2020-09-24@11:07:41 GMT
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    Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins, also know as white dolphins or pink dolphins, have returned to parts of the Pearl River Delta in Hong Kong — and their resurgence is being attributed to the coronavirus pandemic. Researchers say the number of these dolphins off Hong Kong has jumped 30% because of a pause in ferry traffic in recent months.  The dolphins moved back into parts of the river they once avoided due to the ferries that would carry passengers from Hong Kong and Macau, marine scientist Lindsay Porter of the University of St. Andrews said, according to Reuters.  Ferry traffic was suspended in March, which also allowed scientists an opportunity to study how underwater noise affected their behavior, Porter said. The population...
    The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in South Dakota was a “superspreading event” that may be linked to almost 20 percent of new coronavirus cases across the country last month, according to a new study. The paper, by researchers from San Diego State University’s Center for Health Economics & Policy Studies and the IZA Institute of Labor Economics, tracked cellphone data at the gathering attended by more than 460,000 mostly-maskless motorcycle enthusiasts amid the COVID-19 pandemic. At one point, 90s pop-rock band Smash Mouth played a concert to thousands of attendees, with the frontman saying, “F–k that COVID shit!” Researchers said that the event not only led to rising infections in the surrounding region, but also in the places across the nation...
    The Burmese Roof Turtle (Batagur trivittata) is, without a doubt, the most smiling reptile on the planet but its state of conservation was critically endangered. In fact, it was believed to be extinct until 2002 when it was rediscovered but thankfully conservation efforts have successfully increased the turtle population in 2020 to 1,000 captive animals; some of them have been released into the wild. After a large conservation project in Myanmar, which means that the species is a little further from total extinction. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Turtle Survival Alliance have published a series of photos with this new population of turtles, which is also collected by Zootaxa magazine.
    Bradley Cortright September 3, 2020 0 Comments The White House is pushing back on a report that said officials were considering pursuing a herd-immunity strategy. During a press conference on Thursday, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany shot down reports that White House officials considered that theory, “The herd immunity, so-called, theory was something made up in the fanciful minds of the media. That was never something that was ever considered here at the White House.” “Here at the White House, what we’ve done is race to get a safe and effective vaccine in record time,” she continued. She went on to argue that White House officials “talk about therapeutics” for the virus.  McEnany also noted that there are 270 clinical...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — EDITOR’S NOTE: On Aug. 11, 1965, an uprising began in Los Angeles after the drunken driving arrest of a young Black man by a white California Highway Patrol officer. It was focused in the segregated Black neighborhood of Watts, where violence exploded in response to systemic problems residents said they faced, including abusive police, high unemployment and poor health care. Watts has never fully recovered from fires that leveled hundreds of buildings or the violence that killed 34 people — two-thirds of whom were shot by police or National Guard troops. Fifty-five years after what became known as the Watts riots began, The Associated Press is making an original text story and some photographs available....
    A woman convicted of a brutal murder was released 19 years into what was supposed to be a minimum 84-year sentence because the prison was concerned about the potential spread of COVID-19, KOVR-TV reported. Teresa Williams, 44, was convicted in 2001 of the 1998 murder of 23-year-old John Ruska. Williams carjacked Ruska, put him in the trunk of his own car, shot him in the abdomen, drove 750 miles with him in the trunk, then tied him up in a hotel room where he suffered for hours alone before dying. Neither police nor prosecutors could ever figure out why she committed the crime, particularly why she subjected Ruska to such extreme suffering when she could've just taken his car...
    The Chinese government is taking draconian measures to slash birth rates among Uighurs and other minorities as part of a sweeping campaign to curb its Muslim population, even as it encourages some of the country’s Han majority to have more children. While individual women have spoken out before about forced birth control, the practice is far more widespread and systematic than previously known, according to an AP investigation based on government statistics, state documents and interviews with 30 ex-detainees, family members and a former detention camp instructor. The campaign over the past four years in the far west region of Xinjiang is leading to what some experts are calling a form of “demographic genocide.” The state regularly subjects minority women...
    NONWHITES and Hispanics now make up a majority of people under age 16, and white people have highest average age. US Census data released Thursday revealed the changing demographics. 2 People are seen walking through Times Square in New York City on August 22, 2019. US Census Data shows that the nonwhite and Hispanic population under the age of 16 is a majorityCredit: AP:Associated Press Data from the Census Bureau revealed that for the first time, nonwhites and Hispanics comprise a majority of people in the US under the age of 16, the Associated Press reported. The number of non-Hispanic white has dropped over 16,600 in the last decade, as the number of deaths surpassed the number of births, Census...
    ORLANDO, Florida – For the generation of Americans who are not yet old enough to drive, the demographic future has arrived. For the first time, African-Americans and Hispanics were the majority among the population under the age of 16 in 2019, an expected demographic change that will increase in the coming decades, according to figures published Thursday by the United States Census Bureau. “This is going to be a diversified century for the United States, and it’s starting with this younger generation,” said William Frey of The Brookings Institution. At the same time, the number of non-Hispanic whites has declined in the past decade as deaths outnumbered births in this demographic aging, according to population estimates from the Census...
    For the generation of Americans who are not yet old enough to drive, the demographic future has arrived. For the first time, people of color and Hispanics were the majority among the under-16 population in 2019, an expected demographic shift that will increase in the coming decades, according to figures released by the United States Census Bureau on Thursday. “This is going to be a diversified century for the United States, and it’s beginning with this younger generation,” said William Frey of The Brookings Institution. At the same time, the number of non-Hispanic banks has declined in the past decade as deaths outnumbered births in this demographic aging, according to population estimates from the Census Bureau. In 2019, just...
    The collapse of the Rapa Nui society on Easter Island in the South Pacific Ocean may have been triggered by changes in the Earth's climate 500 years ago. The Rapa Nui people inhabited the remote island, about 2,300 miles from the coast of Chile, from the middle of the first millennium AD.  The arrival of European explorers in 1722 led to a rapid decline of the population, brought on by murder, bloody conflict and the brutal slave trade.  However, Chilean scientists say there is evidence that the collapse of the indigenous population was already underway prior to the arrival of Dutch and Spanish settlers.    Climate change including droughts and resulting falls in the island's carrying capacity and food supply led...
    An Ohio state senator was fired from his other job as an emergency room doctor after he asked a black health expert if the “colored population” is more likely to contract the coronavirus because of poor handing washing, according to a report. Sen. Stephen Huffman was sacked from Tennessee company TeamHealth which has a chain of hospitals in the state, NBC News reported. “Dr. Huffman’s comments are wholly inconsistent with our values and commitment to creating a tolerant and diverse workplace,” a company spokesman said in a statement, according to the outlet. “TeamHealth has terminated Dr. Huffman’s employment.” Huffman made the controversial comments to the Senate Health committee Tuesday during a debate over whether racism is a public health crisis....
    A Republican lawmaker from Ohio is being called on to step down after an “unintentionally awkward” question he asked about black people and hand-washing landed him in hot water earlier this week. Ohio state Sen. Stephen Huffman posed a question during a Senate Health Committee hearing Tuesday in which he asked why African-Americans have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus. "I understand African-Americans have a higher incidence of chronic conditions and that makes them more susceptible to death from COVID. But why does it not make them more susceptible just to get COVID?" Huffman, a practicing physician, asked. "Could it just be that African Americans or the colored population do not wash their hands as well as other groups? Or wear a mask?...
    Republican Ohio Sen. Steven Huffman asked on Tuesday if the “colored population” was more likely to get coronavirus because they “don’t wash their hands as well.” Huffman asked the questions at a Senate hearing on Tuesday which sought to determine whether racism was a public health crisis. (RELATED: ‘I Called For Help And This Is The Help That I Get’: Father Speaks Out After Claiming Son Was Shot For Pointing Pellet Gun At Officers) Executive Director of the Ohio Commission on Minority Health Angela Dawson gave a statement outlining why the pandemic would affect communities with a preexisting health disparity.  “But why does it not make them more susceptible to just get COVID?” Huffman asked. “Could it just be that...
    The fact that Black Americans have been hit especially hard by the coronavirus pandemic can be attributed to both economic disparities and health care disparities. Even with the gains of the Affordable Care Act of 2010, a.k.a. Obamacare, millions of Black Americans continue to be uninsured or underinsured. But when Ohio State Sen. Steve Huffman was debating whether or not racism should be declared a public health crisis, the far-right Republican replied that perhaps “the colored population” was being hit so hard by COVID-19 because they don’t wash their hands enough. At an Ohio Senate Health Committee hearing this week, Huffman said, “I understand African-Americans have a higher incidence of chronic conditions, and it makes them more susceptible to death...
    Republican Ohio State Senator Steve Huffman had an interesting take on how racism and the coronavirus pandemic intersect. He believes that a certain community’s hygiene may play a large part as to why more people of color have been impacted by the respiratory disease. READ MORE: Cities make deep COVID-19 budget cuts but not to police departments “My point as I understand African Americans have a higher incidence of chronic conditions and it makes them more susceptible to death from COVID,” Huffman said in a public hearing, “But why it doesn’t make them more susceptible to just get COVID. Could it just be that African Americans or the colored population do not wash their hands as well as other groups...
    State Sen. Steve Huffman (R-Ohio) is under fire after questioning whether the “colored population” was hit harder by the coronavirus due to less stringent handwashing. The senator asked the question during a meeting in the Ohio’s Senate Health Committee. Huffman, who is also an emergency room physician, wanted to know why the coronavirus is disproportionately hitting the Black community. “Could it just be that African Americans or the colored population do not wash their hands as well as other groups or wear a mask or do not socially distance themselves? That could be the explanation of the higher incidence.” In response, Ohio Commission on Minority Health Director Angela Dawson told Huffman “that is not the opinion of leading...