2020-09-25@06:06:15 GMT
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environmental law:

    By SAM METZ, AP/Report for America CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Officials in a rural Nevada county with significant mining assets wants state lawmakers to carve out an exemption in the state's Open Meeting Law to allow them to discuss environmental assessments before the reports are released to the public. Members of the Legislature’s Public Lands Committee voted 7-1 on Tuesday to draft a bill that would provide the exemption that could affect massive mining projects under environmental review. The bill would allow local officials to hold closed meetings with federal agencies during the “pre-decisional” phase of projects undergoing environmental impact reviews required by the National Environmental Policy Act. Eureka County Natural Resource Manager Jake Tibbitts said the proposal would...
    RIDGELAND, S.C. (AP) — Environmental groups threatened to sue a wood pellet factory on Tuesday, accusing it of releasing more than 100 tons of air pollution a year in violation of the Clean Air Act. A legal notice filed against Jasper Pellets says the plant in Ridgeland is operating equipment without a federal permit that is required because of the amount of pollutants it emits. The factory turns raw wood into compressed pellets to fuel power plants, many of them overseas. The South Carolina Coastal Conservation League, represented by The Environmental Integrity Project and the Southern Environmental Law Center, said the factory emits more than 100 tons yearly of volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, which can produce ozone and smog...
    TRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork) – New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signed into law Friday landmark environmental justice legislation. The law mandates new requirements for facilities that produce large amounts of air pollution in order to build or expand near low-income and minority communities. “No longer will economically disadvantaged areas of our state be dumping grounds, and no longer will the rights of residents to clean air and clean water be overlooked,” Murphy said. Under the law, facilities including incinerators, sewage treatment plants and scrap metal companies, must submit environmental impact statements and hold public hearings in order to apply for permits. You can get the latest news, sports and weather on our brand new CBS New York app. Download here.
    Reuters August 31, 2020 0 Comments More than 20 states sued the Trump administration on Friday over its plan to curtail environmental regulations in permitting infrastructure projects that can take years to complete and have long-lasting consequences on land and communities. Led by California and Washington, the lawsuit seeks to block changes the administration has proposed to how the 50-year-old National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is implemented. It was filed in federal court in San Francisco against the White House Council on Environmental Quality and its chairman, Mary Neumayr. NEPA requires that prior to permitting a project, federal agencies assess its environmental effects, a process many industries have criticized as lengthy and onerous. U.S. President Donald Trump announced the...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison joined a coalition of 22 states, territories, and local agencies in suing the Trump Administration challenging unlawful changes to federal environmental laws enacted over 50 years ago. On July 15, 2020, the Trump Administration’s Council on Environmental Quality announced a final rule upending the requirement that federal agencies review and assess the impact of their actions on the environment and public health. Ultimately, this allows agencies to take actions without considering the impact it will have on climate change, vulnerable communities, water and air quality and endangered wildlife. In addition, the final rule limits public participation in the review process, robbing communities of the opportunity to have their voices heard on actions that...
    BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey joined a coalition of 27 states, territories, cities and agencies in suing the Trump administration over what she said was an effort to gut a law requiring that federal agencies comprehensively assess the impact of their actions on the environment. The complaint was filed in the Northern District of California on Friday by Democratic state attorneys general and argues the administration’s rule violates the National Environmental Policy Act. Healey, a Democrat, said the Trump administration rule will drastically curtail environmental reviews for projects undertaken, permitted, or funded by nearly every federal agency. She said the rule will also have serious repercussions for states by causing inadequate consideration of climate and environmental justice...
    More than 20 states sued the Trump administration on Friday over its plan to curtail environmental regulations in permitting infrastructure projects that can take years to complete and have long-lasting consequences on land and communities. Led by California and Washington, the lawsuit seeks to block changes the administration has proposed to how the 50-year-old National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is implemented. It was filed in federal court in San Francisco against the White House Council on Environmental Quality and its chairman, Mary Neumayr. NEPA requires that prior to permitting a project, federal agencies assess its environmental effects, a process many industries have criticized as lengthy and onerous. FILE - President Donald Trump speaks on proposed changes to the National...
    A coalition of 21 states sued the Trump administration on Friday for rolling back what they say is a “rule that is, at its heart, the gutting” of America’s bedrock environmental law. The White House in July finalized a rollback of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which for 50 years has required the government to weigh environmental and community concerns before approving pipelines, highways, drilling permits, new factories or any major action on federal lands. Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson (D) called the law the Magna Carta of environmental law. “NEPA requires something basic, but very important from the federal government,” he said. “It basically requires the federal government to look before they leap. Pretty straightforward. Look at the...
    A federal appeals court on Wednesday reversed a judge's prior order that had shut down the Dakota Access Pipeline pending a full environmental review. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit sided with pipeline owner Energy Transfer to keep the oil flowing, saying a lower-court judge 'did not make the findings necessary for injunctive relief.' But the appellate court declined to grant Energy Transfer's motion to block the review, saying the company had 'failed to make a strong showing of likely success.' The ruling comes as a blow to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, which was at the center of massive protests against the pipeline in 2016 and 2017, based on concerns about the pipeline's impact on...
    Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump signed a measure Tuesday that will fully fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund -- a program his administration's budget proposals had repeatedly tried to cut. The legislation signing marks an important political win for Republican Sens. Cory Gardner of Colorado and Steve Daines of Montana, who both hail from conservation-minded states and face tough reelection races this November. The Great American Outdoors Act passed with bipartisan support, but no Democrats were invited to the event. Instead, Trump largely credited Daines and Gardner for its passage. In addition to funding the Land and Water Conservation Fund, a federal program which is aimed at protecting federal public lands and waters, the act also addresses a maintenance backlog...
    On Wednesday, July 15, President Trump finalized his rollback of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), one of the nation’s most significant environmental laws. The administration’s new regulations are expected to reduce the number of projects that will be subject to NEPA review and shorten the timeline for reviews and permits. The changes are meant to speed up federal projects such as mines, highways, and pipelines without consideration of the environmental effects of projects, such as their contribution to climate change. For fifty years, NEPA has protected the environment and local communities from harmful federal projects. This act serves as a check on federal action: requiring the government to examine environmental impacts, consider public health concerns, and give the...
    President Donald Trump announced Wednesday that he is rolling back a foundational Nixon-era environmental law that he says stifles infrastructure projects, but that is credited with keeping big construction projects from fouling up the environment and ensuring there is public input on major projects."Together we're reclaiming America's proud heritage as a nation of builders and a nation that can get things done," Trump said.Trump was in Atlanta to announce changes to National Environmental Policy Act regulations for how and when authorities must conduct environmental reviews, making it easier to build highways, pipelines, chemical and solar plants and other projects.The 1970 law changed environmental oversight in the United States by requiring federal agencies to consider whether a project would harm the...
    President Trump finalized a major overhaul Wednesday of one of the country’s most consequential environmental laws on the grounds that it has slowed the construction of highways, pipelines and other major projects across the country. The sweeping changes to the 50-year-old National Environmental Policy Act, which opponents have vowed to fight in court and reverse if Democrats regain control of the executive and legislative branches this fall, underscore the stakes in this year’s election. “This is a truly historic breakthrough,” Trump said Wednesday afternoon at an event at a United Parcel Service hub in Atlanta where he announced the move. He added: “Together, we’re reclaiming America’s proud heritage as a nation of builders and a nation that can get things...
    Tom McKay18 minutes ago•Filed to:National Environmental Policy ActNational Environmental Policy ActNEPAEnvironmentConservationPollutionPipelinesDonald TrumpSaveThe Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and allies protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline in September 2016.Photo: Robyn Beck/AFP (Getty Images) On Wednesday, Donald Trump’s administration eviscerated a key law that requires federal agencies assess the environmental impact of planned projects, likely making it far more difficult to block the construction of new gas and oil pipelines, mines, highways, and other infrastructure. Trump pitched his “top to bottom overhaul” of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), signed into law by Richard Nixon in 1970, as removing “mountains and mountains of bureaucratic red tape,” according to NPR. What NEPA actually does is ensure that all environmental impacts of...
    President Trump announced Wednesday that he is rolling back a foundational Nixon-era environmental law that he said stifles infrastructure projects, but that is credited with keeping big construction projects from fouling up the environment and ensuring there is public input on major projects. "Together we're reclaiming America's proud heritage as a nation of builders and a nation that can get things done," Mr. Trump said. Mr. Trump was in Atlanta to announce changes to National Environmental Policy Act regulations for how and when authorities must conduct environmental reviews, making it easier to build highways, pipelines, chemical and solar plants and other projects. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox The 1970 law changed environmental oversight in the United States...
    President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced that his administration has finalized the overhaul of a key environmental law to help clear the way for major construction projects like oil pipelines, factories and highways. [ READ: Pipeline Project Losses Raise Questions About Industry's Future ]The changes to the implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act remove requirements to consider climate change before moving forward on a project and aim to speed up environmental reviews, which can take years to complete. But critics say the changes will gut the 50-year-old law and hurt the environment and communities. Trump painted the action on NEPA, which requires the federal government to assess the environmental impact of a proposed project as well as gather public input...
    WHITE HOUSE - U.S. President Donald Trump has unveiled a top-to-bottom overhaul of the review process for infrastructure projects that critics contend causes major cracks in bedrock conservations laws.   “This is something that nobody thought was possible,” Trump said on the outskirts of Atlanta’s airport on Wednesday, contending that “horrible roadblocks” due to environmental regulations had cost “trillions of dollars” over the years.   The president said his new rule “completely modernizes the approval review process under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969,” which will cut the timeline for major projects, including highways, from up to 20 years down to two years or less.   FILE - Heavy traffic traveling northbound on Interstate 75 moves slowly, in Forrest Park, south of Atlanta, Sept. 8, 2017.“You’re not going to...
    Reuters July 15, 2020 0 Comments  President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced final plans to expedite permitting for infrastructure like oil pipelines and road expansions, a move that critics say will sidestep the need for public input, especially from low-income and minority communities. The proposal to change how the 50-year-old bedrock National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is implemented is part of Trump’s broader campaign to curtail environmental regulations to boost industry and fast-track projects that can take years to complete. Among other things, the final rule says that federal agencies need not factor in the “cumulative impacts” of a project, which could include its impact on climate change and have significant and long-lasting consequences. “Today’s action is part of...
    US President Donald Trump has announced alterations to a landmark environmental law, in a controversial move to allow projects to go ahead with less oversight. Mr Trump touted changes to the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) as a "historic breakthrough". He said they would speed up reviews of major infrastructure projects. But critics say the changes amount to the dismantling of the 50-year-old law and are a giveaway to polluters. Signed into law by President Richard Nixon in 1970, the NEPA is considered to be the bedrock of environmental safeguards in the US. Under the law, federal agencies are required to be transparent and consult with the public before embarking on infrastructure projects that could impact the environment. But under...
    The White House finalized its rollback of one of the nation’s bedrock environmental laws Wednesday, with President TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump pitches Goya Foods products on Twitter Sessions defends recusal: 'I leave elected office with my integrity intact' Former White House physician Ronny Jackson wins Texas runoff MORE calling the law the “single biggest obstacle” to major construction projects. Critics say the rollback will gut the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which for 50 years has required the government to weigh environmental and community concerns before approving pipelines, highways, drilling permits, new factories or any major action on federal lands. The changes from the Trump administration aim to streamline environmental reviews that industry complains can take years to complete. The...
    President Donald Trump arrives at a campaign rally at the BOK Center, June 20, 2020 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) The Donald Trump administration continues its habit of undoing policies set to protect the people who need it most. Most recently, the president is expected to undo an environmental law set in the 1970s. READ MORE: Trump administration orders hospitals to bypass CDC, send virus info to DC database The Hill reports modifications to the 1970  National Environmental Policy Act are being proposed by the Trump administration to cut regulations and expedite projects. NEPA protects communities by mandating environmental reviews of construction projects and pipelines. Donald Trump(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) Introduced in January,...
    President Donald Trump speaks during an event to announce proposed rollbacks to the National Environmental Policy Act regulations in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, January 9, 2020.Kevin Lamarque | Reuters President Donald Trump on Wednesday will finalize a rollback to the country's landmark environmental law, the National Environmental Policy Act, by speeding up approval for federal projects like pipelines, highways and power plants.  NEPA was signed into law by President Richard Nixon 50 years ago and requires federal agencies to consider the environmental consequences of infrastructure projects before they are approved. The law has also been vital in allowing communities to weigh in on how such projects impact climate change and their own health and safety.  In a major...
    Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump is expected to announce regulatory changes to the National Environmental Policy Act on Wednesday, a change that will speed up approval of federal projects such as mines, highways, water infrastructure, and gas pipelines -- effectively weakening what's considered to be a landmark conservation law. Trump is slated to announce the implementation of the new regulations in Georgia at the UPS Hapeville Airport Hub, which is set to benefit from the expedited review of a highway expansion project that will allow the hub's operations to be more efficient, according to a White House official.The regulatory changes, according to the official, "will modernize, simplify and accelerate the environmental review process necessary to build a wide range of projects...
    By Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump is expected to announce his final plans to expedite permitting for major infrastructure like oil pipelines and road expansions in Atlanta on Wednesday, a move that environmentalists say will bypass public input. The proposal to update how the 50-year old bedrock National Environmental Protection Act (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-climate-nepa/white-house-unveils-plan-to-speed-big-projects-permits-idUSKBN1Z81IM) (NEPA) is implemented is part of Trump’s broader campaign to cut environmental regulation to boost industry and fast-track projects that often take years to complete - an effort that has been blocked or slowed down by courts. Just last week (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-pipelines/end-of-an-era-series-of-u-s-setbacks-bodes-ill-for-big-oil-gas-pipeline-projects-idUSKBN2491M5), a federal judge ordered the Dakota Access pipeline to shut down because the Army Corps of Engineers had failed to do an adequate NEPA...
    By The Associated Press Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. CONSTRUCTION MADE EASIER President Trump is expected to announce a shorter environmental review process for proposed highways, gas pipelines and other major infrastructure. Critics say the move dismantles a 50-year-old environmental protection law. 2. FOR SOME EYES ONLY Video from the body cameras of two officers charged in George Floyd’s death is being made available for public viewing by appointment, but for now news organizations can't publish the footage. 3. UNREST UNSETTLES PORTLAND Nightly protests devolved into violent clashes with police have prompted soul-searching in the Oregon city that prides itself on its progressive reputation. 4. BALLOT BOX...
    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today: 1. CONSTRUCTION MADE EASIER President Trump is expected to announce a shorter environmental review process for proposed highways, gas pipelines and other major infrastructure. Critics say the move dismantles a 50-year-old environmental protection law. 2. FOR SOME EYES ONLY Video from the body cameras of two officers charged in George Floyd’s death is being made available for public viewing by appointment, but for now news organizations can’t publish the footage. 3. UNREST UNSETTLES PORTLAND Nightly protests devolved into violent clashes with police have prompted soul-searching in the Oregon city that prides itself on its progressive reputation. 4. BALLOT BOX DEFIANCE Hundreds...
    MOSCOW (Reuters) - President Vladimir Putin on Monday signed legislation requiring companies involved in oil production or handling other hydrocarbons to have adequate resources for a contingency plan in the case of a spill. The law makes it mandatory for companies to have sufficient financial reserves to prevent potential spills or clean them up if they occur. The financial reserves can take various forms, including an insurance contract or a letter of guarantee to pay the damage from a given accident. The law also requires companies handling hydrocarbons to draw up plans to prevent and clean up spills by Jan. 1, 2024. In late May, a fuel tank at a power station in the Arctic city of Norilsk leaked 21,000...
    PHOTO BY COLIN WOLFGov. Ron DeSantis signed into law Tuesday measures that include bigger fines for dumping pollutants into waterways and new rules for septic tanks and agricultural runoff, though environmentalists said the rules don’t go far enough. One of the measures (HB 1091) makes numerous changes in the amounts and duration of penalties for violating environmental laws. The other bill (SB 712) is based off recommendations from the state’s Blue-Green Algae Task Force and has been dubbed the “Clean Waterways Act.” Both take effect Wednesday. “All these changes are really a strong step forward for Florida's environment. Certainly, one of the most significant pieces of substantive legislation in quite some time,” DeSantis said before signing the bills while at...