2020-09-27@23:20:01 GMT
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    When filmmaker Dawn Porter began work on her documentary about the life of Rep. John Lewis, she knew she wanted to find a way to bring the revered congressman out of the pages of history books and into the full scope of his humanity. Her goal was not only to help viewers become more familiar with Lewis’ astonishing accomplishments — from his fearless work during the civil rights movement to his lauded persistence as a legislator — but also to show some of his easygoing relatability. “I felt like we were in danger of kind of canonizing the congressman, and forgetting that he’s a flesh-and-blood human being,” said Porter. “Because if you say that he’s a deity, then you and...
    Judge Amy Coney Barrett, who President Trump nominated Saturday to serve on the Supreme Court, could have a major impact for decades to come on landmark civil liberties cases and other cases coming before the high court if the Republican-controlled Senate confirms her as expected. Barrett could have a long tenure on the court because she is only 48, which is young by Supreme Court standards. She would fill the seat held for the past 27 years by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Sept. 18 at age 87. The liberal Ginsburg was considered by many to be the only justice on the Supreme Court with a civil rights background. She played an oversized role in many key civil rights...
    Amy Coney Barrett regards herself as an “originalist,” that is, someone who believes that all legal decisions must be based on the “original understanding” of the Constitution. This is often put forward as a straightforward, consistent lens through which law can be viewed, rather than trying to put into context little things like shifting views on race and gender equality. However, originalism is further complicated by a split between groups focused on “intent” and those focused on “meaning.” And if you think those are the same things … well, you’re just wrong. Intentionalists believe the law is determined by what the original authors of the Constitution intended when they took quill to parchment. Those focused on meaning insist that they support the “public...
    A black civil rights official predicted to "Fox & Friends" Friday that "violence" awaits "intimidators" who've been harassing restaurant diners as part of protests against alleged racial injustice and police brutality. What are the details? Peter Kirsanow, a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, told the network that protesters who have been harassing easily picked-on diners — many of them elderly — will soon overplay their hand: "It's not gonna end well at some point. At some point, they're gonna sit at the wrong table, and it's gonna have some violence." Reacting to video of two elderly diners harassed and threatened by protesters in St. Petersburg, Florida, hours after a grand jury on Wednesday...
    ROME — Pope Francis denounced the nations and international groups that promote abortion, telling the U.N. General Assembly Friday that the “unborn child” must be protected. “Sad to say, some countries and international institutions are also promoting abortion as one of the so-called ‘essential services’ provided in the humanitarian response to the pandemic,” the pope said in a video-streamed message delivered from the Vatican. “It is troubling to see how simple and convenient it has become for some to deny the existence of a human life as a solution to problems that can and must be solved for both the mother and her unborn child,” he added. “I urge civil authorities to be especially attentive to children who are denied...
    (CNN)Not all heroes wear a cape; some wear a robe.When the nation lost Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September 18, we lost an American heroine whose superpower was harnessing the law to protect millions of women, members of the LGBTQ community, people of color and those with disabilities. Vanita Gupta We are living in a moment of deep uncertainty -- one in which countless people in America know that equal justice is still an aspiration, and it feels like we are regressing as a nation. And for good reason: President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are seemingly committed to rolling back progress on civil rights and blunting the positive change so many Americans seek. And they are...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — There are still questions 24 hours after a Kentucky grand jury brought no charges against Louisville police for the killing of Breonna Taylor. The 26-year-old paramedic was shot and killed by police issuing a search warrant on March 13. Protesters marched across the country Wednesday, including in Pittsburgh, calling for justice. Local civil rights attorney Todd Hollis said this case has many challenges, transparency being the biggest one. One of the biggest questions in the case is whether Louisville police announced themselves while issuing the search warrant at her home. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said the officers did, while Taylor’s boyfriend Kenneth Walker says the officers did not. Walker claims he thought the police were...
    Daily Caller’s senior White House correspondent Christian Datoc sat down with civil rights activist and attorney Robert Patillo on Thursday to break down the fallout from Wednesday’s decision in the Breonna Taylor case. Patillo, who has previously spoken with Datoc about the George Floyd killing, explained how he understood the frustration stemming from Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s decision, which only saw one of the three officers involved in Taylor’s killing charged with misdemeanor offenses. It’s not even the decision itself that’s caused so much anguish, Patillo argued, but the way it was handed down and the lack of transparency throughout the grand jury process. The criminal justice system must be applied to all people in the same way, regardless...
    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Rosemary Lowe, a longtime civil rights leader in Kansas City, has died. She was 94. For decades, Lowe served as president of the Santa Fe Area Council, the Kansas City Star reported. She also worked behind the scenes behind the scenes to help with the founding of Freedom Inc., a Black political club that has long fought to end white-faction control of Black residents. Lowe eventually won a City Council seat representing the city’s 14th Ward, an area where a majority of residents are Black. She held the seat for 20 years. Her death Tuesday was confirmed by her family and a funeral home, but no other details surrounding the circumstances were immediately available. “She...
    A Black Lives Matter co-founder says black Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron gave a 'Bull Connor speech in 2020' when he announced why criminal charges weren't brought against police officers in Breonna Taylor's death.   Alicia Garza likened Cameron to the notorious civil rights-era segregationist on Wednesday in regards the rising Republican star's press conference in the Taylor investigation.  'This was an atrocity,' the BLM co-founder told MSNBC's Joy Reid.  'I think what I saw this morning was a Bull Connor speech in 2020. And... unfortunately, it was being given by a Black prosecutor.' Bull Connor was the commissioner of public safety in Birmingham, Alabama, for more than 20 years in the 1960s and was a staunch opponent of the civil rights movement. ...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Powerful voices are rising in opposition to the decision not to charge the Louisville police officers for Breonna Taylor's death, including prominent civil rights attorney Connie Rice.Rice, who has led the charge for reforms in police departments in Los Angles and around the country, says the grand jury decision to bring no charges is a travesty."It's the wrong decision and Breonna Taylor should be alive," Rice says.A Kentucky grand jury brought no charges against Louisville police for the killing of Taylor during a drug raid gone wrong, with prosecutors saying Wednesday two officers who fired their weapons at the Black woman were justified in using force to protect themselves.The grand jury instead charged fired Officer Brett...
    Police in cities across America are unable to protect the neighborhoods that need them most if they are called to help control riots, civil rights activist Bob Woodson told "Tucker Carlson Tonight" Wednesday. "There is an old African proverb that when bull elephants fight, the grass always loses," Woodson said in response to the violence that erupted in Louisville after a former police officer was indicted in connection with the drug raid that led to the shooting death of Breonna Taylor earlier this year. LIVE UPDATES: PROTESTS ERUPT IN LOUISVILLE AFTER BREONNA TAYLOR GRAND JURY DECISION  "In this situation, the losers are poor Blacks ... they are the ones that are suffering," Woodson added. "It means that if police are downtown policing riots, it means they are not in the neighborhoods protecting them."...
    “People are going to have some serious questions" after one of three officers involved in the Louisville drug raid that led to the police shooting death of Breonna Taylor was indicted, but not on charges directly tied to her death, civil rights attorney Daryl Parks told “The Daily Briefing” Wednesday. “It’s always a tough thing to swallow in the African-American community when you see a life being taken of a person of color and yet the system fails to respond or gives multiple reasons why it can’t respond,” Parks told host Dana Perino. “Yet in other situations we see where the system properly responds and finds a way to hold a person accountable.” BREONNA TAYLOR SHOOTING: FIRED LOUISVILLE OFFICER INDICTED ON CRIMINAL CHARGES BUT NOT IN WOMAN'S DEATH He added, “This is a heavy day, especially, for...
    PORTSMOUTH — Residents took a trip back in time, as honest Abe read the Emancipation Proclamation in honor of Emancipation Day at Tracy Park. In celebration of Emancipation Day and the start of the Portsmouth Unity Arts Project, residents had the opportunity to learn about some historical civil rights icons that lived and helped in Portsmouth. During the ceremony, which took place at Tracy Park Tuesday, participants heard from members of the community about uniting the community and honored those who helped with street banners displayed around downtown Portsmouth. “We can’t change Columbus. We can’t change New York. We can’t change Chicago, but we can start right here in Scioto County and do something together,” organizer of Portsmouth Unity Arts...
    Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump on Wednesday condemned a grand jury decision to indict a single Louisville, Ky., officer in the case of Breonna Taylor, who was fatally shot by police inside her apartment. “Jefferson County Grand Jury indicts former ofc. Brett Hankison with 3 counts of Wanton Endangerment in 1st Degree for bullets that went into other apartments but NOTHING for the murder of Breonna Taylor. This is outrageous and offensive!” Crump, who represents Taylor’s family, tweeted Wednesday. Jefferson County Grand Jury indicts former ofc. Brett Hankison with 3 counts of Wanton Endangerment in 1st Degree for bullets that went into other apartments but NOTHING for the murder of Breonna Taylor. This is outrageous and offensive! pic.twitter.com/EarmBAhhuf— Ben Crump (@AttorneyCrump)...
    Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenOmar fires back at Trump over rally remarks: 'This is my country' Trump mocks Biden appearance, mask use ahead of first debate Trump attacks Omar for criticizing US: 'How did you do where you came from?' MORE said Wednesday he'd give new powers to the Civil Rights Division at the Department of Justice and would bring the agency inside the White House as a way to “elevate its standing.” Speaking at an economic summit for Black businesspeople in Charlotte, N.C., Biden said he would “significantly increase” authority for the Civil Rights Division, which enforces laws and statutes based on race and gender. The Democratic nominee said he’d ensure the division has “access to and transparency into...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Rev. James Lawson is one of the lions of the civil rights movement and is still going strong at 92.Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. called Lawson "the leading theorist and strategist of nonviolence in the world," and he is known as the "mind of the movement."For nearly all his life, James Morris Lawson Jr. has been a student and a teacher of nonviolence as a means of social change. His first lesson came as a fourth grader in Ohio. He punched a kid who hurled a racial slur, and his mother scolded him."She said 'Jimmy, what good did that do?' And from that time I recognized that slapping and kicking and screaming and fighting was of...
    RICHMOND, Calif. (KGO) -- A Bay Area legend turned 99-years-old today. Betty Reid Soskin celebrated on Zoom and offered sage advice to get out and vote this fall.When you're 99, it's easy to look back -- But Betty Reid Soskin is also looking ahead, saying she's grateful.RELATED: Bay Area legal community shares memories of Supreme Court icon Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg"There are so many pieces that are important to me that I've lived through and can only now recognize as having been special."Soskin was born on September 2, 1922. During World War II she worked as a file clerk for a boilermaker's union and founded Reid's Records in Berkeley. It was open for 75 years.She was a songwriter in the...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The Rev. Robert Graetz, the only white minister to support the Montgomery bus boycott, died Sunday. He was 92. His daughter, Meta Ellis, shared the news in a Facebook post from the Southeastern Synod Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The church did not mention a cause of death. Graetz was the minister of the majority-Black Trinity Lutheran Evangelical Church in Montgomery. Graetz was the only local white clergyman to support the boycott. He and his wife, Jeannie, faced harassment, threats and bombings as a result. Sparked by the December 1955 arrest of Rosa Parks, the planned one-day boycott of Montgomery City Lines became a 381-day protest of the segregated bus system that ended with a...
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The Rev. Robert Graetz, the only white minister to support the Montgomery bus boycott, died Sunday. He was 92. His daughter, Meta Ellis, shared the news in a Facebook post from the Southeastern Synod Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The church did not mention a cause of death. Graetz was the minister of the majority-Black Trinity Lutheran Evangelical Church in Montgomery. Graetz was the only local white clergyman to support the boycott. He and his wife, Jeannie, faced harassment, threats and bombings as a result. Sparked by the December 1955 arrest of Rosa Parks, the planned one-day boycott of Montgomery City Lines became a 381-day protest of the segregated bus system that ended with a U.S....
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The Rev. Robert Graetz, the only white minister to support the Montgomery bus boycott, died Sunday. He was 92. His daughter, Meta Ellis, shared the news in a Facebook post from the Southeastern Synod Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The church did not mention a cause of death. Graetz was the minister of the majority-Black Trinity Lutheran Evangelical Church in Montgomery. Graetz was the only local white clergyman to support the boycott. He and his wife, Jeannie, faced harassment, threats and bombings as a result. Sparked by the December 1955 arrest of Rosa Parks, the planned one-day boycott of Montgomery City Lines became a 381-day protest of the segregated bus system that ended with a...
    CNN contributor Ana Navarro said Monday that by attempting to vote on President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee before the November election, both the president and Republican lawmakers were disrespecting Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s dying wish not to be replaced until after the next presidential inauguration. NPR reported Ginsburg’s final words spoken to her granddaughter Clara Spera: “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.” Navarro said, “I just feel that the reaction has been so disrespectful to Ruth Bader Ginsburg. And whether you agree would her politics or not, the American people, particularly women, owe RGB such a huge debt of gratitude for how much she moved the ball...
    By ANNA LIZ NICHOLS, Associated Press/Report for America LANSING, Mich (AP) — A state building previously named after a slave owner now bears the name of two former state legislators who led efforts to reform Michigan's civil rights laws. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and other state officials unveiled the new sign in a ceremony in Lansing on Monday. It marks the first time in state history a state building is named after an African-American woman. Formerly known as the Lewis Cass Building, after a former U.S. senator from Michigan and slave owner, the building will now be called the Elliott-Larsen Building. Reps. Daisy Elliott, a Detroit Democrat and Mel Larsen, an Oakland County Republican, sponsored the 1977 Civil Rights Act that...
    The massive wildfires brought heavy smoke across Portland last week, briefly veering the focus away from the social unrest and the more than 100 nights of demonstrations in the Oregon city. However, protests resumed over the weekend and one local civil rights leader said demonstrations were not going to stop because of the fires. "Fire's not going to smoke us out," Rev. E.D. Mondaine, president of Portland’s chapter of the NAACP, told KATU 2 during an interview that aired Sunday. Video"Flames are not going to smoke us out," he continued. "COVID is not going to snuff us out. The time for equality and justice is upon us," he said. PORTLAND PROTESTS RESUME AFTER WILDFIRE HIATUS WITH GINSBURG VIGIL, MORE VANDALISM Protests resumed on Friday, when demonstrators marched...
    You get three guesses why and the first two don't count. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, an independent federal board of eight commissioners tasked with investigating civil rights issues and recommending remedies, has created a new series of recommendations to better protect minority voting rights during the coronavirus pandemic. We will never see it, reports USA Today. By a party line vote, the committee's four conservative members voted to block its release and end work on the project. The reasons for the conservative objections are ... interesting. The Trump-appointed Stephen Gilchrist told USA Today that he found the timing of issuing a report on voting challenges and recommendations so close to an election "somewhat suspect." (Work on the report...
    Referring to the “very sad news” of Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, former vice president and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden honored Ginsburg’s legacy in brief remarks Friday night—and made clear that the Senate should not rush to confirm Donald Trump’s choice of a replacement for her. Biden noted that “it was my honor to preside over her confirmation hearing,” and spoke to both Ginsburg’s career as a women’s rights attorney before her confirmation and how, as a justice, “She was fierce and unflinching in her pursuit of the civil and legal rights of everyone.” But the bottom line is that, while we honor her, there is a fight to prevent Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell from ramming...
    A Border Patrol agent in South Texas is facing federal charges after she allegedly deprived a citizen of her civil rights, according to prosecutors in the Southern District of Texas. Adriana Gandarilla, a senior Border Patrol supervisor with 19 years of experience, is set to make her initial court appearance on Friday. On May 6, 2018, a woman living in La Joya began recording the agency’s law enforcement activities that took place at her residence, according to court documents. Gandarilla allegedly commanded the woman to stop recording before forcefully grabbing the woman by her neck and arms, according to the court document. Gandarilla “willfully deprived (the woman) of the rights, protected and secured by the United States Constitution, to record...
    By CUNEYT DIL, Associated Press A former doctor at a Veterans Affairs hospital in West Virginia pleaded guilty Thursday to federal charges that he molested three male patients and violated their civil rights. Jonathan Yates pleaded guilty in court filings to three counts of depriving veterans of their civil rights under color of law, which means the crimes were committed while on duty. He faces up to 30 years in prison. Yates worked at the Beckley VA Medical Center as a doctor of osteopathic medicine, which involves hands-on treatments through stretching and massaging. His patients and victims were seeking to manage their chronic pain. Yates, 51, was arrested in April, and a grand jury indicted him a month later on...
    A former doctor at a Veterans Affairs hospital in West Virginia pleaded guilty Thursday to federal charges that he molested three male patients and violated their civil rights. Jonathan Yates pleaded guilty in court filings to three counts of depriving veterans of their civil rights under color of law, which means the crimes were committed while on duty. He faces up to 30 years in prison. Yates worked at the Beckley VA Medical Center as a doctor of osteopathic medicine, which involves hands-on treatments through stretching and massaging. His patients and victims were seeking to manage their chronic pain. Yates, 51, was arrested in April, and a grand jury indicted him a month later on five counts of...
    TEANECK, New Jersey (WABC) -- A new school in New Jersey named after an American civil rights activist and educator held its grand opening ceremony Thursday.The Theodora Smiley Lacey School officially opened its doors in Teaneck, and Lacey herself was in attendance celebrating the big day.The 88-year-old helped organize the Montgomery bus boycott, fought for voting rights and fair housing, and helped lead the effort to integrate schools in New Jersey."This is something you can't even dream about," she said.Related: Taxes going up for the rich in New Jersey, but many families will get a breakLacey is often described as the First Lady of Teaneck.She arrived in Teaneck in 1961 to a town that was the first to voluntarily desegregate...
    Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan described a call from Attorney General William Barr to charge rioters and violent protesters with sedition as "chilling" and "the latest abuse of power from the Trump administration." According to a report from The Wall Street Journal, Barr suggested during a call with federal prosecutors to charge protesters whove been arrested for violent acts with sedition. A New York Times report also said the Justice Departments civil rights division hinted at charging Durkan with criminal offenses for allowing protesters to demonstrate in a police-free zone, first referred to as CHAZ and then CHOP. "This report is chilling and the latest abuse of power from the Trump administration. This is not a story about me. Its about...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — It’s been six months without live theater in Chicago. Now one famed acting group is now getting back on stage in front of an audience. The Goodman Theatre is returning with a series of free outdoor performances of Fannie Lou Hamer, Speak On It!, a play about the life and work of the women’s rights and voting rights activist, who co-founded the Freedom Democratic Party. The 40-minute abridged version of playwright Cheryl L. West’s play will tour Chicago’s neighborhoods for three weeks, with nine performances in September and October, starting Thursday night at Hamilton Park, 513 W. 72nd St., in Englewood. “How ‘woke to the vote’ are we, nearly 60 years after the Voting Rights Act demolished...
    WASHINGTON -- Congress should give the nation's highest civilian honor posthumously to Emmett Till and his mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, a Republican and a Democratic senator said Wednesday.Sens. Richard Burr, R-N.C., and Cory Booker, D-N.J., said the Congressional Gold Medal is long overdue for the Till family.Till was a Black teenager lynched in Mississippi in 1955 by white men who were later acquitted despite eyewitness testimony tying them to the killing. He had been accused of whistling at a white woman.Mamie Till-Mobley demanded an open-casket funeral for her son in Chicago. A photograph of Till's brutalized body galvanized the Civil Rights movement. She remained a Civil Rights activist in honor of her slain son for the rest of her life.SEE ALSO:...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. Vote for Nancy Allen for Pleasanton council I would like to express my support for Nancy Allen for Pleasanton City Council. I am a longtime neighbor of Nancy and I’ve come to know her both professionally (by working directly with her on a nonprofit board) and personally. I have found that Nancy is a creative problem-solver. She carefully studies issues. More importantly, she always focuses on what is in the best interest of Pleasanton as a community. I am impressed that she has pledged not to take any developer donations to her campaign. One important issue that I am sure Nancy will come through on...
    The U.S. attorney for the Western District of Washington issued a statement early Thursday denying an explosive report that claimed Attorney General William Barr asked federal prosecutors to explore whether they could bring criminal charges against Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan for allowing the Capitol Hill Organized Protest (CHOP) police-free protest zone that led to two fatal shootings. Brian T. Moran, the federal prosecutor, said he has had multiple conversations with leadership inside within the Department of Justice and "at no time has anyone at the Department communicated to me that Seattle  Mayor Jenny Durkan is, was or should be charged with any federal crime" related to CHOP. "As U.S.  Attorney I would be aware of such an investigation," he said. BARR SAYS RUMORS TRUMP WOULD REFUSE TO...
    (CNN)Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan on Wednesday said a report that Attorney General William Barr suggested prosecutors consider filing charges against her are "chilling and the latest abuse of power from the Trump administration."Barr, The New York Times reported, asked prosecutors in the Justice Department's civil rights division to investigate if they could charge Durkan as a result of protests this summer, when some protesters established a police-free zone in downtown Seattle. "The Department of Justice cannot become a political weapon operated at the behest of the President to target those who have spoken out against this administration's actions," Durkan, a former US attorney, said in a statement. "That is an act of tyranny, not of democracy.""Ultimately, this is not a...
    A member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Peter Kirsanow said Monday the New York Times’ “1619 Project” is “one of the most significant attempts to propagandize history” he has seen in his lifetime. Kirsanow, a partner with the law firm of Benesch, Friedlander, Coplan & Aronoff, and chair of the board of directors of the Center for New Black Leadership, presented his views at a week-long virtual conference held by the National Association of Scholars (NAS), a nonprofit that “upholds the standards of a liberal arts education that fosters intellectual freedom, searches for the truth, and promotes virtuous citizenship.” During the NAS series titled, “Slavery or Freedom: The Conception of America,” Kirsanow refuted much of the “1619 Project,” the creation...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress should give the nation’s highest civilian honor posthumously to Emmett Till and his mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, a Republican and a Democratic senator said Wednesday. Sens. Richard Burr, R-N.C., and Cory Booker, D-N.J., said the Congressional Gold Medal is long overdue for the Till family. Till was a black teenager lynched in Mississippi in 1955 by white men who were later acquitted despite eyewitness testimony tying them to the killing. He had been accused of whistling at a white woman. Mamie Till-Mobley demanded an open-casket funeral for her son in Chicago. A photograph of Till’s brutalized body galvanized the Civil Rights movement. She remained a Civil Rights activist in honor of her slain son for the rest...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress should give the nation’s highest civilian honor posthumously to Emmett Till and his mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, a Republican and a Democratic senator said Wednesday. Sens. Richard Burr, R-N.C., and Cory Booker, D-N.J., said the Congressional Gold Medal is long overdue for the Till family. Till was a black teenager lynched in Mississippi in 1955 by white men who were later acquitted despite eyewitness testimony tying them to the killing. He had been accused of whistling at a white woman. Mamie Till-Mobley demanded an open-casket funeral for her son in Chicago. A photograph of Till’s brutalized body galvanized the Civil Rights movement. She remained a Civil Rights activist in honor of her slain son for the...
    Civil rights attorney Leo Terrell blasted Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris for not visiting the two Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies who were shot in an ambush-style attack over the weekend. What are the details? On Tuesday, Terrell — who appeared on Fox News' "Hannity" — said that Harris, who made a hospital visit to Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, should have visited the deputies from her own home state. Terrell and host Sean Hannity began by talking about out-of-control demonstrators and rioters. "What do you think of these agitators? They've not been held accountable," Hannity asked Terrell during the Tuesday night exchange. "We always have these high-profile incidents, Ferguson, Baltimore, all...
    Google’s logo doodle on Tuesday honors an Orange County woman who helped lead the fight to end segregation in California schools. In the drawing that appeared on Google’s homepage Sept. 15, a smiling Felicitas Mendez is shown watching a crowd of happy children of all races walk into a school. Her three children, led by her husband Gonzalo, are among them. That image would have been pure fantasy in the early 1940s, when her children were barred from entering a “white” school in Westminster because they were of Mexican descent. Their case, Mendez v. Westminster, led to the end of public school segregation in California and paved the way for the federal Brown v. Board of Education, which ended school...
    Google celebrates the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month in the United States with a “doodle” dedicated to Felicitas Méndez, a Puerto Rican civil rights pioneer and businesswoman. The image of Méndez, made by Emily Barrera, appears this Tuesday on all the main pages of the famous Google search engine. “As a Latina living in the United States, I was delighted to have the opportunity to honor Felicitas. It was amazing to hear how she and her husband, Gonzalo Méndez, led an educational battle against segregated schools in California and how she paved the way for the American movement. of civil rights, “said the artist herself in a statement. Felicitas Méndez helped...
    PALO ALTO, Calif. (KGO) -- A South Bay park is at the center of a lawsuit filed today against the city of Palo Alto.A group of civil rights organizations say they are suing over the residents-only policy at Foothills Park.TAKE ACTION: Get help with your rights to justice, equality and civil libertiesUnder the city ordinance, non-residents who enter the 1,400-acre park face possible jail time and a fine.Those who support opening up the park say the city's political leaders don't have the courage to do it."There's also been a lot of pushback from long-time residents of Palo Alto who want to keep that park exclusive and don't want others, especially people who look like me, going to the park," said...
    Google celebrates the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month in the United States with a “doodle” dedicated to Felicitas Méndez, a Puerto Rican civil rights pioneer and businesswoman. The image of Méndez, made by Emily Barrera, appears this Tuesday on all the main pages of the famous Google search engine. “As a Latina living in the United States, I was delighted to have the opportunity to honor Felicitas. It was amazing to hear how she and her husband, Gonzalo Méndez, led an educational battle against segregated schools in California and how she paved the way for the American movement. of civil rights, “said the artist herself in a statement. Felicitas Méndez helped...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Tuesday was the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month, and Google celebrated it with a doodle of Orange County civil rights icon Felicitas Mendez. To mark the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month, Google displayed a doodle of Orange County civil rights icon Felicitas Mendez. (Courtesy: Google) Back in 1946, Mendez successfully sued the Westminster School District for failing to enroll her Hispanic children in an all white school. The school district alleged that non-white children were kept out of the school due to “language issues,” but testimony from one of the children in the case debunked that claim. The lawsuit led to the desegregation of all public schools and public spaces in the state of...
    Google celebrates the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month in the United States with a “doodle” dedicated to Felicitas Méndez, a Puerto Rican civil rights pioneer and businesswoman. The image of Méndez, made by Emily Barrera, appears this Tuesday on all the main pages of the famous Google search engine. “As a Latina living in the United States, I was delighted to have the opportunity to honor Felicitas. It was amazing to hear how she and her husband, Gonzalo Méndez, led an educational battle against segregated schools in California and how she paved the way for the American movement. of civil rights, “said the artist herself in a statement. Felicitas Méndez helped...
    Felicitas Mendez was honored Tuesday with a Google Doodle celebrating her work as a civil rights pioneer to mark the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month. Mendez, who was born in Puerto Rico in 1916, successfully fought school segregation in California in the 1940s alongside her husband, Gonzalo, a Mexican immigrant. GOOGLE IS FIXING THIS KEY ISSUE ON CHROME BECAUSE OF A SECURITY 'RISK' Their three children in 1944 were denied entry into a school in Westminster, a city in Orange County, because of their ethnicity. Mendez, her husband, and four other families sued the school district in a case that became known as Mendez v. Westminster. In February 1946, a federal district court ruled that the school districts had...
    (CNN)Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off on Tuesday, and Google is fittingly celebrating with a new Google Doodle -- of civil rights pioneer and business owner Felicitas Mendez.Mendez, born in 1916 in Puerto Rico, is most known for her role in suing the school district in the town of Westminster, California, after her children were refused enrollment at a local public school because of their skin color.Mendez married a Mexican immigrant. She and other parents came together demanding the school district allow their Mexican-American children entry into an all-White school.A federal district court in 1946 ruled that school districts were violating Mexican American citizens' rights, and ruled in favor of Mendez and the other parents. The ruling paved the way for...
    Getty U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (R) is presented with the 2010 Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama. Falcons will honor late Civil Rights leader John Lewis as one of their honorary captains on Sunday against the Seattle Seahawks, Dan Quinn told reporters on Friday. “That’s a big deal in terms of the exposure and the impact Congressman Lewis had not just on Georgia but on the country overall,” Quinn told ESPN. Lewis died this past July at the age of 80 after battling pancreatic cancer. A jersey with Lewis’ name will be placed on a seat at the 50-yard line. Ricardo Allen Remembers Marching Alongside Lewis After the senseless death of George Floyd, Falcons’ safety Ricardo Allen flashbacked...
    Civil rights attorney Leo Terrell says Sunny Hostin — a co-host on "The View" — should be ashamed of herself after she said black conservatives were "props' for the Republican Party. What's a brief history here? During a panel discussion earlier this week, Hostin said she wasn't surprised that Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden was losing support among Hispanic voters in Florida, and took it even further. “I actually wasn't surprised to hear it because Cubans in Florida typically do vote Republican," Hostin said of the news. “That wasn't a surprise to me. It wasn't a surprise to me that black voters are overwhelmingly the backbone of the Democratic Party — 83% in favor of Biden."...
    (CNN)When Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1957 63 years ago, legendary Harlem Rep. Adam Clayton Powell Jr. called it "the second emancipation." Kristen ClarkeThe law was the first major civil rights legislation since Reconstruction and helped build the foundational infrastructure for all future civil rights enforcement. Most importantly, it created the civil rights division within the Department of Justice — a division that quickly became a cornerstone for the entire civil rights movement (and the place where I started off my legal career). In the division's earliest days, it prosecuted the case of three civil rights workers murdered in Mississippi in 1964, and helped investigate the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Medgar Evers. One of...
    KIM Kardashian is already planning her return to TV, and may star in a fashion or reality contest series, sources told The Sun. While hit show Keeping Up With the Kardashians is coming to an end following its 20th season, Kim has no intentions of abandoning her onscreen career, insiders insisted. 6Kim Kardashian is serious about returning to reality TVCredit: NBC 6Keeping Up With the Kardashians announced its last season on TuesdayCredit: E! 6Kim is eager to do her own thing after her family-oriented reality showCredit: Facebook/Keeping Up With The Kardashians Despite reports that the reality star wants to walk away from TV to protect husband Kanye West, she is already considering options for a fashion series, a reality...
    A coalition of civil rights groups are calling for Ankhi Das, Facebook’s public policy chief in India, to step down in the face of growing sectarian conflict in India. The 41 groups sent an open letter expressing their objections to Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday, citing an escalating potential for Facebook-fueled violence in the country. “Facebook should not be complicit in more offline violence, much less another genocide, but the pattern of inaction displayed by the company is reckless to the point of complicity,” the groups write. “[We] write to urge you to take decisive action to address Facebook India’s bias and failure to address dangerous content in India.” “Facebook should not be complicit in more offline violence” Signatories include...
    A video uploaded to Reddit shows a woman proudly carrying the mantle for Karens everywhere by throwing an expletive-laden tantrum in a Phoenix nail salon. All over the need to wear a mask. Hide The video, posted on r/PublicFreakout, opens with Karen lecturing another person—presumably an employee—about her refusal to wear a mask in a hostile tone of voice. Hide “Shut the fuck and maybe you’ll learn a lesson,” Karen says. “Don’t start with me. Pick another victim to start with. I’m not her.” “You’re not a victim?” another woman asks Karen. “Exactly fucking right, so shut the fuck up,” Karen says, to which her confronter replies, “You’re a sad, sad woman.” Hide “I’m not sad,” Karen insists....
    Jon Queally September 7, 2020 1:25PM (UTC) This article originally appeared at Common Dreams. It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Feel free to republish and share widely. Civil rights organizations and local governments in California late Friday filed a request in a San Jose federal court for an emergency nationwide injunction against the Trump administration's effort to end 2020 Census counting prematurely—a move critics warn is a blatant effort by the president and his Republican allies to "sabotage" the once-in-a-decade count for long-term political advantage. "Trump seeks to sabotage the #2020Census by TERMINATING critical door knocking operations and other efforts one month early," declared Kristen Clark, president and executive director of the Lawyers Committee for...
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    TIMES SQUARE, Manhattan (WABC) -- Civil Rights activists are demanding for the arrest of the driver who plowed into Black Lives Matter protesters in Times Square.Reverend Kevin McCall and attorney Sanford Rubenstein are calling for the Manhattan District Attorney to open up a criminal investigation and for the driver of the vehicle to be charged.Two people came forward Saturday and spoke with police about the encounter that took place Thursday night, according to Rubenstein.Police say they have identified the owner of a car seen on video driving through the crowd of protesters, and they plan to interview as many people involved as possible.Demonstrators gathered at the Crossroads of the World Friday night, protesting what happened there the day before.Protesters blamed...
    TIMES SQUARE, Manhattan (WABC) -- Civil Rights officials are demanding for the arrest of the driver who plowed into Black Lives Matter protesters in Times Square.Reverend Kevin McCall and attorney Sanford Rubenstein are calling for the Manhattan District Attorney to open up a criminal investigation and for the driver of the vehicle to be charged.Two people came forward Saturday and spoke with police about the encounter that took place Thursday night, according to Rubenstein.Police say they have identified the owner of a car seen on video driving through the crowd of protesters, and they plan to interview as many people involved as possible.Demonstrators gathered at the Crossroads of the World Friday night, protesting what happened there the day before.Protesters blamed...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Ahead of Labor Day, unions representing millions across several working-class sectors are threatening to authorize work stoppages in support of the Black Lives Matter movement amid calls for concrete measures that address racial injustice. In a statement first shared with The Associated Press, labor leaders who represent teachers, autoworkers, truck drivers and clerical staff, among others, signaled a willingness Friday to escalate protest tactics to force local and federal lawmakers to take action on policing reform and systemic racism. They said the walkouts, if they were to move forward with them, would last for as long as needed. “The status quo — of police killing Black people, of armed white nationalists killing demonstrators, of millions sick...
    Sharon Cotrell, the first woman dock worker on the West Coast and a voice of the progressive community in Long Beach for more than 40 years, has died. She was 77. Cotrell died at her home in Long Beach from a heart attack and other complications on Aug. 23, said her sister Gretchen Cotrell. Congressman Alan Lowenthal, D-Long Beach, said Cotrell “cared deeply about our community and making the world a better place for us all.” Cotrell was a friend of the congressman and, he said, a fellow progressive. But she was also Lowenthal’s campaign manager when he first ran for the Long Beach City Council and won in 1992. She also ran campaigns for former Mayor Tom Clark and...
              RICHMOND, Virginia – In the first fully in-person session of the week, the Senate advanced a bill that would establish a civil rights and policing commission on Wednesday. The commission’s purpose is to review civil liberties, civil justice and policing in Virginia, and to make policy recommendations to the General Assembly. Sen. Richard Stuart (R-Prince William county), who introduced the bill, spoke with The Virginia Star about why the commission is necessary. “I’ve practiced law for 30 years now and in that 30 years I have seen the inequities in our system,” Stuart said. “I still believe we have the best system in the world, but I think it is important for all...
    New York Giants Players Are Now Giving Themselves Laps When They Screw Up The World’s Most Colorful Mountains Ben & Jerrys is launching a podcast about white supremacy in America, after calling for civil rights reforms earlier this summer © Provided by Business Insider Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, co-founders of Ben & Jerry's ice cream, unveil their newest flavor, Justice ReMix'd on Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019 in Washington. This flavor launch is part of Ben & Jerry's multi-year campaign for criminal justice reform, in partnership with Advancement Project National Office. The two organizations have worked together in St. Louis to close The Workhouse jail, and in Miami to slow the school-to-prison pipeline. Eric Kayne/ AP Images for Ben &...
    The family of Dijon Kizzee, a Black cyclist who was fatally shot by police in Los Angeles earlier this week after being pursued by local authorities for allegedly committing a vehicle code violation, has retained national civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump. Crump has represented the families of several other Black people who have died in recent months, including some at the hands of police, such as Breonna Taylor in Kentucky and George Floyd in Minneapolis. Other families he's represented include those of Jacob Blake, who was injured in a shooting in Kenosha, Wis., last month, and Ahmaud Arbery, who was killed while jogging in Georgia after an encounter with two men. “Sleeping while Black. Jogging while Black. And now, cycling while Black. Every day another...
    Attorneys in Wisconsin filed a class-action civil rights lawsuit accusing the Kenosha Police Department of selectively enforcing the curfew during the riots last month. The lawsuit was filed on Tuesday on behalf of four of the 69 individuals who were arrested for violating the city's curfew during the riots that took place following the police shooting of Jacob Blake. The lawsuit alleges that the Kenosha Police Department only arrested anti-police violence protesters while allowing the pro-police armed militias to continue to demonstrate past curfew. "In Kenosha, there are two sets of laws — one that applies to those who protest police brutality and racism, and another for those who support the police," the lawsuit stated. "Even though there were...
    Babatunde Olatunji playing drums – circa 1960 Three years before Rosa Parks’ bus boycott, Nigerian drummer Babatunde Olatunji protested against racial segregation in the southern states of America. He was part of a generation of Africans who played an important role in the fight for racial justice in the US – and continue to do so, writes the BBC’s Aaron Akinyemi. “The leaders in the 50s and 60s provide me with a great deal of inspiration,” Nigerian-American activist Opal Tometi, co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, told the BBC. When Martin Luther King Jr delivered his historic I Have a Dream speech during the March on Washington 57 years ago, around 250,000 people attended the event, including prominent...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — The Sacramento Police Department is facing a new lawsuit in the deadly shooting of a man near Sacramento State in July. The family of Jeremy Southern filed a civil rights lawsuit claiming officers “executed” him. Jeremy Southern moments before being shot by police. Attorneys for Southern’s family say police violated their own policies by shooting the 22-year-old rather than continuing to try and de-escalate the situation. Back in July, Sacramento police released body camera footage of the encounter. WATCH: Police Release Body Cam Footage Of Fatal Shooting Near Sac State That Killed Jeremy Southern Southern was believed to be involved in a shooting at the Crossings Apartment Complex a week prior to the incident, police said. Officers...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee now leads the nation in criminalizing common protest tactics, with penalties including the denial of voting rights for pitching a tent on the Capitol grounds. But outrage over racial injustice isn’t going away, and civil rights advocates say the law was pulled from an age-old playbook that hasn’t stood up to history. Just like the Southern politicians who strained to maintain segregation in the 1950s and 60s, contemporary elected leaders vexed by the Occupy Wall Street movement, demonstrations against oil and gas pipelines and this year’s protests against racial injustice have often sought to use the criminal justice system to suppress mass movements. Tennessee’s new law increases penalties, fines and jail time for...
    Sports columnist Jason Whitlock praised the Steelers’s head coach Mike Tomlin for his “clever rebuke” of Black Lives Matter, a group Whitlock described as the “antithesis of Dr. Martin Luther King’s Civil Rights Movement.” “I hope NFL commissioner Roger Goodell sees the video. I hope Goodell’s assistant Troy Vincent sees the video. It’s an example of the kind of leadership that should be coming out of the league office,” Whitlock wrote on Monday of Tomlin’s public speech with players. The coach on Friday addressed protests within the NFL and across the country, which have intensified since the police shooting of Jacob Blake during an arrest on Aug. 23. “This evening, as we go about our normal football business,...
    In the course of the huge housewarming get together, Leti passes by some associates who’re gossiping a few new preacher getting a whole lot of consideration within the Civil Rights combat. The title Martin is dropped and we robotically ought to join the dots that they’re referring to a younger Martin Luther King, Jr. What in addition they say, although, would possibly shock us. Based on them, he was going to marry a white girl however was compelled to marry Coretta Scott King. Now whereas they simplify the storyline, it’s true that MLK had a white girlfriend in school. (He would later meet spouse Coretta whereas pursuing his masters and PhD at Boston College.) The white girlfriend’s title was...
    ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — A judge has rejected a request from Justice Department lawyers to delay a civil lawsuit filed by the parents of a northern Virginia man shot and killed by U.S. Park Police in 2017 after a stop-and-go highway chase. U.S. Senior Judge Claude Hilton ruled that the civil trial will go forward as scheduled in November. Lawyers for the federal government, which is the defendant in the case, say they can’t build a proper defense because the two officers who shot 25-year-old Bijan Ghaisar are invoking their Fifth Amendment rights and refusing to discuss their rationale for opening fire. Federal prosecutors declined to bring criminal charges against the two officers, but Fairfax County Commonwealth’s Attorney Steve Descano...
    Longtime Democratic state Rep. John J. DeBerry, Jr. says he’s “appalled” that some are comparing activists from the civil rights movement with Black Lives Matter protesters. "I'm appalled when folks want to call this stuff that's happening now and compare it to the civil rights movement when there is absolutely no comparison," DeBerry, a black politician from Tennessee, told Fox News. The Memphis Democrat argued that civil rights protesters were people of “class and character.” "They put on their shirts and their ties and their Sunday dresses, as they called them, they looked the part," DeBerry added. “I'm not saying there was a dress code. I'm saying that they were going to dispel any stereotype that might be...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY MAKINI BRICE AND NANDITA BOSE Thousands of people took part in a march in Washington on Friday to denounce racism, on the anniversary of the march in 1963 where civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr made his historic “I Have a Dream” speech. “You might have killed the dreamer, but you can’t kill the dream,” civil rights leader Reverend Al Sharpton told Friday’s crowd. Activists and politicians gave speeches, including Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris, who appeared in a recorded video. Many referenced the late Congressman John Lewis, a civil rights hero who spoke at the 1963 march...
    Civil rights attorney Leo Terrell ripped the leaders of the Democratic Party on "Hannity" Friday, saying that it is insulting and disingenuous for Joe Biden and others to suddenly claim they are the protectors of law and order after months of unrest. "This is the reason why I am voting Republican for the first time," Terrell said in response to violent demonstrations outside the White House on the final night of the Republican National Convention. A number of lawmakers, including Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and Georgia Democratic Rep. Vernon Jones were confronted and accosted as they left the White House grounds. KELLEY PAUL RECALLS ATTACK BY 'BLOODTHIRSTY MOB' OUTSIDE WHITE HOUSE Video"What you just saw last night with Rand Paul and Vernon Jones -- it doesn't make...
    SAN JOSE (CBS SF) — Silicon Valley Pride kicks off a virtual celebration Saturday that highlights the organization’s concern and solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and nationwide protests for racial justice. “We are just echoing what this country is feeling right now — this need for change and for equal rights across all color lines and sexual orientation,” says Nicole Altamirano, Silicon Valley Pride Interim CEO. Silicon Valley Pride’s organizers said they’ve been scrambling for the past few months to convert their traditional, in-person parade and celebration into an online event. Organizers say this year’s event unfolds against the backdrop of ongoing protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd while in the custody of Minneapolis Police. “I...
    When Americans think of the Civil Rights Movement, they think of icons like Martin Luther King Jr. and John Lewis — men with such a gift for oration that the words of their speeches are forever ingrained in American history. Today, however, there is no central leader unifying the marches and rallies for racial justice across America.  There is no shortage of passionate young activists, nor is there a shortage of inspiration for change. The makeup of the movement simply looks different. And while it is often criticized for being decentralized, some of the young activists at its core tell CBS News that that's actually by design. "I think that this movement doesn't need a central leader," 23-year-old Chelsea Miller, who...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Eight years to the day before Martin Luther King Jr. marched on Washington to give his "I Have a Dream" speech, 14-year-old Emmett Till was lynched and thrown from a Mississippi bridge for allegedly whistling at a white woman.Friday marked 65 years since the Chicago teen was murdered by Southern racists, sparking a turning point in the civil rights movement.Now on the anniversary of not only his death but also King Jr.'s speech, Till's cousin is speaking out about the pain she still lives with following his loss.March on Washington 2020: Hundreds cancel trip to work towards change at home due to COVID-19EMBED More News Videos There are hundreds of Chicagoans who wanted to go to the...
    (CNN)Exactly 57 years after the 1963 civil rights march on Washington, thousands descended on the National Mall to again call for ending police violence, dismantling systemic racism and ensuring access to the ballot box."We're marching to overcome what my father called the triple evils of poverty, racism and violence," Martin Luther King III said at the event. He was 5 when his father delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the first March on Washington. This time around, participants were told to mask up and social-distance -- an effort to stem the pandemic that continues to disproportionately affect Black and brown communities and has so far killed at least 181,000 Americans.It's an exclamation mark ending an unprecedented week in...
    Reuters August 28, 2020 0 Comments Thousands of people took part in a march in Washington on Friday to denounce racism, on the anniversary of the march in 1963 where civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr made his historic ‘I Have a Dream’ speech. “You might have killed the dreamer, but you can’t kill the dream,” civil rights leader Reverend Al Sharpton told Friday’s crowd. Activists and politicians gave speeches, including Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris, who appeared in a recorded video. Many referenced John Lewis, the late lawmaker, who spoke at the 1963 march. They also referred to the importance of voting in November’s election and the links between activism for Black civil rights, disability rights...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation is once again at a crossroads over racial inequity, marking the 57th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream Speech,” yet torn apart by the Black Lives Matter protests against the police shooting of another Black man, this time in Wisconsin. Friday’s commemoration of the 1963 March on Washington comes as a new Civil Rights era is unfolding in real time in Kenosha, Wisconsin, after Sunday’s shooting of Jacob Blake. He now joins a growing list of Black Americans whose treatment by law enforcement has sparked worldwide protests, echoing King’s speech at the Lincoln Memorial, where he said, “We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the...
    A Tennessee lawmaker whose family was steeped in the civil rights movement said he's "appalled" by comparisons between the peaceful protests that Martin Luther King Jr. led and the destructive demonstrations that have broken out across the nation today. "I'm appalled when folks want to call this stuff that's happening now and compare it to the civil rights movement when there is absolutely no comparison," state Rep. John J. DeBerry, Jr., a longtime Memphis Democrat who is Black, told Fox News. TENNESSEE DEM LAWMAKER DECRIES RESPONSE TO RIOTS IN VIRAL SPEECH: 'WHAT WE SEE IS NOT PEACEFUL' DeBerry noted King's Christian faith that rooted his convictions and the decorum of the marchers of the civil rights movement in the 1960s. "They put on their...
    The sister of George Floyd, whose death in police custody sparked months of racial turmoil across the US, has urged civil rights protesters to "be his legacy" as thousands gathered for a rally in Washington DC. "My brother cannot be a voice today," said Bridgett Floyd. "We have to be that voice, we have to be the change". Ms Floyd was one of several relatives of black Americans harmed or killed by police to address the event commemorating a historic 1963 civil rights march. Speakers demanded racial justice and urged people to vote. Jacob Blake Sr, whose son was shot in Wisconsin on Sunday, told the rally they were holding court on racism in America - and the verdict was...
    Kenosha shooting, DC protest: Kyle Rittenhouse to remain in Illinois as thousands descend on Washington Looking for solution to winter outdoor dining, Chicago launches contest with $5K prize Why a civil rights-related NFL players strike in 2020 is a real possibility The NFL’s decision to cancel the preseason due to COVID-related health concerns was the right move to make, but it also saved the league from the possibility that, as has happened in the NBA, WNBA, and in Major League Baseball, players would make the decision to opt out of playing games because they feel their voices need to be heard as they relate to civil rights in general, and police brutality against people of color specifically. © Provided...
    Civil rights activist the Reverend Al Sharpton, speaking Friday to thousands who had gathered in Washington to march against police brutality and in support of criminal justice reform, said the U.S. needs to have “a new conversation” about the systemic racism he says continues to plague America. “We’ve had the conversation for decades. It’s time we have a conversation with America,” Sharpton said. “We need to have a conversation about your racism, about your bigotry, about your hate, about how you would put your knee on our neck while we cry for our lives.” Sharpton’s remarks were made at the "Get Your Knee Off Our Necks March" at the Lincoln Memorial, which Sharpton’s National Action Network and others began to...
    WASHINGTON -- Capping a week of protests and outrage over the police shooting of a Black man in Wisconsin, civil rights advocates will highlight the scourge of police and vigilante violence against Black Americans at a commemoration of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.Thousands are expected at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Friday, where the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his historic "I Have A Dream" address, a vision of racial equality that remains elusive for millions of Americans.And they are gathering on the heels of yet another shooting by a white police officer of a Black man - this time, 29-year-old Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, last Sunday - sparking days of protests...