2020-10-01@23:04:19 GMT
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executive orders:

    President Trump signed an executive order declaring a national emergency in the mining industry, ordering the Interior Department to increase domestic production of rare-earth materials to reduce the country’s dependence on China. The president signed the order on his way to a campaign rally Wednesday in Minnesota that seeks to use the Defense Production Act, which the administration used to step up the production of medical equipment during the coronavirus outbreak. The order states, “our Nation’s undue reliance on critical minerals, in processed or unprocessed form, from foreign adversaries constitutes an unusual and extraordinary threat, which has its source in substantial part outside the United States, to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States. I hereby...
    Biden said all Trump has are executive orders that 'have no power.' Democratic nominee Joe Biden slammed Donald Trump for trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act without having any plan to replace it — a move that would cause millions of people to lose their insurance, and leave millions more with preexisting conditions unable to find coverage. "He has no plan for health care," Biden said, as Trump repeatedly interrupted. "He sends out wishful thinking. He sends out executive orders that have no power. He hasn't lowered drug costs for anybody. he has been promising health care plan since he got elected. He has none. Like almost everything else he talks about...
    By Alexandra Alper, Michael Erman and Steve Holland | Reuters CHARLOTTE, N.C. – President Donald Trump on Thursday signed two executive orders on healthcare for Americans that lawyers said will carry little weight, as the president seeks to boost his flagging credibility with voters on the hot-button issue ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election. Trump signed the twin orders implementing his “America First Healthcare Plan” in an airport hangar in Charlotte, North Carolina, amid an audience that included medical professionals seated socially distanced and many wearing masks amid the coronavirus pandemic. “Under my plan 33 million Medicare beneficiaries will soon receive a card in the mail containing $200 that they can use to help pay for prescription drugs,”...
    Reuters September 24, 2020 0 Comments U.S. President Donald Trump on Thursday signed two executive orders on healthcare for Americans that lawyers said will carry little weight, as the president seeks to boost his flagging credibility with voters on the hot-button issue ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election. Trump signed the twin orders implementing his “America First Healthcare Plan” in an airport hangar in Charlotte, North Carolina, amid an audience that included medical professionals seated socially distanced and many wearing masks amid the coronavirus pandemic. “Under my plan 33 million Medicare beneficiaries will soon receive a card in the mail containing $200 that they can use to help pay for prescription drugs,” Trump said in describing part of...
    President Trump touted a new healthcare reform plan Thursday in the swing state of North Carolina, but what he laid out consisted mostly of executive orders that would lack the force of law. Nor did he lay out a comprehensive proposal for legislation. “Under the America First healthcare plan, we will ensure the highest standard of care anywhere in the world … and true health security for you and your loved ones, and we will do it rapidly, and it's in very good order,” Trump said. With the election just over a month away, Trump has not laid out a legislative plan to replace Obamacare. At the same time, his administration has sought to have the healthcare...
    President Donald Trump will unveil and sign a series of executive orders Thursday in North Carolina that will make up the body of his “America First” health care plan. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services administration Seema Verna, and Domestic Policy Council Director Brooke Rollins all spoke on the plan during a briefing with reporters ahead of Trump’s scheduled unveiling. All three claimed that the plan will fulfill three core tenants: lowering costs for patients, presenting them with more care options and increasing the quality of care offered. (RELATED: Trump Admin Calls On SCOTUS To Overturn Affordable Care Act) WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 24: U.S. President Donald Trump departs the White House September...
    U.S. President Donald Trump speaks while hosting an event commemorating the repatriation of Native American remains and artifacts from Finland in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, September 17, 2020.Kevin Lamarque | Reuters President Donald Trump will sign a series of executive orders aimed at protecting people with preexisting conditions and preventing surprise medical bills, senior administration officials said Thursday. Trump is expected to discuss the executive orders, which are part of his "America First" health-care plan, during his visit to Charlotte, North Carolina later Thursday, the officials said. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told reporters on a conference call that one of the orders would declare it the policy of the United States to "provide...
    President Trump is preparing to issue a series of executive actions on health care "in the weeks ahead" as his administration fights to repeal the Affordable Care Act in the Supreme Court, Vice President Mike Pence said. During an interview with "CBS Evening News" on Tuesday, Pence defended the White House-backed legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act, the landmark health law also known as ObamaCare. The lawsuit has drawn increased scrutiny following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a stalwart of the court's liberal bloc, on Friday. Trump and other Republican leaders indicated after Ginsburg's death that they intended to move forward with filling the court's vacancy. GINSBURG DEATH CASTS FRESH UNCERTAINTY ON THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT'S FUTURE Senate Majority...
    Virginians could face civil fines up to $500 for violating the governor’s emergency executive orders through legislation advancing through the House and the Senate. A House committee Monday advanced Senate Bill 5117, which establishes the civil penalty. The penalty would apply to the governor’s COVID-19-related executive orders and any other order associated with a state of emergency. The bill already has passed the Senate. A Senate committee advanced the House version of the bill, House Bill 5093, last week. Current law allows for someone to be charged with a Class 1 misdemeanor for violating one of the governor’s executive orders, which is subject to a penalty of one year in jail and up to a $2,500 fine....
    Legislation that would grant more flexibility for enforcement of Gov. Ralph Northam’s executive orders through the addition of civil penalties for violations advanced in the Virginia Senate on Friday with bipartisan support. House Bill 5093, sponsored by Del. Vivian Watts, D-Annandale, would apply to executive orders that are imposed through the director of emergency management during a state emergency, which includes the governor’s COVID-19 orders. The civil penalty could not exceed more than $500. Under current law, the only penalty for violating these orders is a Class 1 misdemeanor, which is punishable by a year in jail and up to a $2,500 fine. Although the bill would permit the state to impose softer penalties, its critics have...
              In an interview with The Star Tribune, Governor Tim Walz set the first standards for possibly lifting Minnesota’s emergency executive orders. His statement didn’t promise total relinquishment of his executive powers. According to Walz, under 20 percent community spread and 4 percent test positivity rate would give Minnesota “a really good chance of doing most things.” The governor balked when questioned whether some of the restrictions were too harsh. Walz stated that his state has endured COVID-19 better than many states. Walz also stated his regrets for not issuing a statewide mask mandate earlier. The governor said that the state has been enduring a long, steady increase of cases. “This isn’t even a plateau....
    For a Joe Biden White House, the toughest part of remaking U.S. immigration policy may actually be figuring out where to start. President Trump has taken more than 400 executive actions on this one issue alone since taking office in January 2017, according to nonpartisan think tank the Migration Policy Institute. Undoing Trump’s immigration framework is not as simple as reversing what his administration has done, yet Biden's desired reforms cannot be made without first doing so. “They really have to come in, from my perspective, with a basic understanding that the damage that the Trump administration has done to the immigration system is immense and that they’ve done it through a large set of sometimes interconnected, sometimes independent...
    President Trump signed an executive order Sunday to lower the cost of prescription drugs, he revealed on Twitter. Trump announced that the aim of the order is to reduce prices to give America “the same low price Big Pharma gives to other countries.” “Just signed a new Executive Order to LOWER DRUG PRICES! My Most Favored Nation order will ensure that our Country gets the same low price Big Pharma gives to other countries,” the president tweeted. “The days of global freeriding at America’s expense are over...” “...and prices are coming down FAST! Also just ended all rebates to middlemen, further reducing prices,” he added in a follow-up tweet. The Trump administration has regularly placed drug costs at the heart of its health...
              A viral post from The Coffee Nest shared it was forced to close after the state threatened the local business with imprisonment, fines, and more. They have since deleted the post, citing an influx of private hate messages. Most commenters expressed frustration over the negative impacts of Governor Tim Walz’s executive orders. The owners issued this statement to The Minnesota Sun: “Our customers and community are at the forefront of every business decision we make. Our state inspections have shown that we have always taken cleanliness and sanitation very seriously. We chose to operate our small business while not adhering to our government’s overreach by Governor Walz. We believe his mandates are illegal and...
    CBS Detroit – The Michigan Supreme Court heard oral arguments today to determine if Governor Whitmer has the authority to continue the state of emergency without the approval of the Legislature. In a report by the Detroit News, Amy Murphy an attorney for the Mackinac Center for Public Policy who is representing medical groups affected by the Governor’s executive orders argued in court Whitmer lacks authority under the 1945 Emergency Powers of the Governor Act. Saying that the 1945 law lacks any reference to epidemics or public health, and the word “emergency” in of itself implies a time limit. As a 28-day limit exists in the 1976 law, Murphy argued that should also exist in the 1945 one as well....
    Victoria Knight September 8, 2020 9:00AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Kaiser Health News. President Donald Trump has long considered lowering the high cost of prescription drugs to be one of his signature issues, and it is likely to be a talking point he relies on throughout the upcoming campaign. During his afternoon speech Monday ― delivered on the first day of the Repubublican National Convention after delegates had unanimously renominated him to seek reelection ― he returned to this theme. : "Now, I'm really doing it," he said, referring to a series of four executive orders he issued in July. These orders touched on a range of issues, including insulin prices and drug importation. He focused on...
              The Ohio Senate passed two bills and discussed a third this week that would “check and balance” state executive orders. The two passed bills would limit essential workers’ liability for COVID-19 transmissions and grant $650 million of federal relief funds statewide, respectively. The controversial bill to reign in the executive and open up the state remains under review. Senate Bill (SB) 311 aims to install a balance of powers between Congress and Ohio’s Department of Health (DOH) during this and any future pandemics. In an interview with The Ohio Star, Senator Andrew Brenner (R-OH-19) explained the historical rationale behind the bill. “In the 1800s, the original purpose of granting executive power for health...
              University of Tennesse at Knoxville (UTK) Law Professor Glenn Reynolds on Thursday spoke to members of the Tennessee General Assembly about various topics, including a governor’s use of executive orders and the reasoning behind him having such power. His appearance was before the Legislature’s Ad Hoc Committee to Study Emergency Powers. Reynolds’s biography with the UTK, available here, lists his interests as law and technology and constitutional law issues. He is the co-author of Outer Space: Problems of Law and Policy. In tune with the music industry, Reynolds is a songwriter and producer for bands including Mobius Dick. Reynolds wrote briefly about his experience with the General Assembly. That is available on PJ...
    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A Ramsey County judge has dismissed a lawsuit challenging Gov. Tim Walz’s executive orders during the coronavirus pandemic. Thirteen Republican legislators and a group of businesses contended the Democratic governor abused his power and interfered with the legislative process when he closed schools, issued a mask mandate and limited businesses’ operations. District Court Judge Thomas Gilligan upheld the governor’s actions Tuesday. A group called Free Minnesota Small Business Coalition argued the governor is usurping the powers of the Legislature. The Walz administration and DFL legislators have maintained that an emergency declaration is necessary to deal with the pandemic. (© Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten...
    With seasonally adjusted initial jobless claims totaling 881,000 last week, millions of Americans are still in need of financial assistance from the federal government. Congressional Democrats and the Trump administration are deadlocked, leaving Americans unsure if more help will arrive soon. Less than a month ago, President Donald Trump tried to do it on his own when he signed four executive measures related to unemployment benefits, payroll tax holiday, student loan deferment and federal eviction protections.   "The only one of these executive orders that spends money or reduces taxes and has any fiscal effect is the one concerning unemployment," said David Super, a constitutional law professor at Georgetown University. "I don't think it is constitutional, but to try to claim that...
    The White House is touting President Donald Trump’s attempts to use executive orders to address the coronavirus pandemic, with administration officials pointing to Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s decision to use a non-socially distanced California hair salon. Pelosi was caught on tape mask-less and receiving an indoor hair cut at a salon that opened specifically for her on Monday. “It is stunningly hypocritical that Speaker Pelosi continues to hold up $1.3 trillion dollars in coronavirus aid while getting special access to the very businesses it would help,” White House Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Matthews told the Daily Caller on Wednesday. “However, while she continues to abdicate in her most basic responsibility to the nation during this unprecedented pandemic, Americans can rest assured...
    A Ramsey County judge on Tuesday dismissed a challenge to Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz’s executive orders aimed at combating the coronavirus, saying the governor was warranted in bringing them in the face of a global pandemic. Second Judicial Circuit Judge Thomas Gilligan Jr. in a written decision said the governor was authorized to call the peacetime emergency under the Minnesota Constitution and that arguments that the orders violated Minnesotans’ civil liberties failed to meet muster. The ruling comes months after 13 state lawmakers, Free Minnesota Small Business Coalition and a group of business owners filed the challenge alleging Walz’s dozens of directives violate Minnesotans’ civil liberties, meaning Minnesotans “cannot exercise movement and associate with others as they desire without recourse.”...
    A Ramsey County Judge on Tuesday dismissed a challenge to Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz’s executive orders aimed at combating the coronavirus, saying the governor was warranted in bringing them in the face of a global pandemic. Second Judicial Circuit Judge Thomas Gilligan Jr. in a written decision said the governor was authorized to call the peacetime emergency under the Minnesota Constitution and that arguments that the orders violated Minnesotans’ civil liberties failed to meet muster. The ruling comes months after 13 state lawmakers, Free Minnesota Small Business Coalition and a group of business owners filed the challenge alleging Walz’s dozens of directives violate Minnesotans’ civil liberties, meaning Minnesotans “cannot exercise movement and associate with others as they desire without recourse.”...
    Says the Star Tribune’s Jessie Van Berkel, “A Ramsey County judge on Tuesday dismissed a legal challenge to Gov. Tim Walz’s executive orders during the coronavirus pandemic. The lawsuit, brought by a group of businesses and 13 Republican legislators, contended the Democratic governor is abusing his power and interfering with the legislative process. Dubbed the Free Minnesota Small Business Coalition, the group asked a judge to block Walz from issuing or enforcing emergency executive orders that he has used to limit businesses’ operations, close schools and require masks in indoor public places. District Court Judge Thomas Gilligan upheld the constitutionality of the governor’s actions.” At MPR, Brian Bakst reports, “Since losing her job in March as a health clinic receptionist,...
              Citizens for Limited Government and Constitutional Integrity, Inc. doing business as Tennessee Stands filed a lawsuit in Davidson County Chancery Court Monday against Governor Bill Lee on the grounds that the state statute deeming the governor’s executive orders have the full force and effect of law is unconstitutional. Tennessee Stands founder and president Gary Humble (pictured right) along with Rodney Lunn, the plaintiffs in the case, reference Tennessee Code Annotated (T.C.A.) 58-2-107 which dates back to 2000. The law states, in part: (a) (1) The governor is responsible for addressing the dangers presented to this state and its people by emergencies. In the event of an emergency beyond local control, the governor, or,...
    Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves took a shot at the Big Ten and Pac-12 Conferences on Thursday while he announced that social gatherings around football stadiums will be prohibited. Ole Miss, Mississippi State and Southern Miss are still set to play football in the fall amid the coronavirus pandemic. Reeves said he knew his decision wouldn’t be popular, but at least there would be football. TCU'S MAX DUGGAN ADDRESSES HEART CONDITION DISCOVERED THROUGH CORONAVIRUS TEST “There will be no game-day social gatherings around stadiums: rallies, parties, tailgates. It’s no fun, but it’s what allows the athletes to play. I’d still rather be in the SEC with no tailgates, than the PAC-12 or Big 10 with no football,” Reeves wrote. As part...
              Three churches are suing the governor and his constituents for executive orders that violate their religious liberties. Defendants in the case are Governor Tim Walz, State Attorney General Keith Ellison, and county attorneys Chad Larson, Tom Kelly, and Donald Ryan. The Thomas More Society filed on behalf of the churches. The lawsuit cites Article I, Section 16 of Minnesota’s Constitution as state precedent protecting the right to worship: “the right of every man to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience shall never be infringed.” The lawsuit also cites Christian adherence to the Bible’s commandment for believers to worship together. The Thomas More Society Special Council Erick Kardaal affirmed this reasoning,...
    Some U.S.-based users of WeChat are suing President Donald Trump in a bid to block an executive order that they say would effectively bar access in the U.S. to the hugely popular Chinese messaging app. The complaint, filed Friday in San Francisco, is being brought by the nonprofit U.S. WeChat Users Alliance and several people who say they rely on the app for work, worship and staying in touch with relatives in China. The plaintiffs said they are not affiliated with WeChat, nor its parent company, Tencent Holdings. In the lawsuit, they asked a federal court judge to stop Trumps executive order from being enforced, claiming it would violate its U.S. users freedom of speech, free exercise of religion and...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Some U.S.-based users of WeChat are suing President Donald Trump in a bid to block an executive order that they say would effectively bar access in the U.S. to the hugely popular Chinese messaging app. The complaint, filed Friday in San Francisco, is being brought by the nonprofit U.S. WeChat Users Alliance and several people who say they rely on the app for work, worship and staying in touch with relatives in China. The plaintiffs said they are not affiliated with WeChat, nor its parent company, Tencent Holdings. In the lawsuit, they asked a federal court judge to stop Trump’s executive order from being enforced, claiming it would violate its U.S. users’ freedom of speech,...
              In testimony to the Joint Ad Hoc Committee to Study Emergency Powers Thursday, retired Tennessee Supreme Court Justice and president and dean of Nashville School of Law William C. Koch, Jr. said Governor Bill Lee’s executive orders are entirely consistent with the inherent power in his office and granted to him in state statute. The 17-member ad hoc committee, consisting of five senators and 12 representatives, was established by the respective speakers of each house at the request of members in light of the emergency status caused by COVID-19. The meeting started with opening remarks from Co-Chairs Rep. Jason Zachary (R-Knoxville) and Sen. Ferrell Haile (R-Gallatin). Both talked about the extraordinary times and...
    South Dakota appeared to become the first state to decline boosted federal unemployment aide that was designated under an executive order signed by President TrumpDonald John TrumpUPS, FedEx shut down calls to handle mail-in ballots, warn of 'significant' problems: report Controversial GOP Georgia candidate attempts to distance from QAnon Trump orders TikTok parent company to sell US assets within 90 days MORE this month amid the continuing pandemic. Gov. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemSouth Dakota to build 0K fence around governor's residence amid coronavirus criticism NH issues mask mandate ahead of motorcycle rally: 'Sturgis was a real clear warning' Trump denies White House asked about adding him to Mount Rushmore MORE (R), a vocal ally of the White House, said her...
    As his political support withers away along with his prospects for re-election, Donald Trump is declaring his intention to try governing as a dictator.  Trump, who bashed Obama for relying on executive orders and boasted that he’d get legislative deals done, long ago gave up on getting bills through Congress. Now, relying on advice from the lawyer who told George W. Bush that torture is legal, the president contends that he’s free to govern by issuing plainly illegal executive orders.  That helps explain why Trump—who is denying the United States Postal Service the resources required to deliver many mail-in ballots —bizarrely claimed last week that he has the ability to issue an executive order to outright bar states from accepting...
    Nine Buffalo businesses have filed a federal lawsuit against Gov. Andrew Cuomo alleging the state has overreached in its COVID-19 pandemic response and violated the plaintiffs’ constitutional rights. The complaint was filed Aug. 7 in U.S. District Court for the Western District of New York against Cuomo, the New York state Senate, Attorney General Letitia James, and the New York state Assembly. According to the suit, the plaintiffs have been financially harmed due to the governor’s executive orders that shut down nonessential businesses and the failure of the Legislature and attorney general to keep the governor’s actions in check. Bimber's Delwood, Inc. et al v. James et al was filed by attorneys Steven Cohen and Corey Hogan,...
    Savannah Rychcik August 14, 2020 0 Comments President Donald Trump said he is prepared to send another round of direct payments to Americans, but suggested on Friday Democrats are standing in the way. During his press briefing, a reporter asked Trump if Democrats gave in to some of his demands would he be willing to negotiate with them on the $25 billion for the postal service including the $3.5 billion for mail-in voting. “Sure, if they give us what we want and it’s not what I want it’s what the American people want,” Trump said. He added, “In addition to the executive orders that we signed, which are going to be doing terrific things in terms of a payroll tax...
    Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) blasted the Democrat-controlled House on Wednesday for taking a monthlong recess despite not reaching a deal with Republicans on a new COVID-19 stimulus package. What are the details? During a Facebook Live town hall with his constituents, Khanna said, "I think Congress should be in session. I think it's absurd for Congress to be going on a break during a pandemic and a national crisis." "I don't think this is a smart move to recess and I agree with you," Khanna told one constituent with questions, according to Fox News. "I share your frustration." The House last took votes on the coronavirus stimulus package on July 31. A new vote is not expected to...
    Trump and his administration have institutionalized bullshit by disconnecting actions and rhetoric from fact and truth. Their willingness to say anything so long as the results trick the gullible and advance their interests is shocking. Now, congressional inaction on further pandemic economic relief has compounded the Trump con game and opened the door to a cynical political ploy that could bury millions. Trump signed an executive order last weekend that he and his underlings portray as a lifesaver tossed to people drowning in violent economic seas. The White House pretentiously titled it Memorandum on Authorizing the Other Needs Assistance Program for Major Disaster Declarations Related to Coronavirus Disease 2019. The pandemic has become an excuse for empty posturing. The...
    Dr. Mary Trump’s recent book, Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man, has brought renewed attention to the mental health of the 45th president of the United States at a much-needed time. Much of Dr. Trump’s narrative matches the analysis of The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 37 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President, edited by DCReport contributor Bandy X. Lee, a Yale forensic psychiatrist. In this exclusive interview of Dr. Trump by a fellow mental health professional, they discussed the pathologies of Donald Trump’s originating household, his culpable homicide of thousands of Americans and the silencing of experts.  (See the video of their conversation.) This is the fifth and final installment...
    Three Minnesota churches, along with religious leaders and churchgoers, are suing the State of Minnesota and Gov. Tim Walz for his coronavirus-related executive orders requiring social distancing, masks and participant caps at religious services and ceremonies. Filed on Thursday in the U.S. District Court of Minnesota, the complaint argues that Walz’s orders requiring face masks in public buildings, as well as social distancing and limiting indoor capacity to 50 percent, violate Minnesotans’ First Amendment right to religious liberty. Minneapolis-based attorney Erick Kaardal, who is leading the case, said Thursday on a virtual news conference that Walz’s orders are “targeted at churches and houses of worship,” and that Walz “wants to prosecute” Minnesotans for their religious activities. Walz’s executive orders are...
    Most Americans say they approve of President Donald Trump’s executive orders suspending the collection of payroll taxes and enhancing state unemployment benefits. Fifty-five percent of Americans approve of the executive orders signed by Trump Saturday, according to a poll from the Economist and YouGov. That includes 26 percent of Americans who said they strongly approve of the move. Trump signed a series of executive orders at the end of last week after Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told the president that negotiations with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA.) and Senate minority leader (D-NY) over a coronavirus relief bill had gone nowhere. The orders partially restored the federal bonus to jobless benefits, providing for $400 in additional benefits instead of the $600 bonus...
    U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a joint press conference as part of a meeting with the Prime Minister of Czech Republic Andrej Babis in Prague, Czech Republic, on August 12, 2020.Petr David Josek | AFP | Getty Images U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said President Donald Trump's executive orders against TikTok and WeChat could be "broader" than just those two apps. Pompeo did not elaborate, but his comments could be hinting at action against other Chinese apps or even TikTok's parent company ByteDance, or WeChat owner Tencent. "So when President Trump made his announcement about not only TikTok, but about WeChat – and if you read it, it's broader even still than that – is that we're...
    During a Wednesday appearance on MSNBC, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi pressured Republicans to work with the Democratic Party to agree on another coronavirus relief package for Americans and warned that the pandemic is “only going to get worse,” Breitbart reported. Pelosi accused some Republican Senators of opposition to more relief package spending and claimed that Democratic lawmakers in both the House of Representatives and the Senate are “unified,” while Republican lawmakers are “disorganized” and in “disarray.” “In terms of the economy, if we do not infuse more into the economy into fighting this virus so we can open up our economy, so we can send our children to school safely and the rest, this is only going to get worse.”...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minnesota Governor Tim Walz on Wednesday signed an executive order to extend the state’s peacetime emergency through September 11. Walz says the decision was made following advice from public health experts, senior advocates, as well as labor and medical providers. “The COVID-19 pandemic continues to present an unprecedented and rapidly evolving challenge to our state. These executive orders helped us build hospital capacity, secure critical care and personal protective equipment for healthcare providers and launch an aggressive testing strategy,” said Walz. “While these actions have slowed the spread of the virus and saved lives, it is important for us to assess the continued need for existing executive orders and rescind executive orders that are no longer necessary.” The peacetime...
    Matthew Rozsa August 12, 2020 5:01PM (UTC) On Saturday President Donald Trump issued four executive orders that provided an additional $400 in weekly unemployment benefits, backdating the payments so that they can begin retroactively on August 1. Shortly after doing so, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) released a statement blasting Trump's new policies as "unworkable, weak and narrow" and adding that, in addition to reducing unemployment benefits, it "endanger seniors' Social Security and Medicare." In headlines, Trump's executive orders have largely been lumped into a few talking points: first, the $400 additional weekly unemployment benefits, $200 lower than the previous CARES Act provided. Second, that Trump's orders will threaten Medicare and Social Security. : As...
            by Liz Peek Furious that Democrat leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer were blocking a bill to help Americans through the COVID-19 crisis, President Trump stepped up and got the job done, all by himself. It Was a Beautiful Thing to Behold Over the weekend, Trump issued four executive orders that would extend modified unemployment relief to millions who are out of work, protect many from eviction from their homes, provide continued relief from student loan debt and suspend payroll taxes for employers and those earning less than $100,000. It may not be enough, but it was more than Democrats were offering. This made House Speaker Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Schumer, D-N.Y.,...
    Matthew Rozsa August 11, 2020 11:20PM (UTC) On Saturday, President Donald Trump issued four executive orders that provided an additional $400 in weekly unemployment benefits, backdating the payments so that they can begin retroactively on August 1. Shortly after doing so, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) released a statement blasting Trump's new policies as "unworkable, weak and narrow" and adding that, in addition to reducing unemployment benefits, they "endanger seniors' Social Security and Medicare." So what exactly did Trump do on Saturday? How will it affect Americans who are economically vulnerable either because of the pandemic-caused recession or because they are already elderly or poor? Salon spoke to economists and policy experts to break down...
    Both Republicans and Democrats agree that it is necessary to support these items, but Trump did not include any such assistance in his executive orders. Some politicians have said that the crisis will not be able to be overcome if the spread of the virus is not controlled. Photo: JIM WATSON / . / . In most of the negotiations that lawmakers have had in Congress, both Republicans and Democrats have agreed that more money needs to be allocated to cover the health care needs of citizens, as well as for the development of vaccines. Everyone seems to be on the understanding that it is essential that all of this be included in the next stimulus...
    Sen. Ben Sasse hit back at President Trump as they continue their dispute over the commander-in-chief’s recent executive actions — telling the president that “America doesn’t have kings.” In a note tweeted Monday afternoon from his campaign account, Sasse (R-Neb.) began the message, “Mr. President — I understand that you’re mad. A few thoughts.” He continued, “As we’ve discussed before, I don’t think Twitter is the best place to do this. But, since you moved our conversation from private to public, here we are.” Sasse then launched into the president, defending his opposition to four new executive orders signed by Trump over the weekend, after Congress was unable to reach a deal for another coronavirus relief package. “Now, on the...
    Daily Caller White House correspondent Christian Datoc sits down with Wall Street guru and CEO of Farvahar Partners Omeed Malik for a new episode of “WALL STREET MEETS WASHINGTON.” It’s the only show that breaks down the Beltway’s economic updates for both financial VIPs and everyday Americans looking for market tips. On this week’s episode, Datoc and Malik spent a whole segment dissecting President Donald Trump’s recent executive orders extending coronavirus aid to millions of Americans. (RELATED: Trump Cleans Up Congress’ Stimulus Disaster And Lights A Fire Under China | WALL STREET MEETS WASHINGTON EP. 18) Let’s review the facts: Directs Housing and Urban Development and the Department of Health and Human Services to identify Americans having trouble making their...
    The president’s decision Donald trump signing executive orders, the implementation of which remains in doubt, has put negotiations on the new comprehensive stimulus package against coronavirus in serious trouble, including the $ 1,200 check. Democrats want to meet with the president to continue negotiations, but he insists they must call him. For now there is no progress and time is short. The direct stimulus check to families, which would include $ 500 per child or dependent, is one of the few issues on which Republicans and Democrats fully agree, although they are not integrated. U.S. spouses of undocumented immigrants. According to different experts from ., The Hill and MSNBC, if the congressmen wanted the check itself, it could be...
    Ben Sasse responded to Donald Trump on Twitter Monday explaining 'none of my disagreements are personal' after the president was insulted the Republican senator called his executive orders 'unconstitutional slop.' 'Mr. President- I understand that you're mad,' Sasse wrote in a tweet from his campaign account Monday afternoon, adding 'a few thoughts' in an image of an iPhone note, which included five points. The public Twitter note insisting 'American doesn't have kings' came after Donald Trump on Monday responded to Sasse's initial statement on his unilateral orders on economic policy, claiming the Republican had gone 'rogue.' The Nebraska lawmaker insisted later in the day Monday that he wanted to keep correspondence with the president off of social media and discuss...
    Sen. Susan Collins is concerned. While her colleague from Maine, the independent Sen. Angus King, calls Donald Trump’s executive actions out for what they are—“unconstitutional executive orders [that] would accelerate the erosion of Congress’s fundamental powers and lead us further down the path to the undermining of the American experiment in self-governance,” leading the country toward an “elected monarchy“—Collins couldn’t bring herself to condemn Trump’s move, but does recognize it for what it is. Sort of. “There are constitutional limits on what the President can do to help through executive orders,” she said, even though she didn’t comment on whether Trump violated those limits. The Press Herald reports that they tried to find out, but Collins’ “spokespeople said she was not available to answer questions about...
    President Trump has Republicans rethinking the "pen and phone," a phrase his predecessor Barack Obama used to described executive power, while the media greet his latest orders with skepticism. Over the weekend, Trump issued executive orders designed to break the stalemate in Congress over the latest coronavirus economic rescue package. He seeks to use executive power to lower the payroll tax, extend unemployment benefits, and maintain a moratorium on evictions. Trump said several times last week that he would take such action if lawmakers couldn't cut a deal, adding that the White House was studying to impose these policies legally. Sen. Chuck Grassley, a senior Republican from Iowa, took to Twitter to say he "applauds" the moves. "I support President...
    President TrumpDonald John TrumpTeachers union launches 0K ad buy calling for education funding in relief bill FDA head pledges 'we will not cut corners' on coronavirus vaccine Let our values drive COVID-19 liability protection MORE and Democratic leaders both predict there will be lawsuits over this weekend’s executive orders sidestepping Congress on issues like payroll taxes and unemployment benefits, but congressional Democrats are unlikely to lead that charge. Democratic lawmakers aren’t rushing to court and will likely let state officials or private parties spearhead the legal challenges that could take months or even a year to resolve. Among their chief concerns: the optics. Democrats worry about how it will look if they’re seen as trying to block much-needed aid to...
    Monday on MSNBC’s “The ReidOut,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said President Donald Trump’s executive orders addressing the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic were an “illusion” meant to bolster the stock market and cut benefits to children who are “food insecure in our country.” Pelosi said, “What we’re seeing is illusion. It’s important to enlarge the issue to understand that what the president does is say I’m doing things to help people, which he isn’t, and then the stations pick it up and say the president is doing something to help people, and it’s all about one thing, the stock market. And the market’s picking up, the markets go up, that’s his question, what’s the market doing. The...
    The American Federation of Teachers (AFT), the second largest teachers union in the U.S., launched a $500,000 ad campaign Monday accusing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump signs executive orders after coronavirus relief talks falter Coronavirus deal key to Republicans protecting Senate majority Coronavirus talks collapse as negotiators fail to reach deal MORE (R-Ky.) of stonewalling funds to help schools to reopen safely. The six-figure buy comes as negotiations over the next coronavirus relief bill, which is expected to include funding for K-12 schools, have all but collapsed. President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump suggests some states may 'pay nothing' as part of unemployment plan Trump denies White House asked about adding him to Mount Rushmore Trump, US face pivotal UN vote on...
    President Trump’s coronavirus-related executive actions are likely constitutional, despite expressions of discontent by members of both parties, Senate Homeland Security Committee Chairman Ron Johnson, R-Wis., told "Your World" Monday. "First of all, I think the way the president and his legal team have crafted this, [it's] pretty narrow in scope and so my guess [is], they probably have the authority under disaster relief [legislation]," Johnson told host Neil Cavuto. "My guess ... is [that] his legal team has done a pretty good job of looking at exactly what legal authority he has. He’s using it to the extent that he can. But that is part of the problem," Johnson went on. " He’s constrained in terms of what he can do." On Saturday, Trump signed four executive actions aimed at providing financial relief for Americans amid the coronavirus pandemic,...
    Monday on MSNBC’s “Deadline,” network political commentator and former Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO) said President Donald Trump’s executive orders addressing the economic downturn caused by the coronavirus pandemic defunded the police and firefighters “because there’s no help for state and local governments.” McCaskill said, “Yeah, Donald Trump was going to make America great again, and what he’s succeeded in doing is making America unwelcome around the world. There’s only a handful of countries that will allow Americans to cross their borders now without any restrictions. That is an unbelievable place for the United States of America to find itself in. The president over the weekend, think about all the times we heard during the presidential campaign, Chris, about The Art of the Deal,...
    President Donald Trump made the right move by signing executive orders this weekend to allow people to continue receiving unemployment insurance benefits, former presidential adviser and campaign consultant Dick Morris told Newsmax TV. "Hes increased his bargaining leverage with the Democrats because the stuff is already done, and all theyre trying to do is tack on stuff they want, and Trump is essentially resisting it," Morris told Mondays "Spicer & Co." The deadline came and went for Democrats to pull a trigger on a deal to extend the $600 weekly unemployment benefits. This weekend, the president issued four executive orders to extend unemployment benefits of $400 a week for out of work U.S. citizens, block evictions for tenants struggling to pay mortgage...
    The White House and congressional Democrats dug in deeper in their respective tranches on Monday amid the stalemate over a new coronavirus relief package. The Senate was technically back in session on Monday, but there were no signs of a quick detente on the political and policy differences between the two sides. Two senior Democratic aides told The Hill that there have been no contacts between House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiWhite House officials, Democrats spar over legality, substance of executive orders Sunday shows - Trump coronavirus executive orders reverberate Pelosi: 'Of course there's room for compromise' on 0-per-week unemployment benefit MORE (D-Calif.), Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerWhite House officials, Democrats spar over legality, substance of executive orders Schumer declines...
    Donald Trump has a dilemma. Along with the rest of the Republican Party, he abhors the idea of enacting the kind of federal relief program that would actually help people and keep the nation’s economy from collapsing completely in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. But that kind of substantive relief means giving ordinary working people money, which goes against the core organizing principle of the GOP, which is that government exists to line the pockets of the rich at the expense of everyone else. However, Republicans and Trump realize that their economic attitudes are wildly unpopular with most Americans, who do not see the pandemic as an exciting opportunity to experiment with how many millions of people can be evicted or foreclosed out...
    President Trump utilized the "Barack Obama method" by extending federal unemployment benefits and instituting a payroll tax holiday through a series of executive orders, "one of which stretches the law in a way that a future progressive President will surely cite as a precedent,"  the Wall Street Journal editorial board lamented Monday. The paper did credit the president for defying what it called the "multi-trillion-dollar blackmail" of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and her "wingman," Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. WHAT'S IN PRESIDENT TRUMP'S FOUR CORONAVIRUS RELIEF EXECUTIVE ORDERS? VideoPelosi, the board wrote, essentially offered Trump and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin "terms of surrender" that included a renewal of the $600-per-week federal unemployment benefit amid a handful of mostly unrelated actions prioritized...
    There was hardly a soul at the US Capitol on Monday, reflecting the lack of optimism for a new coronavirus relief deal amid the mounting blame-game between Democratic and Republican lawmakers. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Monday dismissed President Trump’s sweeping executive orders on coronavirus pandemic relief as “all sizzle, no steak.” The New York Democrat said Trump’s four pandemic relief orders — signed Saturday after Capitol Hill gridlock — are insufficient and hard to implement after a breakdown in talks on legislation. “President Trump’s executive orders are hardly worth the paper they’re printed on,” Schumer said on the Senate floor. “Executive orders in general aren’t going to get the job done, especially the incompetent ones issued over the...
    There was hardly a soul at the US Capitol on Monday, reflecting the lack of optimism for a new coronavirus relief deal amid the mounting blame-game between Democratic and Republican lawmakers. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Monday dismissed President Trump’s sweeping executive orders on coronavirus pandemic relief as “all sizzle, no steak.” The New York Democrat said Trump’s four pandemic relief orders — signed Saturday after Capitol Hill gridlock — are insufficient and hard to implement after a breakdown in talks on legislation. “President Trump’s executive orders are hardly worth the paper they’re printed on,” Schumer said on the Senate floor. “Executive orders in general aren’t going to get the job done, especially the incompetent ones issued over the...
    Bradley Cortright August 10, 2020 0 Comments Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) is responding to President Donald Trump’s recent Twitter attack over his criticism of the president’s new executive orders aimed at providing financial relief to Americans. Trump took aim at Sasse on Monday morning for calling his executive orders “unconstitutional slop,” as IJR reported. Later in the day, Sasse’s to the president’s attack on Twitter, “Mr. President — I understand that you’re mad. A few thoughts….” He continued, “As we’ve discussed before, I don’t think Twitter is the best place to do this. But, since you moved our conversation from private to public, here we are…” Sasse said he believes Trump is not happy he did not join his re-election committee and that he...
    Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., told Newsmax TV on Monday that President Donald Trumps use of executive orders to provide coronavirus relief "goes against, not only the spirit, but the letter of the law." Trump on Saturday issued executive orders bypassing Congress, which had failed to reach an agreement on additional coronavirus relief. Trumps orders include extending the supplemental federal unemployment benefits, deferral of payroll tax, and other measures. Paul told "American Agenda" on Monday afternoon that "Presidents dont get to legislate, presidents dont have the power of the purse," and noted former President Barack Obama was frequently criticized for "his spending and borrowing, and his executive orders on immigration." The senator added he is "not a fan" of Trumps actions,...
    Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseWhite House officials, Democrats spar over legality, substance of executive orders Kudlow acknowledges executive orders may end up in court: 'We're going to go ahead with our actions anyways' Several GOP lawmakers express concern over Trump executive orders MORE (R-Neb.) on Monday defended his opposition to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump suggests some states may 'pay nothing' as part of unemployment plan Trump denies White House asked about adding him to Mount Rushmore Trump, US face pivotal UN vote on Iran MORE's use of executive orders to address the coronavirus pandemic, hours after the president publicly called the GOP senator out over his criticism. Sasse — in a note tweeted from his campaign account and signed...
    Monday on MSNBC, Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) said President Donald Trump’s executive orders addressing the economic downturn caused by the coronavirus pandemic were a bad “public relations stunt.” Host Steve Kornacki said, “I know you don’t think the president should have taken these actions over the weekend. I know you don’t like the approach that he’s put in them. But practically speaking, do you believe the things that he has done or says he has done through these executive actions. Do you believe they are going to be implemented?” Jayapal said, “I don’t know if they’re going to be implemented, but even if they are, these were a PR stunt, nothing more than a public relations stunt and a bad one at...
    U.S. COVID-19 deaths drop for first time in four weeks Life with coronavirus: How businesses are turning to tech to cope with COVID-19 Heres what happened to the stock market on Monday © Provided by CNBC The Dow Jones Industrial Average rises 357 points The Dow climbed 357 points, or 1.3%, to close at 27,791.44. The S&P 500 gained 0.3% to end the day at 3360.47, about 1% from an all-time high. The Nasdaq Composite dipped 0.4% to 10,968.36. Stocks tried to build on last week's momentum even as lawmakers struggle to make inroads on a new coronavirus deal. Load Error Trump signs executive orders on coronavirus reliefOver the weekend, President Donald Trump signed executive orders that continue the distribution...
    In fact, Obama signed far fewer executive orders than Trump has. Three-and-a-half years into his first term, Trump has signed 177 executive orders, more than the 109 Obama signed in his first four full years as president, according to data from the Federal Register. Here are 10 times Trump said governing by executive order was the sign of a poor leader who is unable to make deals. July 10, 2012 "Why is @BarackObama constantly issuing executive orders that are major power grabs of authority? This is the latest," Trump tweeted. The link Trump tweeted is no longer live. However, four days before that tweet, Obama signed an executive order titled "Assignment of National Security and Emergency Preparedness Communications Functions," aimed...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS SF) — Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday responded to President Trump’s weekend executive orders on unemployment, saying that the federal plan falls far short of what California needs in terms of funding help for the state’s millions of unemployed residents. “We analyzed the federal proposal that the President has put together and analyzed what the associated costs and expected benefits of advancing the program would be,” Newsom said early in his Monday address. Newsom explained that Trump’s new executive orders on unemployment relies on relief money already sent and mostly spent by California, falling far short of the state’s needs. The executive orders issued over the weekend came after the Trump administration and Democrats failed to come to...
    Republicans in Congress are furious that Democrats left town after failing to reach a deal with them on a phase 4 coronavirus stimulus package. President Donald Trump signed four executive orders Saturday in order to help the unemployed and the economy, effectively bypassing congress to send money to Americans. Democrats had already left town, and didn’t hesitate to criticize the president’s executive orders. This comes after House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer announced in late July that the House would remain in session until a deal on a stimulus package is reached, but that did not happen. There are now no House votes until Sept. 14, and members will have 24 hours notice to return for any votes related to coronavirus....
    Getty President Donald Trump departs the White House for a trip to Ohio where he will visit a Whirlpool factory on August 6, 2020 in Washington, DC. On Saturday, President Donald Trump signed four executive orders in an attempt to provide economic relief to Americans struggling in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. Noticeably missing from his actions was funding for a second round of stimulus checks. Why? According to CNBC, funding for federal programs must be authorized by Congress. Kris Coz, a senior tax policy analyst for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, told the outlet, “The constitution mandates that only Congress has the power of the purse — the president cannot unilaterally tax and spend.”...
    President Donald Trump took a swipe at Republican Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse on Monday, calling him a “RINO” after Sasse criticized the president’s use of executive orders. Trump signed four executive orders Saturday — including a payroll-tax deferral — which Sasse called an “unconstitutional” move. (RELATED: Biden Criticized Trump’s Order Cutting Payroll Tax. During The Recession, Obama Said It Would Be ‘Inexcusable’ To Block A Similar Tax Cut) “The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop. President Obama did not have the power to unilaterally rewrite immigration law with DACA, and President Trump does not have the power to unilaterally rewrite the payroll tax law. Under the Constitution, that power belongs to the American people acting through their members...
    Donald Trump bashed Ben Sasse on Monday as a 'rogue' Republican after the Nebraska senator called the president's flurry of executive orders 'unconstitutional slop.' 'RINO Ben Sasse, who needed my support and endorsement in order to get the Republican nomination for Senate from the GREAT State of Nebraska, has, now that he's got it (Thank you President T), gone rogue, again,' Trump charged of Sasse in a tweet Monday morning. 'This foolishness plays right into the hands of the Radical Left Dems!' the president continued. Sasse spoke out against the president signing four executive orders on Saturday to provide relief in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic after negotiations on Capitol Hill collapsed last week. 'Then pen-and-phone theory of executive...
    Amanda Marcotte August 10, 2020 5:00PM (UTC) Donald Trump has a dilemma. Along with the rest of the Republican Party, he abhors the idea of enacting the kind of federal relief program that would actually help people and keep the nation's economy from collapsing completely in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. But that kind of substantive relief means giving ordinary working people money, which goes against the core organizing principle of the GOP, which is that government exists to line the pockets of the rich at the expense of everyone else. However, Republicans and Trump realize that their economic attitudes are wildly unpopular with most Americans, who do not see the pandemic as an exciting opportunity to experiment with how many millions...
    President Trump on Monday slammed Republican Sen. Ben Sasse for calling Trump’s new executive orders “unconstitutional slop.” “RINO Ben Sasse, who needed my support and endorsement in order to get the Republican nomination for Senate from the GREAT State of Nebraska, has, now that he’s got it (Thank you President T), gone rogue, again,” Trump tweeted. “This foolishness plays right into the hands of the Radical Left Dems!” Trump on Saturday signed four executive orders after Congress gridlocked in coronavirus relief talks. The orders revive a federal evictions moratorium, extend student loan deferment, create a $400 weekly unemployment supplement and suspend payroll taxes on incomes under $104,000. Sasse (R-Neb.), who won the Republican nomination in May to serve a...
    President Trump on Monday slammed Republican Sen. Ben Sasse for calling Trump’s new executive orders “unconstitutional slop.” “RINO Ben Sasse, who needed my support and endorsement in order to get the Republican nomination for Senate from the GREAT State of Nebraska, has, now that he’s got it (Thank you President T), gone rogue, again,” Trump tweeted. “This foolishness plays right into the hands of the Radical Left Dems!” Trump on Saturday signed four executive orders after Congress gridlocked in coronavirus relief talks. The orders revive a federal evictions moratorium, extend student loan deferment, create a $400 weekly unemployment supplement and suspend payroll taxes on incomes under $104,000. Sasse (R-Neb.), who won the Republican nomination in May to serve a second...
    Madison Summers August 10, 2020 0 Comments Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) is taking heat from the president after criticizing President Donald Trump’s executive orders regarding coronavirus relief. “RINO Ben Sasse, who needed my support and endorsement in order to get the Republican nomination for Senate from the GREAT State of Nebraska, has, now that he’s got it, (Thank you President T), gone rogue, again,” Trump tweeted on Monday. “This foolishness plays right into the hands of the Radical Left Dems!” he added. RINO Ben Sasse, who needed my support and endorsement in order to get the Republican nomination for Senate from the GREAT State of Nebraska, has, now that he’s got it (Thank you President T), gone rogue,...
    IN THE WHITE HOUSE Donald Trump pulled out his magic, presidential wand:     Over the weekend, President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump suggests some states may 'pay nothing' as part of unemployment plan Trump denies White House asked about adding him to Mount Rushmore Trump, US face pivotal UN vote on Iran MORE signed executive orders to help with coronavirus relief as the negotiations on Capitol Hill are stalled. https://bit.ly/3iw6gvV  The executive orders:  Extends the expired unemployment benefit but lowers the additional payout from $600 a week to $400. “Directs the Treasury Department to allow employers to defer payment of employee-side Social Security payroll taxes through the end of 2020 for Americans earning less than about $100,000 annually.” Defer student loan payments...
    On Monday, President Donald Trump went on the attack against Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE) for condemning the coronavirus relief executive orders he signed after negotiations failed in Congress. “RINO Ben Sasse, who needed my support and endorsement in order to get the Republican nomination for Senate from the GREAT State of Nebraska, has, now that he’s got it (Thank you President T), gone rogue, again,” Trump fumed on Twitter. “This foolishness plays right into the hands of the Radical Left Dems!” RINO Ben Sasse, who needed my support and endorsement in order to get the Republican nomination for Senate from the GREAT State of Nebraska, has, now that he’s got it (Thank you President T), gone rogue, again. This...
    Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinWhite House officials, Democrats spar over legality, substance of executive orders Sunday shows - Trump coronavirus executive orders reverberate Pelosi: 'Of course there's room for compromise' on 0-per-week unemployment benefit MORE on Monday defended President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump suggests some states may 'pay nothing' as part of unemployment plan Trump denies White House asked about adding him to Mount Rushmore Trump, US face pivotal UN vote on Iran MORE's decision to sign a series of orders over the weekend in an effort to provide financial relief to Americans amid the coronavirus pandemic, arguing that the president had to move forward while discussions with Democrats over legislation have been making little progress. “If we can get...
    The Wall Street Journal's editorial board criticized President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump suggests some states may 'pay nothing' as part of unemployment plan Trump denies White House asked about adding him to Mount Rushmore Trump, US face pivotal UN vote on Iran MORE for signing executive orders Saturday to extend unemployment benefits and other coronavirus relief measures, likening his actions to those taken by former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaWhy payroll tax cut opponents may want to reconsider Michelle Obama, Sanders, Kasich to be featured on first night of Democratic convention: report Graham says he appreciates Trump orders, but 'would much prefer a congressional agreement' MORE.  In an editorial published late Sunday, the board wrote Trump was “right to walk away rather than...
    But the order Trump signed merely tells two federal agencies to "consider" whether halting evictions are "reasonably necessary to prevent the further spread of COVID-19." That is not an eviction moratorium, as Trump claimed. Trump also said, "Democrats don't want to do anything having to do with protecting people from eviction." However, Democrats passed an eviction moratorium on May 15 as part of a major coronavirus relief bill that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell refused to debate, let alone put up for a vote. Trump also ordered a deferment of the payroll tax — an important tax that funds Social Security and Medicare. Under Trump's order, Americans will still owe the payroll taxes that would have come out of their paychecks...
    Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerWhite House officials, Democrats spar over legality, substance of executive orders Schumer declines to say whether Trump executive orders are legal: They don't 'do the job' Schumer: Idea that 0 unemployment benefit keeps workers away from jobs 'belittles the American people' MORE (D-N.Y.) on Monday denied that top Democrats had reached out to the White House to restart negotiations on coronavirus aid despite claims from President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump suggests some states may 'pay nothing' as part of unemployment plan Trump denies White House asked about adding him to Mount Rushmore Trump, US face pivotal UN vote on Iran MORE that they had. "Fables from Donald Trump. Fables. That's what he seems to specialize in. I...
    HILLARY Clinton has slammed President Trump's decision to bypass Congress with executive orders, calling it a "stunt" and a "diversion". Trump last week signed four executive orders to defer payroll taxes and replace the $600-a-week unemployment benefit with a $400 weekly payment, after Congress failed to agree on a new stimulus package. 3Hillary Clinton slammed Trump's decision to bypass Congress 3Clinton said Trump's actions were a 'stunt' and a 'diversion'Credit: AFP or licensors “It's a stunt,” Clinton, who ran against Trump in the 2016 presidential election, said Sunday on MSNBC's AM Joy. "There's no doubt about it, it's most likely, as even Republican senators have said, unconstitutional, bypassing the Congress, trying to spend money that he has no authority to direct."...
    The public does not trust the mainstream media because of journalists pushing their opinions over facts, The Hill's media reporter Joe Concha told "Fox & Friends" Monday. Concha cited a "disturbing" poll released last week, a study from Gallup and the Knight Foundation, showing 86 percent of Americans believe media outlets lean one way or another politically and a majority of Americans, 56 percent, say their go-to news source has some form of "bias." LIZ PEEK: TRUMP'S BIG WIN ON RELIEF ORDERS – HERE'S WHY PELOSI, SCHUMER ARE SO UNHAPPY As one example of media bias, Washington Post reporter Colby Itkowitz tweeted about President Trump's Friday executive order asking the question, "can you imagine if Obama had broken up a congressional stalemate over funding by simply signing an executive...
    For those of you who were literally just born, let us explain a bit of history from the before-times of the Barack Obama presidency. During those years, Republicans, conservatives, and racists—but I repeat myself—were all absolutely certain that President Barack Obama’s executive orders on take-your-pick were “tyranny.” They were “menacing” evidence of an emerging dictatorship, and an affront to the Framers, and evidence of the “corruptibility of power,” and that’s just from a single Fox News freak-out. Now it is One White President later and conservatives would like you to know that Actually, presidential executive orders come from Jesus. WATCH: Peter Navarro says “the Lord and Founding Fathers created executive orders because of partisan bickering and divided government.” #MTP #IfItsSunday pic.twitter.com/2cwgun9yFd ...
    Getty A new coronavirus stimulus package is expected to be released this week. Will fewer people be eligible for a check? President Donald Trump signed four executive orders over the weekend to give Americans’ various forms of stimulus relief due to the pandemic. However, a second round of COVID-19 stimulus checks was not among them, probably because funding authority is the domain of Congress, not presidential powers. It’s still possible Americans could get another stimulus check. However, it appears it will take Congress coming back to the table to complete the deal that broke down last week and now President Trump’s executive order pen. Will that happen? Will Republicans and Democrats continue negotiating? If they do reach a...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn’t telling the full story when it comes to executive orders on coronavirus relief payments and health care. Over the weekend, the president suggested that his move to bypass Congress with executive action calling for up to $400 in weekly unemployment assistance would mean immediate cash in hand for laid-off Americans during the pandemic. There’s no guarantee of that. His own economic adviser acknowledged Sunday that various details remained to be worked out, including contributions from the states, and that legal challenges appeared likely. And on health care, Trump said he would pursue a “major” executive order to require health insurance companies to cover preexisting conditions, something that “has never been done before.” Actually,...
    By HOPE YEN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't telling the full story when it comes to executive orders on coronavirus relief payments and health care. Over the weekend, the president suggested that his move to bypass Congress with executive action calling for up to $400 in weekly unemployment assistance would mean immediate cash in hand for laid-off Americans during the pandemic. There's no guarantee of that. His own economic adviser acknowledged Sunday that various details remained to be worked out, including contributions from the states, and that legal challenges appeared likely. And on health care, Trump said he would pursue a “major” executive order to require health insurance companies to cover preexisting conditions, something that “has...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn’t telling the full story when it comes to executive orders on coronavirus relief payments and health care. Over the weekend, the president suggested that his move to bypass Congress with executive action calling for up to $400 in weekly unemployment assistance would mean immediate cash in hand for laid-off Americans during the pandemic. There’s no guarantee of that. His own economic adviser acknowledged Sunday that various details remained to be worked out, including contributions from the states, and that legal challenges appeared likely. And on health care, Trump said he would pursue a “major” executive order to require health insurance companies to cover preexisting conditions, something that “has never been done before.” Actually,...
    President Donald Trump on Sunday indicated he was open to restarting negotiations with the Democrats after his advisers spent the day defending the questions that surrounded his executive orders designed to bring coronavirus relief.  'I've been involved personally through my representatives,' he told DailyMail.com about his role in the talks with congressional Democrats.  But he said it ‘works better’ than the negotiations were being done by Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin as opposed to him taking a more direct role. ‘I think it actually works better if we do the way we're doing. We've got much of what we wanted, without having to give up anything,’ he said in response to a question from DailyMail.com....
    Sunday, CNN played audio of a phone call in which Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-NY) said President Donald Trump’s executive orders addressing the economic downturn caused by the coronavirus pandemic were “laughable.” Host Dana Bash said, “The New York governor is slamming the president’s executive actions calling them laughable. In a call, today, updating the state’s battle with the pandemic, the Democratic governor of New York Andrew Cuomo questioned the legality of the president’s moves criticizing the directives to force states to pay for more unemployment and not providing any funding for schools to reopen.” Cuomo said, “The concept of saying to states, you pay 25% of the unemployment insurance is just laughable. The whole issue here was getting states funding,...
    Savannah Rychcik August 9, 2020 0 Comments According to Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, President Donald Trump’s executive actions are no more than a distraction from ongoing negotiations in Congress over the next coronavirus relief package. Appearing on MSNBC’s “AM Joy,” Clinton challenged Trump’s executive orders. “It’s a stunt. There’s no doubt about it. It’s most likely, as even Republican senators have said, unconstitutional, bypassing the Congress, trying to spend money that he has no authority to direct,” Clinton said. She added. “But it’s also meant to be a big diversion from the hard work the Congress should be engaged in to provide the kind of relief that tens of millions of Americans need.”Watch her comments below: Sec. @HillaryClinton: #Trump...
    Sunday on MSNBC, Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) said President Donald Trump’s executive orders addressing the economic downturn caused by the coronavirus pandemic were “extraordinarily misleading.” Waters said, “The president’s executive orders are questionable. First of all, it’s questionable whether or not he could do what he’s attempting to go constitutionality. But in addition to that, they’re extraordinarily misleading. I am so focused on rental assistance.” Water added, “The eviction moratorium is over. This president is playing politics with this issue.” Follow Pam Key on Twitter @pamkeyNEN
    On Saturday Donald Trump announced, in a bizarre golf clubhouse speech to an audience of millionaires, a series of "executive orders" that he will (attempt to) undertake as substitute for negotiating new pandemic aid packages with Congress. Those talks had stalled due to Republican Senate indifference as to passing anything, Trump team unwillingness to assist state governments in economic crisis due to the pandemic, and Democratic insistence that Trump's new postmaster general stop actively sabotaging the U.S. mail system during that pandemic. Because Trump has surrounded himself with conservatism's least competent blowhards—namely, whichever self-promoting grifters impress him during Fox News appearances—the executive orders produced manage to both do extremely bad things, and to do them illegally. The Trump team is...