" and "The Simpsons."Visited all seven continents, including Antarctica.Lou Gehrig's Disease (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or ALS), is usually fatal after three years. Hawking survived it for 55 years.The disease left him paralyzed and completely dependent on others and/or technology for everything: bathing, dressing, eating, mobility and speech. He was able to move only a few fingers...
    Scientists have expressed their confusion that a presumed black hole that was estimated to be so big that it was characterized as “supermassive” and considered one of the largest known examples of the mysterious space phenomenon in the universe, appears to not exist after all. According to Science Alert, the specific region of space that houses the new scientific mystery is Abell 2261. It is known as a galaxy cluster, i.e. one of the most gravitationally dense regions in the universe. As its namesake would suggest, galaxy clusters are groups of hundreds or even thousands of galaxies that are gravitationally bound to one another. Usually, one particularly large and bright galaxy sits at the center and is known as the “brightest cluster galaxy” or BCG. Abell 2261’s BCG has the largest galactic core known to scientists and its diameter alone is a million light-years — a full ten times the...
    Black Holes May Not Be Black Holes at All. They May Actually Be Fuzzballs. Chadwick Boseman Honored by Robert Downey Jr. and Don Cheadle at the MTV Movie & TV Awards 39 Gifts That Are Selling Like Hotcakes During The Holidays Ad Microsoft Top credit card wipes out interest until 2022 (seriously) Ad Microsoft The 23 Hottest Gifts of 2020 Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/31 SLIDES © Cheapism Gifts with Buzz Coffee snobs are the worst to shop for because...
    HOLTS SUMMIT, Mo. (AP) — A historic Black church in Missouri has been vandalized, leaving its congregation reeling and authorities looking to find out who did it. The Callaway County Sheriff's Office said in a Facebook post that the acts committed at the Mount Vernon Missionary Baptist Church in Holts Summit, Missouri, are “despicable and quite offensive,." Deputies responded to the property at 1:32 a.m. Thursday following an alarm call, the Jefferson City News-Tribune reported. They discovered that both the historic church building and a newer one completed in the early 2000s had been struck by vandals. Photos show what appear to be bullet holes and boot prints on the older building’s front door. Windows are smashed and an air-conditioning unit tipped on its side. Inside there are gaping holes in the walls, pews tipped over, toilets shattered, furniture smashed. Even the blades of the ceiling fans above the sanctuary...
    Nothing in the universe is scarier than a black hole. Black holes – regions in space where gravity is so strong that nothing can escape – are a hot topic in the news these days. 6Anyone unlucky enough to fall into a black hole would die a terrifying death 6 Half of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Roger Penrose for his mathematical work showing that black holes are an inescapable consequence of Einstein’s theory of gravity. Andrea Ghez and Reinhard Genzel shared the other half for showing that a massive black hole sits at the center of our galaxy. Black holes are scary for three reasons. If you fell into a black hole left over when a star died, you would be shredded. Also, the massive black holes seen at the center of all galaxies have insatiable appetites. 6Stay well away from black holes if you know what's good...
    Matthew Rozsa October 18, 2020 11:30PM (UTC) University of Oxford mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose won a Nobel Prize earlier this month for a lifetime of work studying black holes, singularities from which not even light can escape. Yet he is also behind a provocative and controversial theory about the formation of the universe — namely, that the Big Bang did not mark the beginning of the universe as we know it, but merely started the next iteration of our universe. In his theory, known as conformal cyclic cosmology, our current conception of the universe is merely one of a series of infinite universes that came before it and which will come after, too. Cosmology, of course, is full of theories of assorted degrees of harebrainedness, and many of the most famous ones — such as string theory — lack any observational evidence. But Penrose's prediction is different, as there is some evidence in...
    Nicole Karlis October 11, 2020 11:30PM (UTC) Perhaps the old saying "we're better together" applies to the inner workings of the universe, too. On October 1, astronomers announced they found a giant black hole surrounded by protogalaxies that date back to the early universe—as in, when it was less than one billion years old. The discovery was made with help from the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Very Large Telescope; the findings were published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. : It's the first time a close grouping has been observed so soon after the Big Bang. Astronomers hope that this discovery will help us better understand how supermassive black holes formed and grew so big and so quickly. In a statement by the ESO, astronomers say this discovery supports the theory that black holes grow quickly within web-like structures. According to this theory, it's because they need plenty of...
    Before the Big Bang brought about the universe we know, there was another universe and black holes could be proof of its existence, claims Nobel prize winner. Sir Roger Penrose won the Nobel Prize for Physics for a paper that used Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity to prove black holes exist and explain how they form.   He says there is evidence of 'unexplained spots' of electromagnetic radiation dotted across the sky that are 'the size of a full Moon' that he calls Hawking Points.  Penrose says these warm spots are remnants of a previous universe that existed before the Big Bang and could be a clue to our future universe. The points are named after Professor Stephen Hawking who theorised Black holes leak radiation and over a long period of time they will evaporate to nothing. Penrose says these points are proof of the 'conformal cyclic cosmology' theory of the...
    Our universe isn’t special. Around about 13.7 billion years ago, the Big Bang kicked-off life as we know it. But the universe it created isn’t the first — and won’t be the last, according to 2020 Nobel Prize recipient Sir Roger Penrose. The physicist accepted the award this week for discovering landmark evidence of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity and proof that black holes exist. Among his breakthroughs, Penrose’s “conformal cyclic cosmology” (CCC) theory, coined in 2005, posits that our universe is one in billions of years of universes — in a cycle of death and rebirth that hinges on black holes. “I claim that there is observation of Hawking radiation. The Big Bang was not the beginning. There was something before the Big Bang and that something is what we will have in our future,” Sir Roger told The Telegraph. “We have a universe that expands and expands,...
    Our universe isn’t special. Around about 13.7 billion years ago, the Big Bang kicked-off life as we know it. But the universe it created isn’t the first — and won’t be the last, according to 2020 Nobel Prize recipient Sir Roger Penrose. The physicist accepted the award this week for discovering landmark evidence of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity and proof that black holes exist. Among his breakthroughs, Penrose’s “conformal cyclic cosmology” (CCC) theory, coined in 2005, posits that our universe is one in billions of years of universes — in a cycle of death and rebirth that hinges on black holes. “I claim that there is observation of Hawking radiation. The Big Bang was not the beginning. There was something before the Big Bang and that something is what we will have in our future,” Sir Roger told The Telegraph. “We have a universe that expands and expands,...
    The Nobel Prize in Physics will be awarded to three scientists for their work advancing our understanding of "black holes and the Milky Way’s darkest secret," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Tuesday. BREAKING NEWS: The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the 2020 #NobelPrize in Physics with one half to Roger Penrose and the other half jointly to Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez. pic.twitter.com/MipWwFtMjz— The Nobel Prize (@NobelPrize) October 6, 2020 One-half of the award was given to Roger Penrose of the University of Oxford, and the other half was awarded jointly to Reinhard Genzel of the Max Planck Institute in Germany and the University of California, Berkeley, and Andrea Ghez of UCLA, according to the academy. Penrose was awarded for his use of "ingenious mathematical methods in his proof that black holes are a direct consequence of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity"...
    STOCKHOLM — Three scientists won this year’s Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe and that still confound astronomers. Briton Roger Penrose, German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez explained to the world these dead ends of the cosmos, where light and even time doesn’t escape. These staples of both science fact and fiction are still not completely understood, but they are deeply connected, somehow, to the creation of galaxies, where the stars and life exist. Penrose, of the University of Oxford, received half of this year’s prize “for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of” Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, the Nobel Committee said. Genzel, who is at both the Max Planck Institute in Germany and the University of California at Berkeley, and Ghez, of UCLA, received...
    Stockholm — Three physicists won this year's Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for discoveries related black holes. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said that Briton Roger Penrose will receive half of this year's prize "for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of the general theory of relativity."   Goran K. Hansson, the academy's secretary-general, said German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez will receive the second half of the prize "for the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the center of our galaxy." BREAKING NEWS: The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the 2020 #NobelPrize in Physics with one half to Roger Penrose and the other half jointly to Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez. pic.twitter.com/MipWwFtMjz— The Nobel Prize (@NobelPrize) October 6, 2020 "I hope I can inspire other young women into the field," Ghez said at the news conference where the prize...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF/AP) — Three scientists –including UC Berkeley Professor Emeritus Reinhard Genzel — won this year’s Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe. Briton Roger Penrose received half of this year’s prize “for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of the general theory of relativity,” the Nobel Committee said. Genzel and American Andrea Ghez received the second half of the prize “for the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the center of our galaxy.” The prize celebrates “one of the most exotic objects in the universe,” black holes, which have become a staple of science fact and science fiction and where time seems to stand still, according to the committee. Black holes are perhaps the most mysterious and powerful objects in astronomy. They are at the center...
    STOCKHOLM (CBS/AP) – Andrea Ghez, a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is one of three scientists to share the 2020 Nobel Prize for physics. Ghez, Briton Roger Penrose and German Reinhard Genzel were given the award for their discoveries relating to black holes. Ghez and Genzel discovered a supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Penrose proved with mathematics that the formation of black holes was possible, based heavily on Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Goran Hansson, secretary-general of the Royal Swedish Academy announced the recipients Tuesday in Stockholm. The prestigious award comes with a gold medal and prize money of over $1.1 million courtesy of a bequest left by Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel. Ghez graduated from MIT in 1987 with a bachelor’s degree in physics. She is currently a professor of physics and astronomy at UCLA. (© Copyright 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights...
    By DAVID KEYTON and SETH BORENSTEIN STOCKHOLM (AP) — Three scientists won this year’s Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes, the all-consuming monsters that lurk in the darkest parts of the universe. Briton Roger Penrose received half of this year’s prize “for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of the general theory of relativity,” according to the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez received the second half of the prize “for the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the center of our galaxy,” the academy’s secretary-general, Goran K. Hansson, said. The prize celebrates “one of the most exotic objects in the universe,” black holes, which have become a staple of science fact and science fiction and where time even seems to stand still, Nobel committee scientists said. Penrose proved with mathematics that the...
    STOCKHOLM (AP) — Three scientists won this year’s Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for advancing our understanding of black holes. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said that Briton Roger Penrose will receive half of this year’s prize “for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of the general theory of relativity.” Goran K. Hansson, the academy’s secretary-general, said German Reinhard Genzel and American Andrea Ghez will receive the second half of the prize “for the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the center of our galaxy.” The prizes celebrate “one of the most exotic objects in the universe,” black holes, which have become a staple of science fiction and science fact and where time even seems to stand still, Nobel committee scientists said. Penrose proved with mathematics that the formation of black holes was possible, based heavily on Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Genzel...
    The first image of a black hole, captured in 2019, has revealed more support for Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity. The new finding has suggested his theory is now 500 times harder to beat.Einstein's theory, or the idea that gravity is matter warping space-time, has persisted for a hundred years as new astronomical discoveries have been made.Researchers from the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, the team that imaged the central black hole of the M87 galaxy last year, analyzed the black hole's "shadow."Black holes don't cast shadows in the typical sense because they aren't solid objects that prevent light from passing through them, CNN reported. Instead, black holes interact with light a little differently but create a similar effect. A black hole can pull light toward itself, and while light can't escape the inside of a black hole, it's possible for light to make a getaway in a region around...
    (CNN)After boycotting their game against Atlanta Dream in late August, players of the WNBA's Washington Mystics team took to the court wearing white T-shirts printed with seven bullet holes in Jacob Blake's honor.Mystics star Ariel Atkins says the T-shirts might have been "a little vulgar to some people," but that she and her teammates had been determined "to give a very visual image" of what had happened to Blake."It's tough because people are constantly telling us you have no right to speak. It's like, what? I have no right to speak because I play a game? How does that even make sense? Atkins told CNN Sport's Don Riddell, as she noted how shaken some of her teammates were before staging the protest. "I'm a human first. I'm going to speak out on the things that I feel are wrong in this world," added Atkins. "There might be some sacrifices as...
    The detection has occurred from the merger of two black holes of masses much greater than we are used to capturing. A black hole is a cosmic object with such gravity that nothing can escape from it, not even light. And there are two types: black holes with masses less than 60 times the mass of our Sun, which are supposed to have been formed by very massive stars that died and their gravity caused them to collapse on themselves; and supermassive black holes, with more than 1000 solar masses. All gravitational wave detections have always come from the collision of stellar black holes, of less than 60 solar masses; Except this one that has been starred by a black hole of 66 solar masses, and another of 85, resulting in a 142 solar mass black hole. Let’s say it is a mass range that physics...
    Photo Credit: Chris Haynes / NASA / SPL – Getty Images From popular dynamics Researchers have discovered the most powerful black hole link in the recorded black hole class. Intermediate-mass black holes. Used by astronomers LIGO and Virgo Labs To analyze gravitational waves. Researchers say chaotic collisions may be the result of a chain reaction of conflicts. Nearly seven billion years ago, two terrifying black holes merged in a terrifying celestial event that shot the pulse of gravitational waves across the universe. Surprisingly, those gravitational waves reached Earth only a year ago, and astronomers now believe they have discovered More powerful black hole collision: The event they called GW190521. Bad You love our bad universe. So are we. Let’s explore it together. Researchers at the Laser Interferometer Gravity-Wave Laboratory (Virgo Laboratory in Italy) in the United States first detected ripples in the fabric of waves-space-time in May 2019....
    Astronomers have discovered the most massive black hole collision ever observed, and also the most distant, at 7 billion light years away — meaning it happened when our universe was only half its current age. More intriguingly, the black hole merger originated in two black holes of a size that had never been observed before, according to new research published this week. Two papers in the journals Physical Review Letters and The Astrophysical Journal Letters detail this unprecedented cosmic show, which provided scientists with conclusive evidence that a third type of black holes exist. One black hole, roughly 66 times the mass of our own sun, collided with a second black hole 85 times the mass of our sun. This collision created one single black hole around 142 times the mass of the sun; the remaining mass was converted into gravitational energy, which created the shockwave felt faintly on Earth 7 billion years later and 7 billion light-years...
    Nicole Karlis September 3, 2020 11:01PM (UTC) Astronomers have discovered the most massive black hole collision ever observed, and also the most distant, at 7 billion light years away — meaning it happened when our universe was only half its current age. More intriguingly, the black hole merger originated in two black holes of a size that had never been observed before, according to new research published this week. Two papers in the journals Physical Review Letters and The Astrophysical Journal Letters detail this unprecedented cosmic show, which provided scientists with conclusive evidence that a third type of black holes exist. One black hole, roughly 66 times the mass of our own sun, collided with a second black hole 85 times the mass of our sun. This collision created one single black hole around 142 times the mass of the sun; the remaining mass was converted into gravitational energy, which created the...
    Black holes are getting stranger — even to astronomers. They’ve now detected the signal from a long ago violent collision of two black holes that created a new one of a size that had never been seen before. “It’s the biggest bang since the Big Bang observed by humanity,” said Caltech physicist Alan Weinstein, who was part of the discovery team. Black holes are compact regions of space so densely packed that not even light can escape. Until now, astronomers only had observed them in two general sizes. There are “small” ones called stellar black holes that are formed when a star collapses and are about the size of small cities. And there are supermassive black holes that are millions, maybe billions, of times more massive than our sun and around which entire galaxies revolve. According to astronomers’ calculations, anything in between didn’t quite make sense, because stars that grew...
    Black holes are getting stranger — even to astronomers. They’ve now detected the signal from a long ago violent collision of two black holes that created a new one of a size that had never been seen before. “It’s the biggest bang since the Big Bang observed by humanity,” said Caltech physicist Alan Weinstein, who was part of the discovery team. Black holes are compact regions of space so densely packed that not even light can escape. Until now, astronomers only had observed them in two general sizes. There are “small” ones called stellar black holes that are formed when a star collapses and are about the size of small cities. And there are supermassive black holes that are millions, maybe billions, of times more massive than our sun and around which entire galaxies revolve. According to astronomers’ calculations, anything in between didn’t quite make sense, because stars that grew...
    Scientists have detected what they believe to be the most powerful, most massive, most distant merger of two black holes in the history of the universe, releasing the energy of eight suns. And from that event, they've detected something even more special — a super-rare type of black hole.  The result of the collision is an "intermediate-mass" black hole, with a mass between 100 and 1,000 times that of the sun. It's the first one that has ever been found, scientists said.   Some black holes, referred to as "stellar" are relatively small, up to 10 times the mass of the sun, forming when a star explodes and dies. Other black holes, called "supermassive," are unfathomably large, amounting to billions of times the mass of the sun, such as Sagittarius A*, at the center of the Milky Way.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox This new black hole's...
    Black holes do not cease to be strange, even to astronomers. They have just detected the signal of an ancient violent collision of two black holes that created a new one of never seen size. “It is the most violent explosion since the Big Bang that humanity has observed,” said physicist Alan Weinstein of the California Institute of Technology, a member of the team that made the discovery. Black holes are regions of space so dense that they don’t even let light escape. Those observed so far by astronomers were of two sizes overall. Some are “small,” called stellar black holes, formed when a star collapses and about the size of a small city. The others are the supermassives, millions or billions of times more massive than our Sun, around which entire galaxies revolve. According to the calculations of astronomers, it did not make sense...
    Black holes make up a set of cosmic objects, one of the most mysterious in the universe. Scientists theorize about their existence for a hundred years, and some indirect evidence of them had already been detected; until at the beginning of 2019 we got the first image of one of them. The photograph represents the event horizon of the black hole at the center of the galaxy M87, 55 million light-years from home, in what was one of the greatest milestones in recent science. As we pointed out, the details of the structure of a black hole were calculated from Albert Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity. What we call the singularity constitutes the center of a black hole, and is hidden by the ‘surface’ of the object, the event horizon. Within the event horizon, the escape velocity (that is, the speed required for matter to escape...
    Distant black hole collision is the largest and most distant ever seen by LIGO und Virgo inventors The fourth gravitational-wave detection from LIGO and Virgo’s third observation stream released today is the biggest news: the largest link of the two black holes observed to date. When the Universe was half its current age the black hole collision formed 142 solar mass black holes. This is the first direct observation of the birth of an intermediate-mass black hole. The pair’s heavier black hole is even more amazing: at 85 times the mass of our Sun, it may not be in line with current understanding of stellar eruptions, but it may be born from a previous binary link. It is not known whether this signal, GW190521, is the first observed representative of a new class of binary black holes or at the upper end of a broad mass spectrum. Scientists at the...
    Black holes do not cease to be strange, even to astronomers. They have just detected the signal of an ancient violent collision of two black holes that created a new one of never seen size. “It is the most violent explosion since the Big Bang that humanity has observed,” said physicist Alan Weinstein of the California Institute of Technology, a member of the team that made the discovery. Black holes are regions of space so dense that they don’t even let light escape. Those observed so far by astronomers were of two sizes overall. Some are “small,” called stellar black holes, formed when a star collapses and about the size of a small city. The others are the supermassives, millions or billions of times more massive than our Sun, around which entire galaxies revolve. According to the calculations of astronomers, it did not make sense...
    Seven billion years ago, at a distance of 17 billion light years, two black holes, of 66 and 85 solar masses, merged into a new massive black hole, of around 142 solar masses. Both the primary components and the remnant are in a higher mass range than has been observed to date, and the resulting black hole is the most massive black hole ever detected with gravitational waves. Virgo& nbsp; in Italy and & nbsp;LIGO& nbsp; in the US) that have had hundreds of experts from various countries, including Spanish participation. “data-reactid =” 18 “> This finding has been the result of 15 months of work by two major scientific collaborations (Virgo in Italy and LIGO in the USA) that have had hundreds of experts from various countries, including Spanish participation. The massive binary system has been christened GW190521 – since the gravitational wave event was...
    Astronomers may have detected the most massive collision of two black holes ever discovered, a chaotic merger that occurred some 7 billion years ago, the signs of which have only just reached us. The cataclysmic event offered researchers a front-row seat to the birth of one of the Universe’s most elusive objects. The distant show included two major players: one black hole roughly 66 times the mass of our Sun, and another black hole roughly 85 times the mass of our Sun. The two came close together, rapidly spinning around one another several times per second before eventually crashing together in a violent burst of energy that sent shockwaves throughout the Universe. The result of their merger? One single black hole roughly 142 times the mass of our Sun. Such a find could be a big one for astronomers. Up until now, scientists have been able to detect and indirectly...
    As Vanderbilt University research assistant professor, Dr. Karam Jani, explained to News Brig, the signal itself was minuscule — a mere four squiggly lines lasting just a tenth of a second — but its implications for our understanding of the cosmos are immense. “We were able to confirm that this came from a collision of two black holes,” Jani said. “Both of those are extremely massive; something that we know that stars cannot make.”  The individual black holes weighed roughly 85 and 65 times the mass of the sun, respectively. Both are beyond the theoretical weight limit of collapsars. When they smashed together six billion years ago in a region of space 5 gigaparsecs away, they released “eight solar masses of energy” in the form of a gravitational wave and gave birth to the even more massive IMBH that the team detected, according to a Vanderbilt press release. Jani explains...
    Black holes are getting stranger — even to astronomers. They’ve now detected the signal from a long ago violent collision of two black holes that created a new one of a size that had never been seen before. “It’s the biggest bang since the Big Bang observed by humanity,” said Caltech physicist Alan Weinstein, who was part of the discovery team. Black holes are compact regions of space so densely packed that not even light can escape. Until now, astronomers only had observed them in two general sizes. There are “small” ones called stellar black holes that are formed when a star collapses and are about the size of small cities. And there are supermassive black holes that are millions, maybe billions, of times more massive than our sun and around which entire galaxies revolve. According to astronomers’ calculations, anything in between didn’t quite make sense, because...
    (CNN)Astronomers have detected the most massive merging of two black holes yet through the oldest and most distant gravitational waves to ever hit Earth. This collision created the first intermediate-mass black hole ever discovered, and it has a mass of 142 times that of our sun. The "bang" of energy created by this black hole merger released through gravitational waves, or ripples in the space-time continuum, equaled the energy of eight suns. And those ripples took 7 billion years to travel across space to reach us on Earth.This newly discovered black hole has what's called an "intermediate" mass because its mass is between 100 and 1,000 times that of the sun. It's more than that of stellar mass (the mass of stars) and less than that of supermassive black holes.The signal astronomers traced through gravitational waves likely happened the moment the two black holes came together. Read MoreThe gravitational waves...
    Other theories about how these black holes grew so rapidly are that a small fraction of the black holes grew at an incredible rate, or that smaller black holes merged to become a supermassive black hole. Muhammad Latif, an astrophysicist at the University of the United Arab Emirates in Abu Dhabi, agrees with Regan that the supermassive star model remains our best theory at the moment. Latif was principal investigator of the FIRSTBHs project that, like SmartStars, investigated the plausibility of the supermassive star model, using simulations on a supercomputer in France. His project, which was carried out at the CNRS in France, showed that supermassive stars could produce seed black holes hundreds of thousands of times the mass of our sun. “We found this method to be basically feasible,” Latif said, explaining that these initial seed black holes are large enough to explain the growth of billion-solar-mass supermassive black...
    black holes they always allow us to explore a little further and discover new things. Now a group of astronomers led by Keichi Wada of the University of Kagoshima in Japan, discovered that around these phenomena of the universe planets are formed that were baptized as Blanets. “Data-reactid =” 12 “> Black holes always allow us to explore a little further and discover new things.Now a group of astronomers led by Keichi Wada of the University of Kagoshima in Japan, discovered that around these phenomena of the universe are formed planets that were baptized as Blanets. Blanets are structures that can form in the massive clouds of dust and gas around supermassive black holes. How are the Blanets formed? the Astronomy site, these planets are born from “chen dust particles collide, they stick together to form larger clumps that sweep up more dust as they orbit the star. Eventually these...
    Researchers at Harvard University have claimed that he believes that black holes contain “movies” of the universe in the numerous bright rings that circle around the border of the mysterious space phenomenon. According to New Scientist, Michael Johnson, a radio astronomer working on the research, realized that black holes may contain such movies after a photograph of a black hole was captured for the first time in April 2019. As was previously reported by The Inquisitr, the photo captured a black hole — and its “ring of fire” — in a galaxy about 55 million light-years from our own Milky Way. Johnson claimed that he and his colleagues were inspired after seeing the groundbreaking photograph. “After the result was published, we were all getting together and asking: what does this thing mean?” he explained. The answer came nearly a year later. He and his fellow researchers at Harvard’s Black Hole...
    A new mystifying event in space is puzzling astronomers around the world after a black hole — or at least the ring of light around it — appeared to vanish completely for 40 full days before returning once more, according to a new paper published yesterday in the The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Though black holes are infamous for the fact that they cannot be seen, as not even light can escape their incredible force of gravity, there are other ways in which scientists can detect the objects, including a ring of light around its border known as the corona. Astronomers noted that over the space of a year, the corona of a black hole in a galaxy 275 million light-years away began to dim slowly until it disappeared altogether for 40 days. “It became undetectable, which we have never seen before,” said Massachusetts Institute of Technology physicist Erin Kara. “We...
    George DvorskyJust now•Filed to:Black holesBlack holesastronomyastrophysicsscienceSaveArtistic conception: The supermassive black hole surrounded by a disk of hot gas and the X-ray corona (shown in bluish-white). The pinkish streak is debris falling into the black hole—the shattered remains of a runaway star. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech Two years ago, astronomers watched in confusion as the corona of a supermassive black hole quickly faded from view, only to reappear a few months later. New research suggests this strange episode was caused by a runaway star. Supermassive black holes are located in the centers of galaxies, and, like ordinary black holes, they don’t give off any light. That said, they’re often surrounded by a swirling ring of gas, called an accretion disk, which causes their surroundings to shine rather brightly. Coronas—halos of high-energy particles that generate X-ray light—also betray the presence of supermassive black holes, as this radiation can be detected from Earth. In...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesota’s connections to famous musicians extends well beyond Prince and Bob Dylan. Decades ago, Jimmy Page of Led Zepellin had his 1960 Les Paul custom guitar stolen after a concert in the Twin Cities. Page, a rock and roll hall of famer and one of the most famous guitarists of all time, was devastated and offered a handsome reward to get it back. Forty-five years later, he did. WCCO’s John Lauritsen shows us how two St. Paul men happened upon a legendary discovery. A “Guitar God” Jimmy Page’s star was skyrocketing well before he founded Led Zeppelin. “He worked with The Who. He recorded on the song “Downtown.” He recorded songs for the James Bond movies,” said Nate Westgor of Willie’s American Guitars in St. Paul. Behind Page’s success was his 1960 Les Paul custom guitar — known as Black Beauty. The last time Page had it...
    (CNN)The fastest-growing black hole in the universe is 34 billion times the mass of our sun and feasts on a meal the equivalent of our sun each day, according to a new study. This massive, hungry black hole was first identified and studied by researchers in May 2018. Previously, they believed it consumed the mass equivalent to our sun every two days. Now, they have a better understanding of this monster black hole and its gluttonous behavior. The study published Wednesday in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.The black hole is known as J2157 and exists more than 12 billion light-years back in the distant universe. Astronomers are trying to understand how such massive black holes could evolve during the early days of the universe. The researchers continue to search for more massive black holes like this one to understand how they have grown. Astronomers may have...
    Black hole collisions tend not to produce light by their very nature — you may catch gravitational waves, but that’s about it. However, scientists might have just found one of those rare instances where a collision was visible. A team using May 2019 data from both the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Europe’s Virgo detector has spotted what appears to be the first known instance of a “flare of light” from two merging black holes. If so, the key would likely be their interaction with a third, larger counterpart. Many galaxies have supermassive black holes at their center whose giant gas disk can merge smaller black holes. When that happens, the newly unified black hole can be sent off in an unusual direction through the disk, sparking a gas reaction days or weeks after the gravitational waves appear. The timing of the flare lined up with this, and it...
    George Dvorsky2 minutes ago•Filed to:Black holesBlack holesblack hole mergerslightastronomygravitational wavesphysicsastrophysicsscienceSaveConceptual image of two black holes on the cusp of merging, situated within the gaseous disk of a nearby supermassive black hole (the bright spot in the background).Image: Caltech/R. Hurt (Infrared Processing & Analysis Center (Other) Black holes aren’t supposed to leak any light when they smash into each other—or at least that’s what physicists thought. On May 21, 2019, astronomers using the Virgo interferometer and the National Science Foundation’s Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detected a gravitational wave signature consistent with a black hole merger. This event, called S190521g, at first seemed to produce no visible light. A subsequent review of data collected at a separate observatory, Caltech University’s Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), has yielded evidence of light coming from this same event, which, if confirmed, would be a first for astronomy. This research, led by astronomer Matthew Graham...
    Astronomers have noticed a secret item that they say could be a black hole or a neutron star. Both black holes and neutron stars are the stays of lifeless stars. “When the most significant stars die, they collapse underneath their possess gravity and leave guiding black holes when stars that are a bit much less huge die, they explode in a supernova and depart powering dense, useless remnants of stars called neutron stars,” clarifies the Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in a statement. LIGO, which is operated by MIT and Caltech, supported by the Countrywide Science Foundation, discussed that astronomers have lengthy been fascinated by the “gap” that lies in between black holes and neutron stars. “The heaviest recognized neutron star is no extra than 2.5 instances the mass of our solar, or 2.5 solar masses and the lightest acknowledged black gap is about 5 solar masses,” it stated in a...
    Astronomers have spotted a mystery object that they say could be a black hole or a neutron star. Both black holes and neutron stars are the remains of dead stars. “When the most massive stars die, they collapse under their own gravity and leave behind black holes; when stars that are a bit less massive die, they explode in a supernova and leave behind dense, dead remnants of stars called neutron stars,” explains the Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in a statement. LIGO, which is operated by MIT and Caltech, supported by the National Science Foundation, explained that astronomers have long been fascinated by the “gap” that lies between black holes and neutron stars. “The heaviest known neutron star is no more than 2.5 times the mass of our sun, or 2.5 solar masses and the lightest known black hole is about 5 solar masses,” it explained in a statement. “The...
    (CNN)When black holes collide, they typically create gravitational waves that can be detected on Earth, but not light. Now, for the first time, astronomers believe they have detected the first light from a black hole merger.Gravitational waves, or ripples in space and time, don't produce light. However, when a black hole merger was observed by ground-based gravitational wave detectors on May 21, 2019, astronomers saw what they think was a flare of light.This flare of light matters because it will help astronomers learn more about black holes, where gravity is so strong nothing can usually escape, and the role they play in the formation and development of the universe. "The reason looking for flares like this is so important is that it helps enormously with astrophysics and cosmology questions," said Mansi Kasliwal, study coauthor and an assistant professor of astronomy at Caltech. "If we can do this again and detect...
    A whopping 7.5 billion light-years from Earth, two black holes, each about the size of Long Island, rapidly spun around each other several times per second before smashing together in a cataclysmic explosion that sent shockwaves through the Universe. Normally, violent unions like this are dark events, but astronomers think they saw a flare of light emerge from this celestial dance — potentially the first time light has ever been seen from black holes merging. It’s a unique discovery since black holes are notorious for not producing any light at all. These super dense objects are so massive that nothing can escape their gravitational pull — not even light. So how exactly did researchers see a flare from two black holes that aren’t supposed to flare? Well, the black holes may have just been in the right place at the right time, according to a new study published in the...
    Astronomers have spotted a mystery object that they say could be a black hole or a neutron star. Both black holes and neutron stars are the remains of dead stars. “When the most massive stars die, they collapse under their own gravity and leave behind black holes; when stars that are a bit less massive die, they explode in a supernova and leave behind dense, dead remnants of stars called neutron stars,” explains the Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in a statement. BLACK HOLE DEVOURING A NEUTRON STAR CAUSED RIPPLES IN SPACE AND TIME, SCIENTISTS SAY LIGO, which is operated by MIT and Caltech, supported by the National Science Foundation, explained that astronomers have long been fascinated by the “gap” that lies between black holes and neutron stars. “The heaviest known neutron star is no more than 2.5 times the mass of our sun, or 2.5 solar masses, and the lightest known black...
    Astronomers have found evidence for thousands of black holes near the center of the Milky Way galaxy using data from NASA’s Chandray X-ray Observatory. According to NASA, this bounty of black holes consists of stellar-mass black holes, which tend to weight between five to 30 times the mass of our sun. They were discovered within three light-years of the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way’s center — known as Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). “Theoretical studies of the dyn amics of stars in galaxies have indicated that a large population of stellar mass black holes — as many as 20,000 — could drift inward over the eons and collect around Sgr A*,” according to the space agency. This recent analysis using Chandra data is the first observational evidence for such a black hole bounty. A black hole by itself is invisible. However, a black hole — or neutron...
    A galaxy hunting telescope has completed its first full sweep of the hot, energetic universe, resulting in a stunning map with more than one million cosmic objects. The eROSITA X-ray Telescope has been scanning the sky for over 182 days and has discovered twice the number of known X-ray sources uncovered over the past 60 years. The all-sky image highlights the exquisite detail structure of the hot gas in the Milky Way, stars with strong, magnetically active hot coronae, X-ray binary stars and black holes, along with spectacular supernova remnants. The map is about four times deeper than the previous all-sky survey by the ROSAT telescope 30 years ago, and has produced around 10 times more sources. A galaxy hunting telescope has completed its first full sweep of the hot, energetic universe, resulting in a stunning map (pictured)  with more than one million cosmic objects. Pictured is also the...
    "Physicists like to probe the extreme,” said Garrett Goon, a physicist at Carnegie Mellon University. “The fact that you can’t go further, that something is changing, something is blocking you—something interesting is happening there.” For decades, black holes have played the headlining role in the thought experiments that physicists use to probe nature’s extremes. These invisible spheres form when matter becomes so concentrated that everything within a certain distance, even light, gets trapped by its gravity. Albert Einstein equated the force of gravity with curves in the space-time continuum, but the curvature grows so extreme near a black hole’s center that Einstein’s equations break. Thus, generations of physicists have looked to black holes for clues about the true, quantum origin of gravity, which must fully reveal itself in their hearts and match Einstein’s approximate picture everywhere else. Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent publication...
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