2020-09-30@15:33:55 GMT
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    Senate Republicans have threatened to confirm more judges to the federal bench if Democrats try to delay the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Democrats cannot stop Barrett's nomination without a Senate majority, but senators have readied tactics to disrupt and obstruct the process for as long as they can using a wide range of procedural tools.  That could include invoking the so-called "two-hour rule" -- a move that halts all committee business after the Senate has been in session for longer than two hours -- along with delaying a final committee vote by one week, denying a quorum or even impeaching the president, among other tactics. GINSBURG DEATH CASTS FRESH UNCERTAINTY ON THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT'S FUTURE “Let me...
    Judge Amy Coney Barrett breezed through a first day of meetings with Republican senators, winning both abundant praise and promises that she’ll be confirmed to the Supreme Court as soon as the end of next month. "You just knock it out of the park as a law professor, as a lawyer, and I think you're just an outstanding judge, ready for a good promotion," Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican and chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said while meeting with Barrett in the Capitol. No Democrat met with Barrett. Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, said he strongly opposes her nomination and believes the confirmation is taking place too close to an election. He also believes Barrett...
    It's been 136 days since the House passed the $3 trillion HEROES Act, which Sen. Mitch McConnell has refused to take up, and in two days the government runs out of funding with the end of the fiscal year. The election is in 34 days. The Senate plans to take enough time away from plotting their next act of larceny with the Supreme Court in order to pass the continuing resolution (CR) to fund the government until Dec. 11. The House sent it over last week by end of day Wednesday, hours before the deadline. Which leaves the coronavirus stimulus. The House revealed their new $2.2 trillion baseline proposal Monday evening with the goal of passing it Wednesday—assuming that it doesn't trigger real movement...
    Sen. Mitch McConnell enjoys power. He enjoys money and power, and those seem to be the only motivating factors in his life. He does not care that he’s a hypocrite. He does not care that people can see that he is a hypocrite. McConnell’s entire existence is an exercise in cynicism. McConnell’s Kentucky Senate seat will be decided this November. Running against him is Marine veteran Amy McGrath. Being the incumbent who is hell-bent on stacking the Supreme Court with ultra-conservative Inquisition types, McConnell has been leery of debating McGrath in public because … well, he’s got a lot to lose. The Herald-Leader reports that any chance of getting McConnell to engage in a debate with his Democratic challenger seems to be contingent on one very...
    Loading the player... Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is not married to Sen. Mitch McConnell’s relative despite a persistent internet rumor. Cameron has been at the center of controversy since he was appointed to the investigation into Breonna Taylor’s death after Louisville police officers executed a botched no-knock raid. The backlash against him reached new heights last week after a grand jury decided not to directly charge any of the officers involved in Taylor’s death.   Read More: Activist Tamika Mallory slams Daniel Cameron: ‘You are a coward, you are a sellout’ Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron speaks at last week’s press conference to announce a grand jury’s decision to indict one of three Louisville Metro Police Department officers...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Tuesday accused Democrats of making “hysterical claims” about Judge Amy Coney Barrett, whom President Trump nominated to the Supreme Court on Saturday. “One of the pre-selected scare tactics is that Judge Barrett is out to steal Americans’ healthcare coverage,” the Kentucky Republican said on the Senate floor. “That’s the claim. This mother of seven, including multiple children who were born or adopted facing pre-existing condition medical challenges, is just itching to block families like hers from accessing medical care. What a joke. What a joke.” Senate Democrats are poised to oppose Barrett unanimously, based in part on their view that she will vote to overturn Obamacare in a case that the Supreme Court will consider...
    Washington — Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, is set to meet with several Republican senators on Tuesday ahead of her confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Nominees traditionally meet with senators ahead of the hearings, although some Democrats have said they will not meet with Barrett because they view the confirmation process as illegitimate. Barrett will be stationed in a room in the U.S. Capitol for the day, where she will be visited by Republican senators. She's meeting first with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Vice President Mike Pence. She will then meet with several of the GOP members of the Judiciary Committee, including Senators Mike Crapo, Chuck Grassley, Ted Cruz and...
    Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett on Tuesday began meeting with senators who are expected to vote soon on her confirmation. Barrett kicked off the traditional charm offensive with a three-minute press gaggle with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Vice President Mike Pence. “We’re pleased today to welcome Judge Barrett to begin the process of advise and consent in the Senate. And if you know she’ll be visiting with members who are interested in talking to her during the course of the next few days,” McConnell said. “We’re glad to have her here and glad to get the process started.” Barrett, 48, was nominated on Saturday by President Trump and the trip is one of the first steps in...
    President Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court arrived on Capitol Hill on Tuesday morning, appearing alongside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Vice President Mike Pence. Judge Amy Coney Barrett will visit with several Republican senators on Tuesday, including Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham. Graham, a South Carolina Republican, plans to begin Barrett’s confirmation hearing on Oct. 12 and said the panel will vote to advance her nomination to the floor on Oct. 22. McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, told reporters in the Capitol that senators “are glad to have her here and glad to get the process started.” Democrats oppose moving forward with Barrett’s nomination, arguing it should wait until the next president is sworn in next year....
    Judge Amy Coney Barrett remained completely silent on Tuesday when presented with the question of should she recuse herself from matters related to the 2020 election if confirmed to the Supreme Court. Coney was accompanied by Vice President Mike Pence, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, and White House Counsel Pat Cipollone as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell welcomed her to Capitol Hill. McConnell and Pence spoke to reporters during their meeting and called for the start of the confirmation process for Barrett to take the seat left behind by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. After Pence finished speaking, a reporter asked McConnell “if Judge Barrett is confirmed, should she recuse herself from any election-related cases?” McConnell...
    President TrumpDonald John TrumpCensus Bureau intends to wrap up count on Oct. 5 despite judge's order Top House Republican calls for probe of source of NYT Trump tax documents New Yorkers report receiving ballots with wrong name, voter addresses MORE's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett has a packed schedule on Capitol Hill Tuesday, when she will meet with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump, GOP aim to complete reshaping of federal judiciary Supreme Court fight should drive Democrats and help Biden Harris on SCOTUS fight: Ginsburg's legacy 'at stake' MORE (R-Ky.) and seven other key Senate Republicans in back-to-back sessions. Barrett’s first meeting will be with McConnell at 10 a.m. and there will be a stakeout afterward...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will meet Tuesday with Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett ahead of her plans to make the rounds in the Capitol. McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, plans to hold a press conference at 10 a.m. before meeting with Barrett, whom President Trump nominated to the high court on Saturday. McConnell praised Barrett on Saturday as "an exceptionally impressive jurist and an exceedingly well-qualified nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States." In addition to McConnell, Barrett will meet with Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, an Iowa Republican and a senior member of the Judiciary panel. So far, no Democrats have announced plans to meet with Barrett,...
    Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden again avoided a question about whether he backs growing calls from his party to expand the Supreme Court following President Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett on Sunday. During a speech in Delaware, the former vice president told reporters that he did not want to discuss whether or not he backed adding more justices to the high court if he won the Nov. 3 election. "We should see to it that the American public will vote in the Senate races in this election and they'll vote Republicans out of office. That's the consequence," he said. GINSBURG DEATH CASTS FRESH UNCERTAINTY ON THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT'S FUTURE Biden has long opposed the issue of court-packing, but Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death has revived the concept of...
    Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg fought tirelessly for gender equality and civil rights. As the second woman to ever be appointed to the Supreme Court, she authored a multitude of important decisions that have impacted the lives of so many individuals, such as striking down Virginia Military Institute’s male-only admission policy and fighting for individuals with mental disabilities’ right to community-based housing. Former President Bill Clinton, who appointed Ginsburg 27 years ago, described her as “a brilliant lawyer with a caring heart, common sense, fierce devotion to fairness and equality, and boundless courage in the face of her own adversity.”   Source: CBS Los Angeles/Youtube Before she passed away on September 18th, at 87 years old, Justice Ginsberg...
    Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) said on Sunday’s broadcast of ABC’s “This Week” that Democrats were willing to end the filibuster if they take the Senate majority in November’s election. Anchor George Stephanopoulos asked, “If Democrats are successful in November, and you increase your numbers in the Senate, your colleague Ed Markey has suggested if Republicans confirm Judge Barrett, end the filibuster and expand the Supreme Court, is that on the table?” Durbin said, “Well, can tell you the future about the Senate rules is on the table and I’m part of it. The reason is this, we have seen under Mitch McConnell the destruction, denigration of the United States Senate. George, last year in the Senate, 2019, we had 22...
    A gun control group on Saturday protested Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's support for the Supreme Court nomination of Amy Coney Barrett with a mural declaring "We Call BS" outside his Washington, D.C. home. WHERE HAS AMY CONEY BARRETT STOOD ON IMPORTANT CASES? "Hey Mitch. We Call BS. Let The People Decide," the mural reads. March For Our Lives co-founder David Hogg posted a selfie with the mural on Twitter. Hogg called on McConnell to "honor RBG’s wish, let the American people decide." March For Our Lives was founded by gun violence survivors in 2018 after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School mass shooting in Parkland, Fla., that left 17 dead. McConnell has faced criticism for supporting President Trump's decision to nominate a...
    Judge Amy Coney Barrett will start making the rounds on Capitol Hill next week as Republicans ramp up work on her Supreme Court nomination weeks before the election. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocratic senator to party: 'A little message discipline wouldn't kill us' House to vote on resolution affirming peaceful transition of power Republican lawyers brush off Trump's election comments MORE (R-Ky.) said in a statement that he will meet with Barrett once the chamber returns to Washington next week.  “I look forward to meeting with the nominee next week and will carefully study her record and credentials. As I have stated, this nomination will receive a vote on the Senate floor in the weeks ahead, following the work...
    Republicans in Congress lauded President Trump for his nomination of 7th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Saturday night while Democrats slammed the president and the nominee, predicting that her confirmation could be a death knell for a number of liberal priorities, including the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Roe v. Wade. Barrett is up to fill the Supreme Court seat of late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who was a trailblazer for women's rights and the face of the liberal bloc of the court. Barrett's confirmation would significantly tip the ideological balance of the tribunal in favor of conservatives. "I stand before you to fulfill one of my highest and most important duties,"...
    Washington (CNN)Top Senate Republicans on Saturday applauded President Donald Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to become the next Supreme Court justice and called for a quick confirmation vote.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called Barrett "exceedingly well-qualified" and an "exceptionally impressive jurist" in a statement and reiterated his vow for the Senate to hold a vote on the nomination, saying it will take place "in the weeks ahead."The likely confirmation hearing schedule in the Judiciary Committee is already being circulated to members of the Senate, according to three people familiar with the process, and would tee up a Senate floor vote shortly before Election Day. The hearing would begin October 12, with questioning on the next two days, and a...
    Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) vowed on Friday to do everything in his power to prevent the confirmation of President Donald Trump’s U.S. Supreme Court nominee. The Massachusetts lawmaker wrote from his official Twitter account Friday that he would do everything in his power “to stop Judge Amy Coney Barrett from being confirmed to the Supreme Court,” referencing the circuit court judge Barrett, whom Trump is widely anticipated to select as his nominee Saturday evening. Markey reiterated similar sentiments from his Senate campaign Twitter account Saturday afternoon: Mitch McConnell and the Republicans are trying to steal yet another Supreme Court seat, even after voting has already begun. We won’t let them. I will do everything in my power to block this...
    Senate Majority Mitch McConnell lauded both President Trump and his Supreme Court pick Judge Amy Coney Barrett after her unveiling in a White House Rose Garden ceremony. "President Trump could not have made a better decision. Judge Amy Coney Barrett is an exceptionally impressive jurist and an exceedingly well-qualified nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States," McConnell wrote in a statement. McConnell, who hasn't wavered in his push for the Senate to consider a Trump appointee to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, hinted at the political fight about to take place in the Senate before the Nov. 3 general elections. The Kentucky Republican insisted his chamber should evaluate Coney Barrett's candidacy based on her...
    President Trump has named Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his choice to replace late Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court — a long-sought victory for conservatives and the anti-abortion movement. “I stand  before you today to fulfill one of my highest and most important duties under the United States Constitution,” Trump said. “It is my honor to nominate one of our nation’s most brilliant and gifted legal minds to the Supreme Court … Judge Amy Coney Barrett.” Barrett’s nomination seals one of the most ambitious promises of Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign: the conservative transformation of the federal judiciary. If she is confirmed, the court would lean to the right, six justices to three, for years to come....
    WASHINGTON -- The Republican-led Senate is expected to move quickly toward a confirmation vote for President Donald Trump's nominee to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg once he announces his choice on Saturday.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell hasn't yet said for certain whether a final vote will come before or after the Nov. 3 presidential election, just a little more than five weeks away, but Republicans are eyeing a vote in late October.Ginsburg's Sept. 18 death put the Senate in uncharted political terrain. A confirmation vote so close to a presidential election would be unprecedented, creating significant political risk and uncertainty for both parties. Early voting is underway in some states in the races for the White...
    Youth March For Our Lives activists on Saturday chalked a mural outside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocratic senator to party: 'A little message discipline wouldn't kill us' House to vote on resolution affirming peaceful transition of power Republican lawyers brush off Trump's election comments MORE's (R-Ky.) Washington, D.C. home calling for a Supreme Court selection after Election Day. Activists wrote: "Hey Mitch. We Call BS. Let The People Decide." The gun violence prevention advocates' art was in opposition to filling the vacant Supreme Court seat left by the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgProgressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick Democratic senator to party: 'A little message discipline wouldn't kill us' Lincoln...
    By MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-led Senate is expected to move quickly toward a confirmation vote for President Donald Trump's nominee to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg once he announces his choice on Saturday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell hasn’t yet said for certain whether a final vote will come before or after the Nov. 3 presidential election, just a little more than five weeks away, but Republicans are eyeing a vote in late October. Ginsburg’s Sept. 18 death put the Senate in uncharted political terrain. A confirmation vote so close to a presidential election would be unprecedented, creating significant political risk and uncertainty for both parties. Early voting is underway...
    WASHINGTON – The Republican-led Senate is expected to move quickly toward a confirmation vote for President Donald Trump's nominee to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg once he announces his choice on Saturday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell hasn’t yet said for certain whether a final vote will come before or after the Nov. 3 presidential election, just a little more than five weeks away, but Republicans are eyeing a vote in late October. Ginsburg’s Sept. 18 death put the Senate in uncharted political terrain. A confirmation vote so close to a presidential election would be unprecedented, creating significant political risk and uncertainty for both parties. Early voting is underway in some states in the races...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-led Senate is expected to move quickly toward a confirmation vote for President Donald Trump’s nominee to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg once he announces his choice on Saturday. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell hasn’t yet said for certain whether a final vote will come before or after the Nov. 3 presidential election, just a little more than five weeks away, but Republicans are eyeing a vote in late October. Ginsburg’s Sept. 18 death put the Senate in uncharted political terrain. A confirmation vote so close to a presidential election would be unprecedented, creating significant political risk and uncertainty for both parties. Early voting is underway in some states in the...
    The new Supreme Court battle officially starts today. President Trump is expected to announce his pick to fill the Supreme Court vacated by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg this afternoon, and multiple sources tell Fox News that Amy Coney Barrett will be his nominee. It comes as Republicans in the Senate have vowed that they will vote on Trump's Supreme Court nominee before the presidential election while Democrats have sworn that they will fight against her confirmation tooth-and-nail. Trump has said he will announce his nominee to fill the seat at 5 p.m. on Saturday as members of the Senate and outside judicial activists on both sides have spent the week spinning up their massive political machines in anticipation of what is likely to...
    Conservative legal experts say the chances are slim that the Supreme Court will invalidate Obamacare, even with President Trump’s pick for a new justice. Jonathan Adler, a conservative law professor at Case Western Reserve University and critic of GOP-led states’ legal argument to throw out Obamacare, called the threat to the law “grossly overstated.” “I don't think it's a case that has a real likelihood of succeeding,” Adler told the Washington Examiner. “The arguments are bad.” The Supreme Court on Nov. 10 will hear oral arguments in the case of California v. Texas that could result in the elimination of the entire law, also known as the Affordable Care Act. A decision could be reached with or...
    The Supreme Court didn’t always have nine justices, and that number is not set in the Constitution. The number of justices has been changed on multiple occasions throughout our nation’s history, each time for a similarly partisan reason—namely to give one party more influence over the court’s membership. And the first back and forth over the number of justices was a struggle between two of our most prominent Founding Father presidents. Let me lay out a scenario: On Election Day, let’s say the American people defeat an incumbent president, and give control over both houses of Congress to the party of the president-elect. In a lame-duck act that completely contradicts the very recently expressed will of the people, the incumbent’s...
    Democrats plan to focus on health care -- and the idea that millions could lose it -- in the looming confirmation battle over President Trump's pending Supreme Court nominee. "It'll be a major focus," Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, told NBC News. "There are others." GINSBURG DEATH CASTS FRESH UNCERTAINTY ON THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT'S FUTURE Trump and other Republican leaders indicated after Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death on Friday they intended to move forward with filling the court's vacancy. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., appears to have secured enough votes to confirm Trump's nominee, although it's still unclear whether the vote could come before the November presidential election, or in the lame-duck session that takes place after the election but before...
    Washington (CNN)Sen. Doug Jones, a vulnerable Democratic senator up for reelection in the red state of Alabama, announced Friday he "will not support" President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee -- who has yet to be named -- ahead of Election Day."I will not support the confirmation of any Supreme Court justice nominee, regardless of who it might be. I will not support that nominee before the outcome of the November 3 election has been determined," said Jones during a Facebook livestream."We should not force the country into a brutal and divisive partisan fight to confirm a Supreme Court justice ... while Americans are already voting to choose their next president," Jones added. Jones criticized Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch...
    Her memory demands that Senate Democrats do everything in their power to give her a worthy successor. Honestly, there isn't much that Senate Democrats can do to fully prevent a Republican majority, slim though it may be, from seating another Supreme Court nominee from Donald Trump, illegitimate as that nomination might be. What they can do, however, is delay it until after the election. And after the election, the chances of blocking it are probably better. There could very well be some defeated Republicans who won't have anything to lose anymore and might just decide not to seal their legacies with something so ignoble as this. Additionally, if they can delay throughout November, Democrats will likely have a new member—Arizona's...
    One week after her passing U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being honored Friday morning with a ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda. Justice Ginsburg becomes the first woman and the first person of Jewish faith to lie in state in Statuary Hall. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi honored the beloved jurist, and welcomed attendees come to pay their respects. The casket of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is carried up the steps of the U.S. Capitol, past House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, where she will be the first woman to lie in state. https://t.co/FZh8qHi8MG pic.twitter.com/ESeiEsmSbb — ABC News (@ABC) September 25, 2020 Conspicuous in their absence are the Majority Leader...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy did not attend the service honoring Ginsburg. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell skipped a service on Capitol Hill honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg, NBC News' Kasie Hunt reported. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy was also not in attendance at the ceremony honoring Ginsburg — the pioneering Supreme Court justice who died one week ago after a battle with pancreatic cancer. It's unclear why neither man attended the service. Spokespeople for both McConnell and McCarthy did not immediately return request for comment.
    During an interview aired on Thursday’s broadcast of the Fox News Channel’s “Fox News @ Night,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) said that it is “very difficult” to predict how President Donald Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court, or any Supreme Court nominee will vote once they get on the court. McConnell said, “Well, it’s very difficult to predict how people vote when they get on the Supreme Court. It’s a lifetime appointment, the founders set it up that way on purpose, and predictions about how people are going to vote when they get on the supreme court have been consistently wrong. I mean, you should have heard the things that they said about John Paul Stevens or about...
    Amy McGrath, a Democrat who is running against Kentucky senator Mitch McConnell, visited the memorial. "I really believe that Attorney General Cameron should release the full grand jury investigative report because Louivillians, Kentuckians, and the family of Breonna and everyone should be able to see that to make that judgment. Part of what we are as a nation is making sure we have transparency and to me that's a really important piece of this. Let's have a transparent investigation, lets release it to everyone". "In the meantime, let's focus on making sure we elect leaders who will work for change." Daniel Shular/Insider People flocked to a Louisville memorial honoring Breonna Taylor, a Black woman who was shot and killed...
            by Robert Romano  Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is under enormous pressure from his Democratic colleagues not to confirm whoever President Donald Trump may nominate to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court before the election. But in truth, there is simply no reason, neither constitutional nor political, for Trump and McConnell to wait at all. The Constitution simply states, in Article II, Section 2, “The President… shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint … judges of the Supreme Court…” Meaning, under the law, when there is a vacancy on the nation’s high court, President Trump can make his nomination whenever he wants, and...
    Let’s take a minute and imagine — or pretend — that President Trump has a grand strategy governing his campaign. That offers a chance to provide the only remotely positive gloss that can be applied to his dumbfounding refusal to say point blank there would be a “peaceful transition of power” after the election. The grand strategy would be “The Scramble.” Old guys like me have fond memories of the scrambling quarterback Fran Tarkenton, who would get himself in trouble in the backfield, run backward 20 yards, then run forward 25 yards — and score a small gain after a huge self-created melodrama. If the president wins this election in November, he will prove himself to be the Fran Tarkenton...
    By BRUCE SCHREINER and CLAIRE GALOFARO, Associated Press LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Democrat Amy McGrath called for fundamental change to combat “systemic racism" as the Senate candidate met Thursday with some of the Kentucky protesters seething over a grand jury's decision not to charge officers in the killing of Breonna Taylor. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, her Republican opponent, said peaceful protests offer a way to honor Taylor's memory. He defended the investigation by his political ally, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, into the Black woman's death The senator condemned incidents of property damage and gunfire that broke out during demonstrations in his hometown of Louisville. Two police officers were shot and wounded during the protests Wednesday evening. Nationwide protests...
    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Democrat Amy McGrath called for fundamental change to combat “systemic racism” as the Senate candidate met Thursday with some of the Kentucky protesters seething over a grand jury’s decision not to charge officers in the killing of Breonna Taylor. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, her Republican opponent, said peaceful protests offer a way to honor Taylor’s memory. He defended the investigation by his political ally, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, into the Black woman’s death The senator condemned incidents of property damage and gunfire that broke out during demonstrations in his hometown of Louisville. Two police officers were shot and wounded during the protests Wednesday evening. Nationwide protests over the deaths of Blacks by police...
    If President Trump loses the November election to Joe Biden, there will be "an orderly transfer of power" in January, just as there has been "every four years since Washington was elected for a second term in 1792," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told "Fox News @ Night" in an exclusive interview Thursday. President Trump's declined to make a similar commitment at a White House news conference Wednesday after a reporter asked: "Win, lose or draw in this election, will you commit here today for a peaceful transferal of power after the election?” WATCH THE EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH SENATE MAJORITY LEADER MITCH MCCONNELL ON 'FOX NEWS @ NIGHT' THURSDAY AT 11 PM ET "We're going to have to see what happens,” Trump answered. "You know...
    Democrats in the House of Representatives are planning to introduce a bill Tuesday that would impose a term limit of 18 years on Supreme Court justices. The legislation would allow every new president to nominate two justices each term and would cancel lifetime appointments. This comes just days after the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died and President Donald Trump and Senate Republicans are moving forward with a nominee before the November election, Reuters reported. The legislation is titled the Supreme Court Term Limits and Regular Appointments Act and will be introduced by Democratic California Rep. Ro Khanna, Democratic Massachusets Rep. Joe Kennedy III, and Democratic Virginia Rep. Don Beyer. “It would save the country a lot of...
    Kentucky Democratic Senate candidate Amy McGrath on Thursday called on state Attorney General Daniel Cameron (R) to release the grand jury report in the killing of Breonna Taylor. “Breonna's family and Kentucky deserve to know what happened the night she was killed. The fact that the grand jury did not even consider charges in the events that led to her death created confusion and anger,” McGrath tweeted. (1/3) Breonna's family and Kentucky deserve to know what happened the night she was killed. The fact that the grand jury did not even consider charges in the events that led to her death created confusion and anger.— Amy McGrath (@AmyMcGrathKY) September 24, 2020 (2/3) AG Cameron needs to release the...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has spoken out after a grand jury decided against indicting the police officers responsible for the killing of Breonna Taylor for murder. Speaking on the Senate floor Thursday, McConnell (R-Ky.) described 26-year-old Taylor’s killing as “tragic.” “I’ve spoken repeatedly in recent months about the tragic killing of Breonna Taylor in my hometown of Louisville, the need for justice, and the healing work ahead for our community,” the Kentucky Republican said at the start of his remarks. Louisville authorities were looking into Jamarcus Glover, Taylor’s ex-boyfriend whom she had broken up with months prior to the botched raid, and found no drugs on the premises. Taylor’s family has maintained that she had no involvement in any...
    Getty Lamar Jackson before a Ravens-Chiefs game. Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson watched with the rest of the world as Breonna Taylor did not receive justice for her death, and the quarterback had something to say on the matter. Speaking to the media on Thursday, Jackson was asked about Taylor’s death and the outcome of the case. To say he was disappointed was an understatement, but in typical Jackson fashion, he let the world know in as classy and eloquent terms as possible. Lamar Jackson on Breonna Taylor: "The land of the free, but I dont really feel like its been that way for us Black people sometimes." (via @Ravens)pic.twitter.com/QKtFpqew5f — Sports Illustrated (@SInow) September 24, 2020 ...
    Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky speaking at the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland.Gage Skidmore from Peoria, AZ, United States of America / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0) The most quintessentially feckless “The Democrats!™” reaction to Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death Friday night came from—who else?—Chuck Schumer, who tweeted the same words Mitch McConnell used four years ago to justify refusing Merrick Garland a vote, as if pointing out hypocrisy would shame McConnell into doing the right thing. One hour and four minutes later, Mitch McConnell confirmed what we already knew: He doesn’t care about hypocrisy, and he has no shame.  In a Friday night memo to his caucus, McConnell halfheartedly split hairs, pretending there was a principled reason to sideline Garland but ram through whatever Federalist...
    White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said that protesters’ chants at President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden on Trump's refusal to commit to peaceful transfer of power: 'What country are we in?' Romney: 'Unthinkable and unacceptable' to not commit to peaceful transition of power Two Louisville police officers shot amid Breonna Taylor grand jury protests MORE when he visited the Supreme Court on Thursday to pay respects Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgHarris faces pivotal moment with Supreme Court battle Club for Growth to spend million in ads for Trump Supreme Court nominee FEC flags McConnell campaign over suspected accounting errors MORE, who died Friday, were “appalling” and “disrespectful.”  “The chants were appalling but certainly to be expected when you’re in the...
    Facebook/Makenze Cameron Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron pictured with his wife, Makenze Cameron, Makenze Evans is Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s wife. In September 2020, online rumors surfaced that Cameron was married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Elizabeth Kuhn, the communications director for Cameron’s office, confirmed to Heavy that the rumor is “untrue.” McConnell has three daughters, Porter, Claire and Eleanor. All of his children were born during the Kentucky senator’s first marriage to Sherrill Redmon which lasted between 1968 and 1980. McConnell married his current site, Elaine Chao, in February 1993. Chao has spoken publicly about her regrets at not having children of her own. Cameron married Makenze Evans in a ceremony in Louisville, Kentucky,...
    A group of about 100 protesters in Washington, D.C., headed to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY)’s home early Thursday morning for a “wake up call,” according to video posted on social media. They carried a sign that said, “We can’t sleep so neither should Mitch” and “Our Future Our Justice,” Washingtonian reporter Jane Recker reported. McConnell is the senior senator for Kentucky, where the grand jury decision in the police officer-involved shooting of Breonna Taylor, 26, was announced on Wednesday. Close to 20 police in front of McConnell’s residence. Police have blocked off both intersections, the GoGo truck is just half a block away #DCProtests pic.twitter.com/1JKgpThzL5 — Jane Recker (@janerecker) September 24, 2020 According to Recker, police were already...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday said President Trump will leave office if he’s defeated Nov. 3 by Democratic candidate Joe Biden. “The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th. There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792,” McConnell (R-Ky.) tweeted. McConnell weighed in as Democrats expressed horror at Trump’s apparent refusal to commit at a Wednesday night press briefing to a peaceful transition of power. Trump said he intends to win. Within an hour of McConnell’s tweet, Trump told Fox News host Brian Kilmeade on his radio show that he does intend to leave office if Biden wins, but that he expects the Supreme Court...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell criticized the violent riots in his hometown of Louisville, Kentucky, on Thursday after ruling from a grand jury to charge one of three officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor. McConnell called Taylor’s death “tragic” but also mentioned that he has full confidence in Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron and the grand jury investigation. The Senate Majority Leader went on to slam the violence and riots committed in Louisville, Kentucky, in which two officers were shot. Buildings also had their windows smashed in and there were fires set across the city. “I’ve spoken repeatedly in recent months about the tragic killing of Breonna Taylor in my hometown of Louisville, the need for justice, and...
    By Aamer Madhani and Kevin Freking | Associated Press WASHINGTON — Congressional leaders from both parties, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, swiftly pushed back Thursday after President Donald Trump declined to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses the Nov. 3 presidential election. Trump said during a Wednesday news conference, “We’re going to have to see what happens,” responding to a question about committing to the results. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” McConnell and other leaders of Trump’s Republican Party had no hesitation in committing to an orderly transfer if Trump loses. “The winner of the November 3rd...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other top Republicans on Thursday repudiated President Donald Trump’s refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power and assured American voters that November’s election outcome will be accepted. Trump declined to embrace a peaceful transfer on Wednesday in response to a reporter’s question, and said he expected his upcoming election battle with Democrat Joe Biden to be settled by the Supreme Court. Democrats accused Trump of threatening American democracy and further politicizing his upcoming choice to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg by suggesting the yet-to-be named nominee would intervene...
    The first of three presidential debates is scheduled for this Tuesday, September 29 and will be moderated by Fox News’ Chris Wallace, who leans conservative but is by no means one of President Donald Trump’s mindless sycophants. Trump and his Democratic challenger, former Vice President Joe Biden, can both expect some hardball questions from the Fox News host. Conservative columnist Jennifer Rubin laid out how there are many issues on which Trump is vulnerable, suggesting questions on everything from the U.S. Supreme Court to health care. It remains to be seen who Trump will nominate for the U.S. Supreme Court following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, but it’s obvious that Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) pushed back against President Donald Trump’s alarming refusal to commit to a peaceful transition of power if he loses the general election in November. The Kentucky lawmaker took to Twitter on Thursday morning to address the situation. “The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th,” McConnell tweeted. “There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792.” The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th. There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792. — Leader McConnell (@senatemajldr) September 24, 2020 While McConnell’s tweet suggests he will take...
    Kentucky's black Attorney General Daniel Cameron who was hailed a 'star' by Donald Trump for his handling of the Breonna Taylor investigation had his mentor Mitch McConnell as a guest at his wedding just last month. Cameron, who is the state's first black attorney general after being elected last year, announced on Wednesday that a grand jury had not sought criminal charges against the three police officers for their roles in the black EMT's death.  The grand jury's decision to indict one officer on wanton endangerment charges because his bullets were fired into a neighbor's apartment came after a six-month investigation carried out by Cameron's office.  The investigation was still underway when the 34-year-old attorney general tied the knot with his...
    Republican leader Mitch McConnell has insisted there will be an "orderly" post-election transition - something the president has cast doubt on. Mr McConnell said regardless of who wins the 3 November presidential election, there will be a peaceful inauguration on 20 January. A day earlier, President Donald Trump refused to commit to this, saying "we'll have to see what happens". Mr Trump has questioned the integrity of US postal voting in recent months. The president currently trails his challenger, Democrat Joe Biden, in national opinion polls with 40 days to go until the election. As many more Americans will be casting their votes by post this year due to the pandemic, Mr Trump has been questioning the security of...
    Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, called President Trump's answer to a question about the peaceful transfer of power regarding the 2020 election "unthinkable and unacceptable," while Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell emphasized that "there will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792." McConnell insisted that Republicans are not rejecting the importance of a peaceful transfer of power. "The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th," he wrote on Twitter on Thursday. "There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792." Meanwhile, Romney blasted Trump's remarks on Wednesday by making a comparison to Belarus, where citizens are protesting the reelection of President Alexander Lukashenko, which the opposing parties say was rigged....
    Hillary Clinton suggested that Senate Republicans are rushing to confirm President Trump's pending Supreme Court nominee for one singular purpose: to repeal the Affordable Care Act. “Ultimately this fight, it seems to me, is about health care,” Clinton, the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, said Wednesday during the 2020 Texas Tribune Festival. "Health care is literally before the court." “Trump and the Republicans led by Mitch McConnell have been trying to get rid of health care for years ever since President Obama passed the Affordable Care Act,” she continued. “Let’s be sure we understand: What the Republicans are doing is rushing an appointment to the court to repeal the Affordable Care Act and strip away health care for many millions of Americans ...The Democrats need to make that...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Republicans including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pushed back Thursday after President Donald Trump again declined to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses the Nov. 3 presidential election. Trump said during a Wednesday news conference, “We’re going to have to see what happens,” responding to a question. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” But McConnell and other top Republicans had no hesitation in committing to an orderly transfer if Trump loses. “The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th,” McConnell said in a tweet. “There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every...
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) took to Twitter to indirectly respond to President Donald Trump’s refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses the election in November — writing that “there will be an orderly transition.”  “The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th. There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792,” McConnell wrote in a Thursday tweet. The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th. There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792. — Leader McConnell (@senatemajldr) September 24, 2020 When asked by a reporter if...
    By Susan Heavey and Doina Chiacu WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell joined other Republican lawmakers in rallying to the defense of constitutional government on Thursday, after President Donald Trump refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power following the Nov. 3 election. "The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th. There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792," McConnell wrote in a tweet. Several other lawmakers came out strongly in favor of a peaceful transition of power following the Republican president's comments on Wednesday, though none criticized him directly. "The peaceful transfer of power is enshrined in our Constitution and fundamental to the...
    AlterNet September 24, 2020 2:36PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on AlterNet. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-KY) re-election campaign is facing scrutiny from the Federal Election Commission (FEC) and he is now being required to answer questions regarding suspected accounting errors. The letter and a 60-page report, written by FEC campaign analyst Susan Worthington to McConnell's Senate Committee, were sent to McConnell's campaign treasurer, Larry J. Steinberg on Monday. The committee pointed out "Apparent Excessive, Prohibited, and Impermissible Contributions" regarding donations recorded in McConnell's July quarterly report that suggests multiple contributions may have exceeded the legal limits. : Worthington also pointed out that there were contributions "received after the 2020 primary election that are designated for the 2020 primary. "These contributions...
    Protesters made noise in front of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s home in D.C.’s Stanton Park neighborhood early Thursday morning over his pledge to move forward with a vote on a nominee to fill the vacancy left by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court. (Courtesy Jenna Farineau) Courtesy Jenna Farineau Dozens of protesters marched along the street in front of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s home in D.C.’s Stanton Park neighborhood early Thursday morning. Courtesy Sunrise Movement (1/2) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. Dozens of protesters marched along the street in front of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s home in D.C.’s Stanton Park...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said there will be a peaceful transition of power regardless of who wins the November election. After President Trump refused to make such a commitment in response to a reporter's question on Wednesday, the Kentucky Republican became the highest-ranking Republican to assure the public that there will be no underhanded scheme to undermine the vote. "The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th. There will be an orderly transition just as there has been every four years since 1792," the GOP leader said in a Thursday morning tweet. The winner of the November 3rd election will be inaugurated on January 20th. There will be an orderly transition just as...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFEC flags McConnell campaign over suspected accounting errors Poll: 59 percent think president elected in November should name next Supreme Court justice Mark Kelly: Arizona Senate race winner should be sworn in 'promptly' MORE (R-Ky.) said on Thursday that there would be an "orderly" transition of power in 2021, after President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden on Trump's refusal to commit to peaceful transfer of power: 'What country are we in?' Romney: 'Unthinkable and unacceptable' to not commit to peaceful transition of power Two Louisville police officers shot amid Breonna Taylor grand jury protests MORE refused to commit to a peaceful hand off of power if he loses in November.  "The winner of the November...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s (R-KY) re-election campaign is facing scrutiny from the Federal Election Commission (FEC) and he is now being required to answer questions regarding suspected accounting errors. The letter and a 60-page report, written by FEC campaign analyst Susan Worthington to McConnell’s Senate Committee, were sent to McConnell’s campaign treasurer, Larry J. Steinberg on Monday. The committee pointed out “Apparent Excessive, Prohibited, and Impermissible Contributions” regarding donations recorded in McConnell’s July quarterly report that suggests multiple contributions may have exceeded the legal limits. Worthington also pointed out that there were contributions “received after the 2020 primary election that are designated for the 2020 primary. “These contributions may only be accepted to the extent that the committee has net debts outstanding...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer have escalated their rhetorical war, with Schumer hammering McConnell over the alleged "fiction" precedent Republicans say they are following on Supreme Court nominations while McConnell called Schumer "uniquely non-credible" on the topic of judicial nominations, citing comments Schumer made while George W. Bush was president. The verbal barbs are just the beginning of what is likely to be one of the nastiest political fights in recent American history over Republicans' plans to confirm a successor to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the presidential election. After a slew of moderates and electorally vulnerable members of their caucus came out to say they support moving ahead with a nomination,...
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy threatened to call for a vote to oust House Speaker Nancy Pelosi if she makes an effort to impeach President Trump to block him from nominating a Supreme Court justice. “I will make you this one promise, listening to the speaker on television this weekend, if she tries to move for an impeachment based upon the president following the Constitution, I think there will be a move on the floor to no longer, or the question of her being Speaker,” McCarthy (R-Calif.) told reporters on Capitol Hill Wednesday. “She may think she has a quiver — we do too,” he said. In an appearance on ABC News Sunday, Pelosi refused to rule out trying to impeach Trump...
    The Federal Election Commission (FEC) flagged Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPelosi: Trump hurrying to fill SCOTUS seat so he can repeal ObamaCare Senate GOP aims to confirm Trump court pick by Oct. 29: report Trump argues full Supreme Court needed to settle potential election disputes MORE’s (R-Ky.) campaign over suspected accounting errors and is asking the campaign to respond to issues the commission flagged by late October.  The FEC sent McConnell’s re-election campaign a letter dated Monday requesting information about the campaign’s report that appeared to go against FEC rules after a preliminary review. The letter is signed by campaign finance analyst Susan Worthington.  The FEC wrote that McConnell’s report discloses “one or more contributions” that appear...
    The super PAC aligned with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell raised $37.4 million in August and entered September with $126.2 million to spend defending Republicans in the fall elections. Senate Leadership Fund’s August haul was dominated by $25 million in contributions from Republican megadonors Sheldon and Miriam Adelson and $4 million from Steve Wynn, the wealthy Las Vegas casino magnate and former finance chairman of the Republican National Committee, according to Federal Election Commission filings. SLF is investing its money in television advertising and digital outreach to protect the Republican Party’s three-seat majority. Republican Senate incumbents are under fire from well-funded Democratic challengers in at least seven states. Democratic candidates have raised unusually large sums of campaign cash, putting...
    On Tuesday, the official death count from the coronavirus pandemic in the United States passed 200,000. A memorial was placed in front of the Washington Monument to mark this grim milestone, and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi there not just to share the grief, but in anger. “This was preventable. Not all of it, but much of it,” Pelosi said, citing a failure to “embrace science over politics” in leadership, a not-so-oblique reference to the way that Donald Trump has, at every turn, either been incompetent or actively undermined efforts to slow the spread of the virus. Meanwhile, Trump was running his mouth at reporters on the White House lawn Tuesday afternoon, but on one subject — the 200,000 people he let die — he was uncharacteristically...
    Alex Henderson September 23, 2020 7:26PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on AlterNet. North Carolina is among the swing states that reporters will be keeping an especially close eye on between now and November 3. Polls have been showing a close presidential race in North Carolina, which is also where incumbent GOP Sen. Thom Tillis and his Democratic challenger, Cal Cunningham, are battling for a U.S. Senate seat. And North Carolina's U.S. Senate race, according to Associated Press reporter Gary D. Robertson, has become even more intense following the death of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September 18. President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are pushing for a Supreme Court nominee to be confirmed as quickly as...
    Joe Biden has weighed in on Supreme Court vacancies throughout his 47-year career in politics, as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, vice president, and now Democratic presidential nominee -- but his stance on whether the Senate should take up nominees during election years has evolved. Now, Biden’s past comments on Supreme Court nominations and confirmations have come back into this spotlight this month after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. SCHUMER SAYS MCCONNELL 'DEFILED' THE SENATE AND 'MAY VERY WELL DESTROY IT' OVER SUPREME COURT VACANCIES President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell -- despite pushing to delay consideration of a Supreme Court justice four years ago when Barack Obama was president and Republicans held the Senate -- have vowed...
    President Trump has already earned a remarkable number of historic achievements as a candidate and as president. For a man who ran to change the direction of government, he has succeeded more than any analyst would have thought possible. First, as a brand new candidate, he took on 15 other Republicans and a hostile news media (go back and watch those debates and note how often the most hostile questions and the greatest expressions of scorn and contempt were aimed at candidate Trump). As the Republican nominee, he defeated the Hillary Clinton machine and the elite media. VideoHowever, these two remarkable achievements were never fully acknowledged because victory on election night was repudiated psychologically. The propaganda media of the left,...
    Amanda Marcotte September 23, 2020 5:00PM (UTC) On Tuesday, the official death count from the coronavirus pandemic in the United States passed 200,000. A memorial was placed in front of the Washington Monument to mark this grim milestone, and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi there not just to share the grief, but in anger.  "This was preventable. Not all of it, but much of it," Pelosi said, citing a failure to "embrace science over politics" in leadership, a not-so-oblique reference to the way that Donald Trump has, at every turn, either been incompetent or actively undermined efforts to slow the spread of the virus.  : Meanwhile, Trump was running his mouth at reporters on the White House lawn Tuesday afternoon, but on one subject...
    The November election may be 41 days away, but Senate Republicans appear ready to hustle to get their Supreme Court pick on the bench. While Senate GOP leaders have made no official comments on scheduling for President Trump’s incoming nominee to the nation’s highest court, hearings could begin as early as Monday, Oct. 12 and a confirmation vote on the floor could be scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 29, one Republican aide familiar with the planning tells the Associated Press. As the country mourned the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday, the commander-in-chief and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said they would move forward on a vote for her replacement. Currently, Republicans hold a 53-47 majority...
    President Trump repeatedly says that he’s accomplished more than any president in history. I’ve never heard anyone ask him to lay out specifically what he means by that. He can try to take credit for signing big tax cuts for the wealthy, but that was passed by the Republican Congress with little input from him. It’s true that his executive branch agencies have overturned many environmental rules and other regulations, but he hasn’t been involved and clearly doesn’t know the details. Trump’s corruption has given his consigliere, Attorney General Bill Barr, the opportunity to further his own “powerful executive” theory. His craven pandering to white supremacists and the evangelical right has kept the base bonded tightly to the Republican Party....
    (CNN)No one would ever say that the political marriage between Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President Donald Trump is a match made in heaven. It's nothing like that, and nothing near love. It's more an arranged marriage between two cold-blooded politicians whose goals often coincide. Nothing more, nothing less.Except now, the men need each other, maybe more than ever -- and each will do whatever it takes to get another conservative on the Supreme Court.For Trump, the rationale is simple: He believes the debate over replacing the late Justice Antonin Scalia helped him win in 2016. And he is convinced it will help him again, although he may be very wrong about that. For McConnell, this is not about...
    Heather Digby Parton September 23, 2020 12:45PM (UTC) President Trump repeatedly says that he's accomplished more than any president in history. I've never heard anyone ask him to lay out specifically what he means by that. He can try to take credit for signing big tax cuts for the wealthy, but that was passed by the Republican Congress with little input from him. It's true that his executive branch agencies have overturned many environmental rules and other regulations, but he hasn't been involved and clearly doesn't know the details. Trump's corruption has given his consigliere, Attorney General Bill Barr, the opportunity to further his own "powerful executive" theory. His craven pandering to white supremacists and the evangelical right has...
    Joe Biden didn’t mince words as Mitch McConnell and Donald Trump abuse and corrupt the Constitution in their rush to fill Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat on the Supreme Court. “The infection this president has unleashed on our democracy can be fatal. Enough. Enough. Enough.” He has since added that expanding the Court is a legitimate question. Biden sees McConnell’s desire for total unitary executive, judiciary and legislative control for what it is: A tyranny of extremism.
    The illustrious life of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg came to a solemn end Friday, and with her passing comes a perfect storm of political urgency and brinkmanship, leaving us precious little time to reflect on her extraordinary life and her decades-long defense of equality under the law. For those of us in the legal community — regardless of our political persuasions — Ginsburg’s death leaves us with both a massive loss to grieve and a stellar legacy to uphold. She was the second woman to serve on the high court and a legal pioneer for gender equality. Her scathing opinions earned her the nickname “Notorious RBG” — a riff on a famous rapper — and gave rise to...
    Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, submitted legislation to Congress late Tuesday that would prevent any party from “packing” the court and limit the Supreme Court to nine justices. “Any attempt to increase the number of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States or ‘pack the court’ would undermine our democratic institutions and destroy the credibility of our nation’s highest court,” Jordan wrote in the resolution. The congressman’s latest bill comes amid partisan fighting in Washington following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. President Trump announced on Twitter Tuesday that he will be declaring his nominee for the Supreme Court Saturday, a move that Democrats have called unjust based on Senate Republicans' claims in 2016 that a Supreme Court...
    President Donald Trump said he will announce his nominee for the Supreme Court at 5 pm on Saturday. 'I’m getting very close to having a final decision made, very close,' Trump told reporters at the White House on Tuesday evening, of his pick to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Judge Amy Coney Barrett is reported to be at the top of his short list with Judge Barbara Lagoa in second. Trump has vowed to pick a woman to replace Ginsburg, a feminist icon and hero to liberals.  Whomever he picks, the president is expected to shift the court to the right with his decision.  Saturday's announcement will come shortly before the president leaves for Pennsylvania, where he will...
    Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on Tuesday weighed in on the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s dying wish for the next president to select her replacement. McConnell on RBGs dying wish for next president to pick her replacement: "I prefer another thing she said recently, which was she thought the number of the Supreme Court ought to be nine" McConnells blocking of Merrick Garland left SCOTUS with 8 justices for more than a year pic.twitter.com/MSmdJq5uXI — CBS News (@CBSNews) September 22, 2020 A transcript is as follows: REPORTER: You’ve spoken highly of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Why not listen to her dying wish, apparently, to allow the next president to make this decision? SEN. MITCH MCCONNELL: I prefer another thing she...
    By Matthew Daly | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The “H” word — hypocrisy — is suddenly in vogue at the Capitol as lawmakers debate how quickly to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Court following the death of liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has vowed that President Donald Trump’s as-yet unnamed nominee will receive a vote on the Senate floor “this year,” but has been careful not to say exactly when that will happen. Democrats accuse the Kentucky Republican of blatant hypocrisy after McConnell refused to consider President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, Judge Merrick Garland, eight months before the 2016 election. Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer took to the Senate floor Monday to...
    Lacking the votes in the Senate to stop a new Supreme Court nominee from being confirmed, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., accused Republicans of stealing the newly open seat by moving forward to confirm President Trump’s upcoming pick. “If Leader McConnell presses forward, the Republican majority will have stolen two Supreme Court seats four years apart — using completely contradictory rationales,” the New York Democrat told reporters on Tuesday. Schumer said: “Leader McConnell’s actions may very well destroy the institution of the Senate." The minority leader’s harsh words come as Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has promised to bring President Trump’s nominee to the floor for a vote before Inauguration Day. Schumer stood by his iteration that “everything is on...
    WASHINGTON – Sen. Mitt Romney is having a homecoming moment. The Utah Republican and 2012 GOP presidential nominee incensed President Donald Trump and Republicans with his impeachment vote. But on Tuesday he cleared the way for his party to replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on Friday at age 87, overcoming Democratic objections that it's too close to the Nov. 3 election to consider a nominee. By lunchtime Tuesday, “#HesaRepublican" was trending on Twitter. Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, has never run as anything but a Republican. But his loyalty to the GOP under Trump's control has long been questioned and mocked by the president and his supporters. Romney, in turn, has called Trump unfit to serve....
    Senate Republicans are nearly unanimously in support of a vote on a new Supreme Court justice this year, and most want it to happen before the election. Republican senators huddled at a closed-door lunch at their political headquarters near the Capitol. Those in the room said lawmakers largely want a vote to take place ahead of an election that could cost the GOP the Senate and the White House. “I think we need to move here, with all deliberate speed,” Sen. Josh Hawley, a Missouri Republican, said. Republicans on Tuesday locked in the votes needed to take up a nomination, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has not decided when this year it should occur. Hawley and other Republicans believe...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Tuesday he will determine the timing of a Senate vote to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, after the Senate Judiciary Committee recommends a nominee for confirmation. McConnell told a news conference that the next step will be for Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham to handle in committee the nominee that President Donald Trump is expected to announce on Saturday. "When the nomination comes out of committee, I'll decide when and how to proceed," McConnell said. (Reporting by David Morgan; editing by Jonathan Oatis) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    Republican Sen. Richard Burr defended President Trump on Tuesday by saying he has “every right under the Constitution” to nominate an individual to the Supreme Court vacancy left by late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, adding that he believes the Senate should consider that nominee “as early as possible.” Burr, R-N.C., came out in support of the Senate taking up the president’s eventual nominee as the math is tipping in favor of Trump and Republicans who want to replace Ginsburg with a conservative justice. SCHUMER SAYS MCCONNELL 'DEFILED' THE SENATE AND 'MAY VERY WELL DESTROY IT' OVER SUPREME COURT VACANCIES “The President has every right under the Constitution to nominate the individual of his choosing to fill the current Supreme Court...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY ANDY SULLIVAN AND RICHARD COWAN President Donald Trump’s push to widen the U.S. Supreme Court’s conservative majority received a boost on Tuesday as a longtime rival, Republican Senator Mitt Romney, said the Senate should move forward with a vote on his replacement for liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Romney’s decision left Democrats with few hopes of blocking Senate confirmation of the Republican president’s third appointment to the high court, which would give it a 6-3 conservative majority. Trump has said he plans to announce his nominee by Saturday. Romney, the party’s 2012 presidential nominee, is one of the few...
    Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer slammed Mitch McConnell on Tuesday, saying the majority leader has “defiled” the Senate over Supreme Court vacancies and “may very well destroy it.” During remarks on the Senate floor, Schumer, D-N.Y., blasted President Trump and McConnell, R-Ky., for pushing to fill the vacancy on the high court left by late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the 2020 presidential election. TRUMP: SUPREME COURT PICK TO BE ANNOUNCED SATURDAY FROM THE WHITE HOUSE “You would think that after the Republican majority led a historic blockade just four years ago to keep open a vacancy on the Supreme Court because it was an election year, they would have the honor and decency to apply their own rule when the...
    Meghan McCain said Tuesday on “The View” that she believed Republicans should go forward with plans to nominate and confirm a replacement for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. McCain explained that she had never even considered a scenario where Republicans did not push to replace Ginsburg, who passed away Friday from metastatic pancreatic cancer. But she also warned that Democrats would not take that quietly and there would eventually be a “payout.” (RELATED: ‘I Was Completely Radicalized’: Meghan McCain Says Kavanaugh Hearings ‘Changed The Game’) WATCH: Whoopi Goldberg tossed the question to co-host Sunny Hostin first, asking whether she thought Democrats had any “moves” left that could stall the Republicans in their efforts to replace Ginsburg. “I don’t...