2020-09-18@22:21:31 GMT
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    The state Health Department is illegally withholding information about the number of nursing home residents who died of COVID-19 in hospitals so it can intentionally undercount fatalities and tout New York’s response to the pandemic, a new lawsuit charges. The Empire Center for Public Policy, an Albany-based think tank, filed a Freedom of Information Law request for the data on Aug. 3 and was later told that it couldn’t have the records until Nov. 5, the court papers filed Friday allege. The explanation given was that “a diligent search for responsive documents is still being conducted,” according to the Empire Center’s suit filed in Albany state Supreme Court. But daily tallies of all nursing home residents who’ve died from the...
    Residents in nursing homes across the country will now be allowed to welcome visitors for the first time in six months.  The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced a ban on family members visiting nursing facilities back in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  Exceptions were made only for critical care and end-of-life situations.  But on Friday, the organization lifted that ban, effective immediately,  following widespread complaints that nursing home patients were suffering from anxiety and depression without visits from loved ones.  All nursing homes across the United States must now allow outdoor visits or risk potential sanctions if they refuse to do so.  Residents in nursing homes across the country will now be allowed to welcome visitors for...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – State versus federal? Which data set nursing homes should rely on as a benchmark for coronavirus testing has been a pressing question for Florida facilities the past several weeks as they begin using rapid testing kits provided by the federal government. Agency for Health Care Administration Secretary Mary Mayhew gave Florida long-term care officials the answer Thursday, when she said that after negotiations with the federal government, nursing homes should rely on state data. Federal rules require nursing homes to conduct tests based on weekly coronavirus infection levels in the counties where they are located. Download The New CBS4 News App Here Under a Sept. 2 interim federal rule, nursing homes in counties with...
    New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signed a bill Wednesday creating a task force on long-term care quality and safety, but one Republican senator says more investigation is needed as to why more than 7,000 residents of New Jersey’s long-term care residents died from COVID-19. The New Jersey Task Force on Long-Term Care Quality and Safety will study staffing shortages, emergency preparedness and expansion of into home and community-based care settings. Sen. Joe Pennacchio has called for a Senate Select Committee to investigate the circumstances that led to the deaths in long-term care facilities and veterans homes. Despite promises from the Senate president, the committee has never been approved, he said. “This administration has not been forthcoming when...
    A new report contains 27 major recommendations on how to safeguard nursing homes from transmission of the coronavirus. The Trump administration is claiming "resounding vindication" from an independent commission's report on the coronavirus crisis in nursing homes, but some panel members say that's a misinterpretation of their conclusion that much remains to be done to safeguard vulnerable residents. People in long-term care facilities represent less than 1% of the U.S. population but more than 40% of the coronavirus deaths, according to the COVID Tracking Project, which has tallied 77,000 deaths among residents and staff. Those harsh numbers are a sensitive political issue for Donald Trump, who is trying to hang...
    The Trump administration is claiming “resounding vindication” from an independent commissions report on the coronavirus crisis in nursing homes, but some panel members say that’s a misinterpretation of their conclusion that much remains to be done to safeguard vulnerable residents. People in long-term care facilities represent less than 1% of the U.S. population but more than 40% of the coronavirus deaths, according to the COVID Tracking Project, which has tallied 77,000 deaths among residents and staff. Those harsh numbers are a sensitive political issue for President Donald Trump, who is trying to hang on to support from older voters. Vice President Mike Pence planned to highlight the administrations work on nursing homes at an event Thursday with commission members. The...
    By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is claiming “resounding vindication” from an independent commission's report on the coronavirus crisis in nursing homes, but some panel members say that’s a misinterpretation of their conclusion that much remains to be done to safeguard vulnerable residents. People in long-term care facilities represent less than 1% of the U.S. population but more than 40% of the coronavirus deaths, according to the COVID Tracking Project, which has tallied 77,000 deaths among residents and staff. Those harsh numbers are a sensitive political issue for President Donald Trump, who is trying to hang on to support from older voters. Vice President Mike Pence planned to highlight the administration's work on nursing homes...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is claiming “resounding vindication” from an independent commission’s report on the coronavirus crisis in nursing homes, but some panel members say that’s a misinterpretation of their conclusion that much remains to be done to safeguard vulnerable residents. Nursing home residents account for less than 1% of the U.S. population but more than 40% of the coronavirus deaths, according to the COVID Tracking Project. That harsh disparity is a sensitive political issue for President Donald Trump, who is trying to hang on to support from older voters. Vice President Mike Pence planned to highlight the administration’s work on nursing homes at an event Thursday with commission members. The commission was set up by the...
    Three Republican state lawmakers from New York announced on Wednesday the creation of a petition campaign that calls on their Democratic colleagues to push legislation that would create an independent investigation behind the COVID-19-related nursing home deaths across the state. State Sens. Jim Tedisco and Daphne Jordan were joined by Assemblywoman Mary Beth Walsh, R-Ballston, at the state Capitol in Albany on Wednesday for the announcement. The three are among the bipartisan sponsors of a bill that would empanel a temporary commission that would have subpoena power to learn more about what happened in the state-licensed nursing homes during the pandemic. The decision by the Cuomo administration to force nursing homes to admit COVID-19 positive patients into their...
    Nursing homes will be offered a cut of a $2 billion federal fund as an “incentive” to get coronavirus rates lower than their local communities, according to a report Thursday. The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) cash will be split into two pools — with 80% going to those that get below their county’s infection rates, and the rest to those that keep deaths below expected thresholds, officials told Bloomberg Law. The fund provides “meaningful financial incentives” for nursing homes, which have been widely devastated by the pandemic, HHS senior adviser for health reform Jim Parker told Bloomberg Law. It will pay out $400 million each month until the end of the year — ending because HHS is...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Our state’s leading advocates for nursing homes and long-term care facilities are begging for help. KDKA investigator Meghan Schiller has an update on emergency funding that they say is desperately needed. Health care leaders say time is running out. Steve Tack runs Quality Life Services, family-owned nursing homes and personal care facilities. “Our staff have been absolutely incredible in how they’ve sacrificed themselves and the care of the residents that they dearly, dearly love,” said Tack. “But the challenges just continue to get larger and larger.” Challenges like understaffing, skyrocketing expenses and funding. “Expenses have increased for some facilities in Pennsylvania more than 200 percent in just the last six months,” said Zach Shamberg, president of the...
    By TODD RICHMOND, Associated Press MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin election officials decided Wednesday to stay with their decision not to allow special voting deputies into nursing homes to help residents cast absentee ballots in November's election out of concerns of spreading the coronavirus. State law allows local clerks to appoint deputies to enter nursing homes and help residents complete their ballots. The Wisconsin Elections Commission banned deputies from entering facilities in March as the coronavirus pandemic took hold. Republican Commissioner Robert Spindell asked commission staff during a Sept. 1 meeting to reconsider the ban. Commission Administrator Meagan Wolfe recommended in a memo to the commission that it should not reinstate the program. She wrote that staff consulted with state...
    By SUDHIN THANAWALA and JEFF AMY, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — For the first time since April, some families will be able to visit relatives in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities in Georgia under new rules for the coronavirus approved by the governor. Gov. Brian Kemp signed an executive order Tuesday that lifts a ban on visitors implemented on April 8, but not for all long-term care facilities. In counties where the infection rate remains high, visitors will still only be permitted under extremely limited circumstances. In another population group that's had a lot of focus on viral spread recently, the University of Georgia announced Wednesday that the pace of new infections eased last week, with the 39,000-student...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A top health official on Wednesday defended Michigan’s handling of nursing home residents infected with the deadly coronavirus, contending its performance has been “strong” compared to other states and again dismissing Republicans’ call for facilities that house only COVID-19 patients. Robert Gordon, director of the state Department of Health and Human Services, said just two states — Florida and Massachusetts — tried the approach and have since abandoned it. Majority GOP lawmakers and some Democrats have criticized letting recovering patients stay in or return to homes as long as they are isolated from uninfected residents. “There are many complexities to standing up and creating entire facilities for only COVID-positive people,” he told a joint legislative oversight...
    By DAVID EGGERT, Associated Press LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A top health official on Wednesday defended Michigan's handling of nursing home residents infected with the deadly coronavirus, contending its performance has been “strong” compared to other states and again dismissing Republicans' call for facilities that house only COVID-19 patients. Robert Gordon, director of the state Department of Health and Human Services, said just two states — Florida and Massachusetts — tried the approach and have since abandoned it. Majority GOP lawmakers and some Democrats have criticized letting recovering patients stay in or return to homes as long as they are isolated from uninfected residents. “There are many complexities to standing up and creating entire facilities for only COVID-positive people,” he...
    The New York Health Department on Tuesday relaxed nursing home restrictions for visitors amid protests from family members and industry groups. The new guidelines, which go into effect this Thursday, will allow visitors into nursing homes that have been COVID-19 free for 14 days.   The state halted most visits at care homes March 13 and started allowing visits at homes and assisted living facilities without a COVID-19 case among residents or staffers for 28 days. "We understand how trying it has been for New Yorkers to not see their loved ones and the challenges theyve had to endure during this unprecedented pandemic," State Department of Health Commissioner Howard Zucker said in a statement. "The number of nursing homes that...
    New York is easing up on its nursing home visitation restrictions as the state continues to combat the spread of COVID-19. On Tuesday, Sept. 15, state health officials announced that approximately 500 of the state’s 613 nursing homes can reopen to visitors if they have not had any positive COIVD-19 cases for at least 14 days, down from the previous mandate of no cases within 28 days. The new rules come into effect on Thursday, Sept. 17 following thousands of confirmed and presumed COVID-19-related deaths in nursing homes across the state, especially at the outset of the outbreak. "We understand how trying it has been for New Yorkers to not see their loved ones and the challenges they've had to...
    New York is easing up on its nursing home visitation restrictions as the state continues to combat the spread of COVID-19. On Tuesday, Sept. 15, state health officials announced that approximately 500 of the state’s 613 nursing homes can reopen to visitors if they have not had any positive COIVD-19 cases for at least 14 days, down from the previous mandate of no cases within 28 days. The new rules come into effect on Thursday, Sept. 17 following thousands of confirmed and presumed COVID-19-related deaths in nursing homes across the state, especially at the outset of the outbreak. "We understand how trying it has been for New Yorkers to not see their loved ones and the challenges they've had to...
    The Cuomo administration is relaxing coronavirus restrictions at nursing homes to allow family members in-person visits with loved ones for the first time since the pandemic hit in March. The announcement Tuesday by state Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker comes just three days after relatives of nursing home residents held a rally outside the governor’s Manhattan office protesting the restrictive policy. The new policy will resume limited visitation for facilities that have been without COVID-19 for at least 14 days — half the 28-day rule that has been in effect since early July. Nursing home advocates and family members said the 28-day infection free policy was too restrictive, with only a small percentage of the 613 nursing homes meeting the...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- New York health officials announced revisions to nursing home visitation guidelines across the state on Tuesday.The revised guidelines, which go into effect on Thursday, say that nursing homes can reopen to visitors if they have not had any positive COVID-19 cases for 14 days -- which is down from previous guidelines of 28 days.This updated guidance will allow eligible visitation in approximately 500 of the state's 613 nursing homes.New York State Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker released a statement on the revisions to the guidelines:"We understand how trying it has been for New Yorkers to not see their loved ones and the challenges they've had to endure during this unprecedented pandemic. The number of nursing homes...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG, Pa. (KDKA) — The Pennsylvania Department of Health conducted 635 nursing home inspections last month, including some facilities in our area. Inspectors were checking for violations, including compliance with COVID-19 restrictions. Statewide, the department issued nine sanctions and imposed more than $84,000 in civil penalties. Click here for a full list of inspections.
    By MARINA VILLENEUVE, Associated Press ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York will begin allowing visitors to see loved ones at nursing homes that have been coronavirus-free for 14 days, up from 28 days under previous rules, the health commissioner said Wednesday. The policy goes into effect Thursday, Health Commissioner Howard Zucker said. State health officials will monitor to ensure more visits don't increase COVID-19 cases, he said. “We understand how trying it has been for New Yorkers to not see their loved ones and the challenges they’ve had to endure during this unprecedented pandemic,” Zucker said. The state halted most visits at care homes March 13, though visits that were medically necessary or for end-of life services were allowed. In...
    Nursing homes in the United States make up more than 40% of our country’s coronavirus-related deaths even though nursing homes make up less than 10% of the total documented coronavirus cases in the U.S. On the one hand, this isn’t that surprising as nursing home residents make up some of the members of our country’s population who are at the highest risk. Nursing homes, however, have seen intensely high numbers, and it turns out those numbers have not been equally dispersed across the country. Why? A study led by George Washington University professor Adam Dean published findings in Health Affairs on Sept. 10. In it, they found that even though nursing homes were hit hard by the 2019 novel coronavirus, facilities with unionized healthcare workers saw...
    Some nursing homes nationwide are facing a new challenge with the coronavius, as about a dozen facilities are reporting an unusually high number of false positives when they use Becton Dickinson’s Veritor rapid-test machines, The Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday. This is particularly dangerous in nursing homes, because a resident incorrectly believed to have COVID-19 could be put in an area for infected patients, thus possibly exposing an uninfected senior citizen to the coronavirus. Nursing homes and other long-term care centers are connected to more than 70,000 COVID-19-related deaths nationwide, according to a Wall Street Journal survey of the data. A Becton Dickinson spokesman said in a statement that the company is investigating the situation to understand why “a...
    Medical-testing firm Becton Dickinson says it’s investigating false-positive coronavirus test results reported at nursing homes around the US. The New Jersey-based company, also known as BD, said a “small number” of nursing homes are reporting multiple false-positive COVID-19 tests from its Veritor Plus machine, which can deliver results in 15 minutes. Roughly a dozen sites have experienced a “significant number” of the incorrect results, while several others have only seen one or two, according to The Wall Street Journal, which first reported on the problem Tuesday. “Following our standard quality management system processes, upon learning of these reports, BD immediately contacted the sites, and we are actively investigating the situation to obtain additional details,” BD spokesman Troy Kirkpatrick told...
    (Reuters) - Becton Dickinson said on Tuesday it is investigating reports from U.S. nursing homes that its rapid coronavirus testing equipment is producing false-positive results. Tests conducted on the company's Veritor Plus system for detecting the virus are reporting multiple false positive results in some cases, Becton said. The inaccurate results were first reported by the Wall Street Journal. So far, the number of false-positive reports is small and the company has contacted the sites and is actively investigating the situation to obtain additional details, a spokesperson for Becton told Reuters in an email. The company, under its agreement with the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, provides more than 11,000 nursing homes in the country with COVID-19 tests...
    Medical-testing firm Becton Dickinson says it’s investigating false-positive coronavirus test results reported at nursing homes around the US. The New Jersey-based company, also known as BD, said a “small number” of nursing homes are reporting multiple false-positive COVID-19 tests from its Veritor Plus machine, which can deliver results in 15 minutes. Roughly a dozen sites have experienced a “significant number” of the incorrect results, while several others have only seen one or two, according to The Wall Street Journal, which first reported on the problem Tuesday. “Following our standard quality management system processes, upon learning of these reports, BD immediately contacted the sites, and we are actively investigating the situation to obtain additional details,” BD spokesman Troy Kirkpatrick told The...
    Administrator Hrag Bekerian felt confident, he said, that they were taking the right precautions at Gem Transitional Care Center before the coronavirus struck. The four-star-rated nursing home on South Fair Oaks Avenue in Pasadena had closed its doors to visitors a week before the state’s guidance. Managers held frequent training sessions, screened all entrants and ramped up hand-washing checks. “We believe we were well-prepared,” said Bekerian, 31. Eye of the Storm Southern California Nursing Homes during the Coronavirus Pandemic Latest installments in a continuing series Sunday, Part One:  What do Southern California nursing homes hard hit by COVID-related deaths have in common? We spoke with experts, nursing home administrators and advocates to find out. Tuesday, Part Two: A tale of two...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — New information from a leading infectious disease specialist that every parent of kids in college needs to hear. CBS 2’s Chris Tye reports on why classes and dorms aren’t the problem but the new problem age group is 18 to 29. While colleges and universities are doing a good job regulating, those in the youthful prime are testing limits, exposing risk and are proving a trick to tame. “It’s so hard to know what to do with colleges. Because young adults are causing outbreaks and having increase rates of spread in young adults everywhere in the country, regardless of whether they’re in class,” said Doctor Emily Landon. In person, hybrid or remote learning, it doesn’t really matter....
    Evangelina Gonzalez survived the coronavirus. But she found herself lonely and confused inside her nursing home. The 98-year-old, who has dementia, had fallen a couple of times at Monterey Palms Health Care Center in the Coachella Valley, her son said. After contracting the virus last spring, she was placed in an isolation wing for six weeks. “I’ll try to call her and she’s just like, ‘Where are you, where are you? I’m hungry, I’m thirsty, I’m in pain,’” said Gustavo “Sky” Gonzalez of Cathedral City. “It’s heartbreaking.”   Even before the pandemic, Monterey Palms seemed to have high turnover and other staffing issues, he said. “They were so short that administrators were manning the front desk, helping with maintenance and...
    A couple dozen protesters gathered outside of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office in Manhattan to demand he take responsibility for the thousands of nursing home deaths during the height of the coronavirus. Protesters were spotted holding signs on Saturday that read, “Cuomo killed my mother!” “Cuomo To Seniors: Drop Dead,” and “Let families in now,” referring to demands that he allow families to visit loved ones in nursing homes after six months of being denied entrance. The Democrat has been criticized for issuing an order on March 25 that required some recovering coronavirus patients to be placed into nursing homes. So far, at least 6,400 New York residents died in nursing homes from complications with the coronavirus....
    Two dozen protesters gathered in front of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Manhattan office Saturday to demand he allow visits at nursing homes and take responsibility for loved ones who died there during the height of the city’s COVID-19 crisis. “Cuomo killed my mother!” and “Let families in now,” their posters read. Many people in New York nursing homes have been confined to their rooms, often alone, for the past half-year, the protesters said. Not seeing their family members has been tormenting on both sides. see also Relatives demand nursing home visits outside New York state senators office Dozens of people barred from visiting their aging parents in... “My mother lives at The Riverside [Riverside Premier Rehabilitation and Healing] for...
    ST. LOUIS (AP) — Another 306 people were sickened and 33 people died from the coronavirus last month in St. Louis County long-term care facilities, the county health department reported Friday. COVID-19 cases in nursing homes and other long-term care centers were up in August compared to July, when 256 new cases were reported. At least 33 people died in July as well. County health officials say most deaths and coronavirus cases occurred early in the pandemic before rules to stem the spread of the virus were fully implemented. At least 494 people in long-term care facilities have died from the virus since it first struck the area in March. In total, the county reported 2,320 cases in those centers...
    By TODD RICHMOND, Associated Press MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The Wisconsin Elections Commission shouldn't allow special voting deputies to enter nursing homes to help residents cast absentee ballots in November because the risk they could spread COVID-19 through the facilities is still too great, the commission's top administrator warned Thursday. State law allows local clerks to appoint deputies to enter nursing homes and help residents fill out absentee ballots. But the elderly appear to be the most susceptible to COVID-19. The elections commission in March banned deputies from entering facilities for the state's April presidential primary, following state and federal guidance that only essential workers be allowed to enter such facilities. The commission reaffirmed in June that no deputies should...
    By MARINA VILLENEUVE, Associated Press ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York is now allowing visitors to see loved ones at assisted living homes that are COVID-free for 14 days, up from 28 days under previous guidance. Family members and friends of residents at the state's nursing homes and assisted living homes have been urging the state for months to ease its March 13 ban on most visits. The state's guidance has allowed visits for medically necessary or end-of life services. New York announced July 10 that it would begin allowing restricted visits at nursing homes and assisted living facilities that haven't had a COVID-19 case among residents or staffers for 28 days. Visits are limited to outdoor areas with weather...
    Sweden’s positive coronavirus cases dropped after the country carried out a record number of COVID-19 tests recently, Reuters reported Tuesday, citing Swedish health officials. The country saw only 1,300 positive cases out of 120,000 tests last week, representing a 1.2% positive rate, Sweden’s health agency said Tuesday, according to the Reuters report. The low number of cases is the lowest Sweden has seen since the pandemic, which originated in China, first emerged in Europe, the report noted. “The purpose of our approach is for people themselves to understand the need to follow recommendations and guidelines that exist,” Swedish Health Agency Director-General Johan Carlson said at a news conference, according to Reuters. (RELATED: Coronavirus Not Spreading Among Students, Swedish And German...
              This is part four in an eight-part series on the Ohio Public Health Advisory System (OPHAS) – the color-coded system designed to give a county-by-county threat assessment of COVID spread in Ohio. This article will further examine indicator three (of seven) in the OPHAS: the proportion of cases not in congregate settings. The aged, particularly those with more than two serious existing conditions, are most at risk for suffering the worst – even fatal – effects of COVID. Yet, for the sake of OPHAS, cases outside congregate settings are supposed to indicate the active community spread of COVID. Indicator three is triggered if the proportion of cases that are not in a congregate...
    Labor Day weekend beachgoers in New York were met with a message about Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s coronavirus response. “THE GOV KILLED NANA,” a banner flown over New York City and Long Island read on Saturday. “The people were going crazy,” one beachgoer told the New York Post. “[Cuomo] is nothing but a liar, condescending and miserable person. His carelessness caused the death of a lot of people unnecessarily.” The Democratic governor has been criticized for issuing a March 25 order that required some recovering coronavirus patients to be placed into nursing homes. So far, at least 6,447 New York residents died in nursing homes due to the coronavirus. Among the governor’s most vocal critics of the...
    LAKEWOOD, New Jersey (WABC) -- A New Jersey-based company is finding a way to help people suffering from COVID-19 across the country with the largest collection of plasma in one drive."Streamline Verify" has been holding plasma drives at its corporate office in Lakewood since last month.After seven drives, that plasma will be helping people nationwide.The company already ran antibody testing, so collecting those antibodies to help in the fight against the coronavirus was the logical next step."We were able to build up a large network of individuals with high antibodies which really evolved into where we are today," said Joe Stefansky, Streamline Verify CEO. "We're going into uncertain times, the hospitals are stockpiling with plasma, we are a part of...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- It's the first weekend of the semester at NYU and the school says more than 20 students have already been suspended for violating its safety and health rules.The school announced the suspensions in a tweet. More than 20 NYU students have been suspended so far. Please dont be the next. Avoid parties and bars. Wear a mask. Keep your distance. https://t.co/UpeJRIQDk6 pic.twitter.com/mG5h5DMxev— New York University (@nyuniversity) September 5, 2020MORE: NYU plans for in-person classes in the fallIn subsequent messages, the school says it has received reports and videos of large crowds of young people gathering in Washington Square Park Saturday night, with some people not wearing masks or distancing.NYU leadership is investigating.Earlier this week, NYU's...
    New York beachgoers were greeted with what appears to be a grim anti-Cuomo banner in the sky Saturday. “THE GOV KILLED NANA,” read the banner carried on a propeller plane that flew across New York City and Long Island beaches, according to accounts on social media. Gov. Andrew Cuomo has been widely criticized for his handling of the state-regulated nursing homes, where at least 6,447 New Yorkers died during the health crisis. One Rockaway beachgoer told The Post the plane flew by around 4 p.m. as observers stopped to take pictures and applauded the message. “The people were going crazy,” the beachgoer said. “[Cuomo] is nothing but a liar, condescending and miserable person. His carelessness caused the death of a...
    New York beachgoers were greeted with what appears to be a grim anti-Cuomo banner in the sky Saturday. “THE GOV KILLED NANA,” read the banner carried on a propeller plane that flew across New York City and Long Island beaches, according to accounts on social media. Gov. Andrew Cuomo has been widely criticized for his handling of the state-regulated nursing homes, where at least 6,447 New Yorkers died during the health crisis. One Rockaway beachgoer told The Post the plane flew by around 4 p.m. as observers stopped to take pictures and applauded the message. “The people were going crazy,” the beachgoer said. “[Cuomo] is nothing but a liar, condescending and miserable person. His carelessness caused the death of a...
    ELMHURST, Queens (WABC) -- There was good reason to celebrate at a hospital in Queens.After a nearly six-month battle with coronavirus, one patient at Elmhurst Hospital got to go home.Jose Guerrero got coronavirus back in March.However, the medical staff at Elmhurst Hospital never gave up on him.They gave him quite a send-off, loudly cheering him on as he escorted out of the hospital.He is one of the lucky ones.Hundreds of nursing homes still aren't allowing visitation amid coronavirus pandemicEMBED More News Videos Dan Krauth reports nearly five months after the coronavirus pandemic started, thousands of families in New York still haven't been able to visit their loved homes in nursing homes MORE CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 COVERAGEHow coronavirus changed the New York...
    FBI agents and state authorities raided a pair of Pennsylvania nursing homes — including one where at least 82 residents died of COVID-19 — amid allegations of criminal neglect, according to reports. Officials seized evidence from the Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center and the Mt. Lebanon Rehabilitation and Wellness Center, both of which are located outside Pittsburgh, reports said. Photos posted online by CBS Pittsburgh show investigators wearing safety masks and disposable blue gloves as they loaded cardboard file boxes into the back of a van on Thursday. The raids were conducted pursuant to court-ordered federal search warrants, Pittsburgh US Attorney Scott Brady said in a prepared statement. Brighton Rehab is the scene of Pennsylvania’s worst coronavirus outbreak in...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG, Pa. (KDKA) — Pennsylvania Department of Health Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine released updated coronavirus guidance for nursing home facilities on Thursday. The guidance applies to those people who are asymptomatic. In counties with low levels of the virus, staffers should be tested every four weeks. In moderate activity areas, staffers should to be tested once week. In counties with substantial activity levels, staffers should be tested twice a week. As for actual residents, Dr. Levine says they should be tested once a week, if they’ve had outside contact in the past 14 days, but only in the “moderate” and “substantial” activity areas. Today DOH updated #COVID19 screening, testing and visitation guidance in skilled nursing facilities....
    FBI agents have raided two nursing homes in Pennsylvania, including one facility that was the source of the worst coronavirus outbreak in the state.   The FBI on Thursday executed search warrants at Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center in Beaver County, as well as its Mt Lebanon site in Allegheny County, the Justice Department confirmed.   U.S. Attorney Scott Brady said agents from the FBI, the office of inspector general for Health and Human Services, the IRS Criminal Investigation unit and the state attorney general's office were on the scene.  FBI agents executed search warrants at Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center - which had the worst coronavirus outbreak in the state - on Thursday  Agents from several federal and state...
    President Trump fired back at NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday in the latest round of insults between the pair, claiming it was because of his 'incompetence' that '11,000' died from coronavirus in nursing homes.  Since the start of the pandemic, the two have traded barbs over their respective responses to the crisis - Trump's on a federal level and Cuomo's in New York, once the epicenter.  Now, they are fighting over Trump's threat to cut funding to states and cities that have 'lost control' amid a swell of riots, looting and - specifically in New York - crime and homelessness.  Cuomo, on Wednesday, said of the president: 'He can't have enough bodyguards to walk through New York City. Forget...
    President Donald Trump blasted New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo over the number of people who died from coronavirus in New York nursing homes. In a Thursday morning tweet, Trump said Cuomo "has the worst record on death and China Virus." He added that "11,000 people alone died in Nursing Homes because of his incompetence!" Cuomo has been under scrutiny for an order he issued back in March that required nursing homes to accept coronavirus patients who were medically stable without testing them. The order was reversed, but thousands of people living in nursing homes died from the coronavirus. The governor has claimed that the deaths were caused by infected staff members who spread the virus to residents. He has dismissed...
    President TrumpDonald John TrumpKenosha mayor lifts curfew citing several 'peaceful' nights MSNBC's Joy Reid concedes 'framing' of Muslim comments 'didn't work' Conway says even more 'hidden, undercover' Trump voters will help him win reelection MORE on Thursday criticized New York Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoTrump calls for review to cut funding to cities with 'lawless' protests Overnight Health Care: Shifting CDC testing guidance sparks backlash | Democrats offer lower price tag for COVID-19 aid but stalemate persists | Trump administration to purchase 150 million rapid COVID-19 tests Cuomo says NY colleges with 100 coronavirus cases must 'go remote' for two weeks MORE (D) for his record on handling the coronavirus, calling the governor incompetent and blaming him for thousands of deaths...
    Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Health Department has no shame — not over its deadly March 25 order forcing nursing homes to admit COVID-positive patients, and not in stonewalling anyone looking to learn how many lives that mandate cost. The latest is its laughable excuse for dodging a Freedom of Information Law request from the Empire Center, filed early last month. It sought the number of nursing-home residents who died of the coronavirus after being transferred to hospitals, numbers the state stopped releasing in May. The department response this week: It can’t comply until at least Nov. 5, “because a diligent search for relevant documents is still being conducted.” see also Top nursing home association begs Cuomo, Zucker to relax...
    This is going to be a very difficult process but eventually a solution will be seen because the numbers are going down. Marco Carrasco is the President of the Florida Association of Nursing Homes. In addition, he was involved in the task force appointed by Governor DeSantis to reopen these centers. The buildings have to be 14 days without Covid, neither employees nor residents. And if there is a new positive case during those 14 days, the visits are canceled. All visitors must wear personal protective equipment, including a mask, there can only be two visitors at a time and visits from minors will not be allowed.
    The Michigan Nursing Homes COVID-19 Preparedness Task Force released its recommendations to protect long-term care residents, a demographic disproportionately affected by COVID-19 mortalities. “I want to thank the members of the task force for their collaboration and support for the state’s ongoing focus on protecting Michigan’s most vulnerable populations,” Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said in a statement. “I will carefully review these recommendations and continue to work closely with the task force and our partners to strengthen policies to protect nursing home residents, staff, and their families.” The 28 recommendations cover four strategy areas: placement, resource availability, staffing and quality of life. The recommendations suggest continuing to use the regional hub program to house COVID-19 patients, but...
    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Tuesday that he will lift the state’s ban on visiting nursing homes that has cut off vulnerable seniors from family since mid-March over fears of spreading the new coronavirus. With his voice cracking at times, he wondered aloud if his actions might have contributed to suffering in his state as he made his announcement during a round table in Jacksonville. “Part of having a healthy society is understanding that human beings seek affection,” DeSantis said. “Many of the folks understand that they have loved ones who are in the last stage of their life. They’re not demanding a medical miracle. They’re not having unrealistic expectations. They just would like to be...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) —  In a report released Tuesday, a task force urged Gov. Gretchen Whitmer that Michigan should modify a system in which nursing home residents infected with the coronavirus can be treated and isolated in those facilities, and to take steps to improve life for all long-term care residents amid the pandemic. The 20-member group was created by the governor to prepare for a potential second surge of COVID-19 after deaths and cases spiked in the spring. Nursing home residents account for 2,088, or 31%, of the state’s 6,767 confirmed or probable deaths related to the virus. Of the 28 recommendations, nearly half involve ways to better the quality of life inside homes that have been forced to...
    PHOTO VIA ADOBE IMAGESFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Tuesday he will allow visitors into nursing homes and assisted living facilities, nearly six months after the state blocked visitation during the first wave of coronavirus infections. DeSantis said during an appearance in Jacksonville that he would sign an executive order lifting the ban on visitors, while also allowing “essential” caregivers to touch long-term care residents. Two elder-care advocacy groups criticized the move to reopen facilities, asking why it is coming now and questioning a decision not to mandate that visitors be tested before entering facilities. The executive order will take effect immediately, said Agency for Health Care Administration Secretary Mary Mayhew, who headed a DeSantis-appointed task force that came up with...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal official said Tuesday the government plans to ship rapid coronavirus tests to assisted living facilities, moving to fill a testing gap for older adults who don’t need the constant attention of a nursing home. Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Health Adm. Brett Giroir said assisted living facilities will be followed by senior day care centers and home health agencies in getting the tests. The tests will come from a supply of 150 million ordered from test maker Abbott Laboratories. Abbott’s rapid test, the size of a credit card, is the first that doesn’t require specialty computer equipment to process. It delivers results in about 15 minutes and is priced at $5, significantly lower...
    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Tuesday that he will lift the state’s ban on visiting nursing homes that has cut off vulnerable seniors from family since mid-March over fears of spreading the new coronavirus. DeSantis said he would lift the ban in an executive order later Tuesday, following recommendations from a nursing home task force that has met in recent weeks. The task force recommends that homes allow family members to visit their loved ones no more than two at a time, and that they wear protective gear including masks. Facilities would need to go 14 days without any new cases of COVID-19 among staff or residents to allow the visits. More than half of Florida...
    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Tuesday that he would lift the state’s ban on nursing home visits that has been in place since the start of the coronavirus pandemic in March. DeSantis said he would lift the ban later Tuesday following recommendations from a nursing home task force that has met in recent weeks. The task force recommends families visit their loved ones two at a time and wear protective equipment including masks. Facilities would be required to go 14 days without any new COVID-19 cases among staff or residents to allow visits. FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE JUNE, THIS STATE ANNOUNCED LESS THAN 2,000 CORONAVIRUS CASES  Around 62 percent of Florida facilities have not had a new coronavirus case...
    Florida Governor Ron DeSantis announced Tuesday that he will lift the state ban on visiting nursing homes that has separated vulnerable seniors from the family since mid-March for fear of spreading the new coronavirus. DeSantis said he would lift the ban in an executive order, following the recommendations of a nursing home task force that has met in recent weeks. The task force recommends that households allow family members to visit loved ones no more than two people at a time, and that they wear protective gear, including masks. Facilities would have to go 14 days with no new COVID-19 cases among staff or residents to allow visits. More than half of Florida facilities –...
    Dear Moneyist, I wanted to ask you a moral or ethical question concerning COVID-19. Here’s my situation: my sister-in-law who currently lives with me has tested positive for COVID as of yesterday. I have not been tested within the past 30 days. I work in a long-term care facility/nursing home, in Pennsylvania as a certified nursing assistant. I informed my employer of the positive case in my home. I volunteered to stay home 14 days because I don’t want to risk infection to my residents I take care of, or fellow employees. My employer says they want me to wear a mask and face shield and come to work, and make sure other employees are wearing a mask properly...
    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Tuesday that he will lift the state’s ban on visiting nursing homes that has cut off vulnerable seniors from family since mid-March over fears of spreading the new coronavirus. DeSantis said he would lift the ban in an executive order later Tuesday, following recommendations from a nursing home task force that has met in recent weeks. The task force recommends that homes allow family members to visit their loved ones no more than two at a time, and that they wear protective gear including masks. Facilities would need to go 14 days without any new cases of COVID-19 among staff or residents to allow the visits. More than half of Florida...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — While the wildfires have raged in Northern California, the coronavirus outbreak, reopenings and school classes starting has continued. To keep you updated on the COVID-19 news you need to know here’s a roundup of the top coronavirus and reopening-related stories. Good News — Neighbors Helping Neighbors Better Together: Fremont Teenage Siblings Launch ‘Cards 4 COVID Heroes’ FREMONT — Fremont teenage siblings Prabhleen and Mantej Lamba have experienced the growing uncertainty of everyday life as the COVID-19 pandemic has taken a grip on the San Francisco Bay Area. What has impacted them the most, they say, has been the sacrifices of medical workers around the world who are risking their physical and mental health on the...
    The New York State Health Department announced an emergency rule Monday that requires increased testing to distinguish whether individuals are infected or die from the coronavirus or influenza as the flu season approaches. The new edict, which goes into effect immediately, requires coroners and funeral directors as well as hospital and nursing homes to test for both illnesses. Nursing homes are currently required to test all staffers for COVID-19 weekly, a rule operators want relaxed. “While the human toll this virus has taken on New Yorkers is immeasurable, these regulations will ensure we have the most accurate death data possible as we continue to manage COVID-19 while preparing for flu season,” Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said in a...
    The New York State Health Department announced an emergency rule Monday that requires increased testing to distinguish whether individuals are infected or die from the coronavirus or influenza as the flu season approaches. The new edict, which goes into effect immediately, requires coroners and funeral directors as well as hospital and nursing homes to test for both illnesses. Nursing homes are currently required to test all staffers for COVID-19 weekly, a rule operators want relaxed. “While the human toll this virus has taken on New Yorkers is immeasurable, these regulations will ensure we have the most accurate death data possible as we continue to manage COVID-19 while preparing for flu season,” Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said in a statement...
    (CBS Local) — There are now over 6 million cases of COVID-19 in the United States of America and 183,000 people have died. There are many horrific tragedies that have occurred over the past six months, but one of the worst is how coronavirus decimated many nursing homes across the country. According to Elaine M. Ryan, AARP Vice President of State Advocacy and Strategy Integration in the Government Affairs Department, more than 70,000 people who were residents or staff from nursing homes have died from COVID-19. On top of that, another 375,000 residents or staff from nursing homes have been infected by the virus. “The tragedy of loss of life, especially among older Americans and especially those living in nursing homes...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — One of the country’s top COVID-19 experts was in Minnesota Sunday — Dr. Deborah Birx, who is on the White House’s COVID-19 Task Force. She was in St. Paul meeting with Gov. Tim Walz and other state health officials. After having a roundtable discussion with the governor, health commissioner Jan Malcolm and several others, she met with the press to discuss what she thinks is going well in states’ responses to this pandemic and what needs improvement. Minnesota was the 23rd stop in Birx’s countrywide tour. Birx said Minnesota’s biggest strength in comprehensive testing we have for our nursing homes and long term care facilities, protecting the most vulnerable. She said there needs to be improvement in...
    ONEONTA, New York (WABC) -- SUNY Oneonta will stop all on-campus learning for two weeks after a cluster of about 100 students have tested positive for coronavirus.Officials say five students have been suspended for holding parties.After several large parties were held, 20 students were found to test positive for COVID. A medical team was deployed to test all students on Friday, and another 71 cases were found.That makes up for 3% of all students and faculty on campus. As a result, school officials decided to close campus for instruction to manage the potential spread.School officials say more suspensions are likely as investigation into off-campus parties continues.RELATED | How New York City and Tri-State area universities, colleges are reopening for fall...
    HARTFORD, Conn. (CBSNewYork) — Two nursing homes in Connecticut have been fined for failing to test employees for the coronavirus. Avery Nursing Home in Hartford was cited. The state says the facility did not test 37 employees, including nurses, in July and August. Hamden Rehabilitation and Health Care Center in Hamden was fined for not testing 39 workers. Both facilities were fined $1,140 by the Connecticut Department of Public Health. Weekly COVID-19 testing is required in Connecticut nursing homes. You can get the latest news, sports and weather on our brand new CBS New York app. Download here.
    ALBANY — One of New York’s top nursing home associations wants Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his Health Commissioner Howard Zucker to change two strict policies: a mandate requiring staffers get tested once a week and another governing visitation standards. “We respectfully request the State to revise its current policies concerning nursing home and assisted living COVID-19 staff testing and resident visitation restrictions to safeguard the health and well-being of our residents and ensure the continued provision of necessary long term care services throughout New York,” wrote Steve Hanse, CEO of the New York State Healthcare Facilities Association, in a letter Friday. The group which represents 425 nursing homes and adult care facilities housing 70,000 individuals — argues a two-day-old Centers...
    ALBANY — One of New York’s top nursing home associations wants Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his Health Commissioner Howard Zucker to change two strict policies: a mandate requiring staffers get tested once a week and another governing visitation standards. “We respectfully request the State to revise its current policies concerning nursing home and assisted living COVID-19 staff testing and resident visitation restrictions to safeguard the health and well-being of our residents and ensure the continued provision of necessary long term care services throughout New York,” wrote Steve Hanse, CEO of the New York State Healthcare Facilities Association, in a letter Friday. The group which represents 425 nursing homes and adult care facilities housing 70,000 individuals — argues a two-day-old Centers...
    Three US Senators are calling for a federal investigation after two nursing homes administered hydroxychloroquine to residents infected with the novel coronavirus without gaining proper approval first.   In a letter sent on Thursday to the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Sens. Bob Casey (D-PA), Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Ron Wyden (D-OR) said the incidents occurred in facilities in Pennsylvania and Texas. They are demanding authorities determine the extent to which the medication was used on residents without their or their families' consent.  The senators also sent letters to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid asking for information on what efforts were made to guarantee residents weren't exposed...
    The United States Department of Justice has requested data from New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo after he issued an executive order that may have resulted in the deaths of nursing home residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. The DOJ announced this week that it is requesting information from governors of states that issued orders which “may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents.”  Other states being probed are New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Michigan. In March, before the outbreak peaked and projections were still daunting, Cuomo issued the order to send recovering COVID-19 patients from hospitals into nursing homes to free up beds for potential new COVID patients. Earlier story - COVID-19: Families Want Independent Investigation Of...
    SAN ANTONIO – Making a friend during the pandemic might not be as complicated as one may imagine. A local teen is proving you can make a meaningful connection without screens. In a time when most are still taking precautions at home and nursing homes can’t have any visitors, making a pen pal seems like the perfect solution. Joven Tapiador launched a community service project through Summer of Service, or SOS, San Antonio’s Make it Happen initiative that will benefit two local nursing homes. SOS is an organization that educates youth in San Antonio through service-learning and opportunities to study abroad. Tapiador’s letter project idea came about during quarantine. “I got inspired by my grandmother,” Tapiador said. “She...
    LIVINGSTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Federal authorities are now trying to collect evidence to see if New York and New Jersey contributed to the high number of deaths in public long-term care facilities by allowing COVID-19 patients to be sent there for treatment. One woman says private facilities should be looked at, too. There’s not a day that goes by that Tara Clevens does not think about her mother, Sandria Leifer, who died from COVID-19 five months ago at 76 years old. “She was my best friend. I lost my best friend,” Clevens said. Clevens says her mom was living at Atrium Post Acute Care in Livingston, a private long-term care facility that she believes was taking in COVID-19 patients from...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Gov. Andrew Cuomo is criticizing the Justice Department for requesting COVID-19 data from public nursing homes in four Democratic-led states. The letters — sent to New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan — are seeking information on whether the states violated federal law by ordering nursing homes to accept recovering coronavirus patients from hospitals. RELATED STORY: DOJ Requests Data From New York, New Jersey About COVID-19 Orders That May Have Resulted In Nursing Home Deaths Prosecutors say they’re trying to determine if the orders resulted in thousands of deaths. On Thursday, Cuomo called the move a political one. “There are about 14 states in the country that followed the same CDC guidance. The letter only went...
    Dozens of people barred from visiting their aging parents in a state-run nursing home rallied Thursday to demand that officials grant them access to their cooped-up kin. The group gathered outside the Westchester office of state Sen. Pete Harckham (D-Peekskill), whose district covers the New York State Veterans’ Home in Montrose. Carol Rydell of Westbury, LI, said she and her husband travel to the nursing home every weekend for what officials call a “window visit” with her 94-year-old mom, Ilse Weinberger, through the facility’s glass front door. “She hates the window visits and to me, a window visit is like looking at an animal in the zoo,” Rydell said. “She just deserves more and I’m petrified that she is going...
    Dozens of people barred from visiting their aging parents in a state-run nursing home rallied Thursday to demand that officials grant them access to their cooped-up kin. The group gathered outside the Westchester office of state Sen. Pete Harckham (D-Peekskill), whose district covers the New York State Veterans’ Home in Montrose. Carol Rydell of Westbury, LI, said she and her husband travel to the nursing home every weekend for what officials call a “window visit” with her 94-year-old mom, Ilse Weinberger, through the facility’s glass front door. “She hates the window visits and to me, a window visit is like looking at an animal in the zoo,” Rydell said. “She just deserves more and I’m petrified that she is going...
    U.S. Justice Department officials said they are trying to determine whether COVID-19 policies of New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo that “may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents." Federal authorities said they hadn't launched an investigation. Rather, they said, they're conducting preliminary inquiries into COVID policies in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Michigan while considering a possible civil rights investigation under a federal law that protects the rights of residents in state-run nursing homes, among others. Letters sent to the four governors gives each two weeks to supply information on the number of public nursing home residents, employees, staff, guests and visitors in their state who tested positive...
    President Donald Trump is expected to announce Thursday that his administration has struck a deal with Abbott Laboratories in order to secure 150 million rapid coronavirus tests, Politico reports. The 150 million rapid coronavirus tests will cost American taxpayers a total of $750 million — $5 per test — and will be deployed into nursing homes and other high-risk communities, as well as schools, according to Politico.  Abbott Laboratories said it won U.S. marketing authorization for a COVID-19 portable antigen test that can deliver results within 15 minutes and will sell for $5 https://t.co/IdRf3HGCzG pic.twitter.com/T6hYKpwxNM — Reuters (@Reuters) August 27, 2020 While slightly less reliable than the traditional COVID-19 test, rapid-developing coronavirus tests can give reliable results in just...
    The Department of Justice is asking for data from states that required nursing homes to admit COVID-19 patients that the department alleges "may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of elderly nursing home residents." The Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division is also considering whether to begin investigations under the federal "Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act."  In New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan, the states' governors issued orders preventing nursing homes from refusing COVID-19 patients entry, despite the vulnerable populations in nursing homes.  But New York has pointed out that their actions did not violate the federal government's own guidelines.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox A March 13 memo from the Centers for Disease...
              The Civil Right Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has requested information about COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes from the state of Michigan. The request, made on Wednesday, will help the department determine if it will open up an investigation under the federal Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act, which will identify if the state orders requiring coronavirus-positive patients to be admitted to nursing homes were responsible for the deaths of residents. “Protecting the rights of some of society’s most vulnerable members, including elderly nursing home residents, is one of our country’s most important obligations,” said Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Division Eric Dreiband said in a statement. “We must...
    Dozens of nursing homes evacuated their residents as Hurricane Laura bore down Wednesday, but many others with a choice just stayed put, concluding the risk of breaking their coronavirus lockdowns could be more deadly than the storm. “It is always best if you can remain in an environment that is familiar,” said Charles Solomon, who runs The Resort at Texas City, a nursing home with 79 residents near the Galveston Bay shoreline. The facility suffered a COVID-19 outbreak that infected 55 residents, killing 17, but now is free of cases. Because it is outside the evacuation zone and has never flooded in the past, the staff decided it would be best to stay in place, particularly given fears of reintroducing...
    The U.S. Department of Justice has asked four Democrat-run states — Michigan, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania —  about their policies on nursing homes and coronavirus, seeking to determine whether elderly patients died as a result. The Associated Press reported Wednesday: The Justice Department on Wednesday sent letters to the governors of New York and three other Democratic-led states, seeking data on whether they violated federal law by ordering public nursing homes to accept recovering COVID-19 patients from hospitals — actions that have been criticized for potentially fueling the spread of the virus. Prosecutors said the fact-finding letters also sent to New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Michigan were aimed at determining whether the orders “may have resulted in the deaths of...