2020-09-29@00:30:41 GMT
68 results - (0.000 seconds)

preexisting conditions:

    Pennsylvania 17th congressional district Republican candidate Sean Parnell slammed Rep. Conor Lamb (D-PA) on Monday who he claimed reeked of “desperation” the day after their congressional debate. Lamb claimed that Parnell said during Saturday’s debate that he is “unprepared” to discuss whether Congress should take action to protect patients with preexisting conditions if the Supreme Court strikes down the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Lamb wrote on Sunday: DOJ lawyers will argue in Nov. that the ACA should be overturned, including protections for preexisting conditions. Last night, @SeanParnellUSA admitted he agrees & is unprepared to talk about it. Because neither he nor the President have any plan to deal with the consequences. DOJ lawyers will argue in Nov. that the ACA should...
    VIDEO3:1103:11Sen. Ted Cruz on the Supreme Court and the future of health careSquawk Box Republicans will protect Americans who have preexisting conditions, even if the Supreme Court rules the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional, Sen. Ted Cruz told CNBC on Monday. The conservative-majority high court is set to hear the latest legal challenge to the law, also known as Obamacare, on Nov. 10. The closely watched case has taken on heightened attention during the ongoing fight to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.  Many Democrats, including presidential nominee Joe Biden, are trying to paint President Donald Trump's nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court as damaging to the future of Obamacare. Barrett...
    Guy on the left is saying nothing, lady on the right is trying to save health care. Former external affairs official for ICE and television anchor Paul Junge is running to unseat Michigan’s newest House representative, Democrat Elissa Slotkin. Slotkin was one of the many Democratic and progressive candidates to shake the world during the 2018 blue wave elections. Slotkin won Michigan’s 8th district, one that had gone comfortably to both Mitt Romney and Donald Trump in 2012 and 2016, respectively. On Sunday morning, the two candidates had a debate on local TV station WDIV Channel 4. One of the biggest issues facing Americans and something that both sides of the aisle’s constituents are worried about is the continued rising cost of health care...
            by Fred Lucas  President Donald Trump signed an executive order Thursday aimed at protecting Americans with preexisting health conditions, after delivering remarks on his administration’s health care vision in Charlotte, North Carolina. “Under the America First health care plan, we will ensure the highest standard of care anywhere in the world, cutting edge treatments, state-of- the-art medicines, groundbreaking cures, and true health security for you and your loved ones,” Trump told his audience in Charlotte. The president also talked about actions his administration has taken to reduce the cost of prescriptions, increasing accountability for veterans’ health care, expanding insurance options, and allowing terminally ill patients the opportunity to try lifesaving drugs that have not gotten...
              Live from Virginia Friday morning on The John Fredericks Show –  weekdays on WNTW AM 820/ FM 92.7 – Richmond, WJFN FM 100.5 – Central Virginia, WMPH AM 1010 / FM 100.1 / FM 96.9 (7-9 PM) Hampton Roads, WBRG AM 1050 / FM 105.1 – Lynchburg/Roanoke and Weekdays 6-10 am and 24/7 Stream –  host Fredericks welcomed the Administrator for Medicare and Medicaid Service, Seema Verma to the show to discuss President Trump’s healthcare executive order and it’s focus on transparency and pre-existing conditions. Fredericks: Joining us now from The White House. So good to have her on is Seema Verma. She is the administrator for Medicare and Medicaid services, and she’s been there and...
    Democrats are speaking out against President Donald Trumps order guaranteeing that people with preexisting conditions will receive access to affordable healthcare because they believe their "lies about the Affordable Care Act," Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said Friday.  "That promise was made in the Affordable Care Act but for 30 million Americans priced out of the individual market by the excesses and infirmities of the Affordable Care Act it doesnt solve their problem," Azar said on Fox News "Americas Newsroom." For example, he said, a 55-year-old couple in Missouri who makes $70,000 a year will pay $30,000 in premiums and have a $12,000 deductible.  "Thats not coverage of your preexisting conditions," said Azar. "It is a meaningless insurance...
    For at least four years President Donald Trump has been promising the American people a health care plan. He famously sat for the “60 Minutes” cameras just days after the 2016 election and said, “this is what I do I do a good job I mean I know how to do this stuff.” He promised his new health care plan would protect the millions of Americans with pre-existing conditions and would be “great health care for much less money.” After years of promises Trump on Thursday unveiled his “health care plan.” He’s calling it his “health care vision” because it’s not an actual plan, it’s a wish list. And it’s a mere executive order. “The actual policies,” Stat News reports, “however, are...
    President Trump outlined his long-awaited health care plan on Thursday, signing a series of executive orders he said are aimed at protecting Americans with preexisting conditions, ending surprise billing and introducing more affordable public options. The move comes as the Trump administration tries to overturn Obamacare in the Supreme Court after getting rid of the key enforcement tool of the law, the individual mandate, when Congress eliminated the penalty for not having insurance. Abolishing it could mean 20 million Americans lose their health insurance, though the case will not be heard until after the election. “We’re delivering better care with more choice at a much lower cost and working to ensure Americans have access to the care they need,” Trump...
    A Republican U.S. Senate candidate from Virginia, who lost his leg in the Iraq war, is pushing back against claims that his criticism of ObamaCare means he opposes protecting health care coverage for people with preexisting conditions. In his campaign against incumbent Democratic Virginia Sen. Mark Warner, Dr. Daniel Gade has called the health care law a “bad bill” that “shifts power from insurers to the government.” Warner’s campaign has noted that ObamaCare, the nickname for the Affordable Care Act or simply the ACA, contains provisions that safeguard health insurance coverage for people with preexisting conditions and argued that opposing it is akin to opposing those protections. FILE - In this Aug. 21, 2020, file photo, Republican Daniel Gade,...
    We're doing this again. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is almost certainly doomed with the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Unless John Roberts and Neil Gorsuch are ready to buck conservatives this time around and find a way to split the baby—strike down the individual mandate but preserve the rest of the law—it's probably over. Which would mean millions of people would lose their coverage entirely, and millions more could find it priced out of their reach. Those are the people with preexisting conditions, well over 100 million of them. It's likely there will be millions more of them on the other side of the coronavirus pandemic. More than 6 million Americans have had the virus, and it's...
    ObamaCare "is not affordable health care," Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told "Special Report" Thursday after President Trump signed a series of executive orders aimed at protecting Americans with preexisting conditions while the administration seeks to overturn the 2010 Affordable Care Act at the Supreme Court. "Let's be clear about the status quo," Azar told host Bret Baier. "Right now, under this glorified Obamacare that many want to talk about -- that they say protects people with preexisting conditions, a family of two aged 55 in Missouri making $70,000 a year will spend $30,000 a year on premiums and $12,000 in deductibles. I am sorry, that is not .. protection against preexisting conditions. That is not affordable health care. That doesn't solve their...
    President Donald Trump vowed Thursday to protect the ability for Americans to buy health insurance, even if they had pre-existing health conditions. The president outlined the three pillars of his plan: more choice, reduced costs, and better care for Americans. The president said he would develop plans for 60 percent less, opening up short-term insurance plans that could be short term customized plans, and even make insurance premiums tax-deductible. He noted that the coronavirus pandemic increased the numbers of American patients using the option of telehealth, especially after his administration expanded coverage for telehealth appointments. “Through these and other reforms we are putting American patients back in charge and we’re putting them first,” Trump said. Another part of his plan...
    President Donald Trump has put his vows to protect preexisting conditions on paper with an executive order Thursday, announcing his "America First Healthcare Plan" in North Carolina. "The historic action I am taking today includes the first-ever executive order to affirm it is the official policy of the United States government to protect patients with preexisting conditions, so were making that official," Trump said, announcing his vision for heathcare as his adminstration fell short of repealing and replacing Obamacare in his first term. "Our opponents, the Democrats, like to constantly talk about" healthcare, Trump added, "now we have it affirmed, this is affirmed, signed and done, so we can put that to rest." The order covers a range of issues, including...
    By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and JILL COLVIN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump plans to sign an executive order on preexisting medical conditions Thursday, amid a global pandemic and growing uncertainty about the future of protections guaranteed by the Obama-era health law his administration is still trying to overturn. In a visit to swing state North Carolina, the president will sketch out what aides call a “vision” for quality health care at affordable prices, with lower prescription drug costs, more consumer choice and greater transparency. Aside from protecting people with preexisting conditions, he'll sign another executive order to try to end surprise medical bills. But while the Trump administration has made some progress on its health care goals, the...
    President Donald Trump on Thursday laid out his vision for his "America First" health care plan and signed an executive order aimed at protecting people with preexisting conditions. In the swing state of North Carolina, Trump touted his plan as increasing health security, expanding affordable insurance choices and lowering prescription drug costs. Cartoons on President Donald TrumpView All 946 Images"As we restore America to full strength, the first health care plan will be a core part of our national renewal," Trump said. The executive order, he said, would "affirm it is the official policy of the United States government to protect patients with preexisting conditions." "So we're making that official," Trump said. "We're putting it down on a...
    President Trump on Thursday outlined his health care "vision," which he had pledged to release two months ago. The president said he will sign an executive order that lays out that vision, but the executive order has no legislative power.  His vision is called the "America First Health Care Plan." The president said the three pillars of his vision are "more choice" for health care options, "lower costs for families and seniors" and "better care" for American patients.  "Today I will lay out my vision for a health care system that puts patients first, families first and perhaps most importantly for all of us, America first," the president said in North Carolina. "Under the America First health care plan, we...
    President Trump touted a new healthcare reform plan Thursday in the swing state of North Carolina, but what he laid out consisted mostly of executive orders that would lack the force of law. Nor did he lay out a comprehensive proposal for legislation. “Under the America First healthcare plan, we will ensure the highest standard of care anywhere in the world … and true health security for you and your loved ones, and we will do it rapidly, and it's in very good order,” Trump said. With the election just over a month away, Trump has not laid out a legislative plan to replace Obamacare. At the same time, his administration has sought to have the healthcare...
    CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- During a Charlotte, N.C. campaign rally on Thursday, President Donald Trump announced an executive order on preexisting medical conditions, amid a global pandemic and growing uncertainty about the future of protections guaranteed by the Obama-era health law his administration is still trying to overturn."Under the America First Healthcare Plan, we will ensure the highest standard of care anywhere in the world, cutting edge treatment, state-of-the-art medicine and ground-breaking cures and true health security for you and your loved ones," Trump said. "We will do it rapidly, and it's in very good order and some of it has already been implemented."The president sketched out what aides called a "vision" for quality health care at affordable prices, with lower...
    The executive order holds no legal weight and would be moot if Trump successfully gets Obamacare struck down by the Supreme Court. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar on Thursday announced that Donald Trump will sign an executive order declaring that it is the "the policy of the United States" that people with preexisting conditions will be protected. However, Azar admitted on a call before Trump's announcement that the order holds no legal weight. As the Daily Beast's Sam Stein reported, Azar said the executive order would have no affect if the Supreme Court strikes down Obamacare and said it is merely a "defined statement of U.S. policy." The Affordable...
    WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump plans to sign an executive order on preexisting medical conditions Thursday, amid a global pandemic and growing uncertainty about the future of protections guaranteed by the Obama-era health law his administration is still trying to overturn. In a visit to swing state North Carolina, the president will sketch out what aides call a “vision” for quality health care at affordable prices, with lower prescription drug costs, more consumer choice and greater transparency. Aside from protecting people with preexisting conditions, he'll sign another executive order to try to end surprise medical bills. But while the Trump administration has made some progress on its health care goals, the sweeping changes he promised as a candidate in...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump plans to sign an executive order on preexisting medical conditions Thursday, amid a global pandemic and growing uncertainty about the future of protections guaranteed by the Obama-era health law his administration is still trying to overturn. In a visit to swing state North Carolina, the president will sketch out what aides call a “vision” for quality health care at affordable prices, with lower prescription drug costs, more consumer choice and greater transparency. Aside from protecting people with preexisting conditions, he’ll sign another executive order to try to end surprise medical bills. But while the Trump administration has made some progress on its health care goals, the sweeping changes he promised as a candidate...
    U.S. President Donald Trump speaks while hosting an event commemorating the repatriation of Native American remains and artifacts from Finland in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, September 17, 2020.Kevin Lamarque | Reuters President Donald Trump will sign a series of executive orders aimed at protecting people with preexisting conditions and preventing surprise medical bills, senior administration officials said Thursday. Trump is expected to discuss the executive orders, which are part of his "America First" health-care plan, during his visit to Charlotte, North Carolina later Thursday, the officials said. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told reporters on a conference call that one of the orders would declare it the policy of the United States to "provide...
    President Trump is expected Thursday to put forth a healthcare plan that draws on executive actions on price transparency and rebate reform, with a pledge to protect Americans who suffer preexisting conditions. Trump will discuss health plan in Charlotte, North Carolina. These orders "were rolled out individually and piecemeal," Indiana GOP Sen. Mike Braun told the Washington Examiner Wednesday. "This is going to be a more coordinated approach, so we have a better response to well, 'If you don't have Obamacare, what is your plan?'" "You're going to see uniformity among all Republicans that it does cover preexisting conditions," he added. The effort comes as Democrats charge Americans will lose health coverage if the Trump administration's court challenge to...
    President Trump is preparing to issue a series of executive actions on health care "in the weeks ahead" as his administration fights to repeal the Affordable Care Act in the Supreme Court, Vice President Mike Pence said. During an interview with "CBS Evening News" on Tuesday, Pence defended the White House-backed legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act, the landmark health law also known as ObamaCare. The lawsuit has drawn increased scrutiny following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a stalwart of the court's liberal bloc, on Friday. Trump and other Republican leaders indicated after Ginsburg's death that they intended to move forward with filling the court's vacancy. GINSBURG DEATH CASTS FRESH UNCERTAINTY ON THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT'S FUTURE Senate Majority...
    WASHINGTON — President Trump will take executive action “in the weeks ahead” to protect Americans with pre-existing conditions as his administration tries to kill ObamaCare in the Supreme Court, Vice President Mike Pence said Tuesday. In an interview with CBS Evening News, Pence was asked about a brewing legal battle which could see tens of millions of Americans lose access to health care as the government argues that a mandate requiring people have health care is unconstitutional. The looming fight over the Affordable Care Act has come into even sharper view after the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, clearing a path for Trump to select a third nominee and create the first conservative majority since the 1960s. “We’ve...
    WASHINGTON — President Trump will take executive action “in the weeks ahead” to protect Americans with pre-existing conditions as his administration tries to kill ObamaCare in the Supreme Court, Vice President Mike Pence said Tuesday. In an interview with CBS Evening News, Pence was asked about a brewing legal battle which could see tens of millions of Americans lose access to health care as the government argues that a mandate requiring people have health care is unconstitutional. The looming fight over the Affordable Care Act has come into even sharper view after the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, clearing a path for Trump to select a third nominee and create the first conservative majority since the 1960s. “We’ve long...
    A new clip of Norah O’Donnell’s interview with Vice President Mike Pence focuses on President Donald Trump’s recent pledges about a health care plan. The CBS Evening News anchor noted how the Supreme Court is going to take up the Affordable Care Act and asked if they want a justice who will strike it down. “We’ve long believed that the individual mandate at the center of Obamacare was unconstitutional,” Pence said, “but make no mistake about it. The president’s also been very clear that we’re going to make sure that any American with preexisting conditions continue to have coverage.” NEW: @VP Mike Pence tells @NorahODonnell that “in the days ahead” Pres. Trump could use “executive branch authority” to take...
    WASHINGTON – With COVID-19 the newest preexisting condition, the Obama-era health law that protects Americans from insurance discrimination is more fragile following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. A week after the presidential election, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments on an effort backed by President Donald Trump to strike down the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, in its entirety. Former President Barack Obama's landmark law bars insurers from turning away people with health problems, or charging them more. With Ginsburg on the court, there seemed to be little chance the lawsuit championed by conservative-led states could succeed, given that she and four other justices had twice previously voted to uphold important parts of the health law....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — With COVID-19 the newest preexisting condition, the Obama-era health law that protects Americans from insurance discrimination is more fragile following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. A week after the presidential election, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments on an effort backed by President Donald Trump to strike down the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, in its entirety. Former President Barack Obama’s landmark law bars insurers from turning away people with health problems, or charging them more. With Ginsburg on the court, there seemed to be little chance the lawsuit championed by conservative-led states could succeed, given that she and four other justices had twice previously voted to uphold important parts of the health...
    The Mississippi Supreme Court ruled Friday that state law does not qualify all people with pre-existing health conditions for absentee voting, the Associated Press reported.  The ruling reversed a decision earlier this month by Hinds County Chancery Judge Denise Owens, with the majority of the state's Supreme Court justices arguing that Owens interpreted earlier changes to state law too broadly.  “Having a preexisting condition that puts a voter at a higher risk does not automatically create a temporary disability for absentee-voting purposes,” the justices wrote in the majority opinion. This decision diverges from a ruling from a federal judge in neighboring Louisiana on Wednesday, who said that Louisiana must allow mail-in voting for people with conditions that the U.S. Centers...
    They are distractions, to be sure, but there are a whole lot of them. President Trump and his campaign are, well, pushing the envelope of acceptability in a general election campaign. And it’s happening at a time when the president is on a media blitz--Axios, Woodward, “Fox & Friends,” ABC--and making his case on substantive issues. Maybe there’s just more journalistic focus on the Trump campaign, or maybe Joe Biden’s more conventional campaign mainly tends to color between the lines. And it’s entirely possible that most voters don’t care. But Trump keeps setting these mini-fires that are fouling the political atmosphere. Take, for instance, a recent Trump retweet from the account Conservative Girl (“pro-Trump” and “anti-feminism”) that includes the hashtag...
    By MARYCLAIRE DALE, Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) — If President Donald Trump agreed to a Pennsylvania town hall to sway undecided voters, his exchange with a literature professor born with a chronic disease lost him at least one vote in the battleground state. Ellesia Blaque voted reluctantly for Hillary Clinton in 2016, and dislikes Sen. Kamala Harris’s record as a prosecutor. She hoped that Trump would allay her fear of losing insurance coverage over her preexisting condition. Instead, the president interrupted her — she politely asked to finish — and then, she thought, politicized the question to attack “Obamacare.” “I decided that even though I’m dissatisfied, mainly with Kamala Harris, I’m going to vote for Joe Biden,” said Blaque, 57,...
    PHILADELPHIA – If President Donald Trump agreed to a Pennsylvania town hall to sway undecided voters, his exchange with a literature professor born with a chronic disease lost him at least one vote in the battleground state. Ellesia Blaque voted reluctantly for Hillary Clinton in 2016, and dislikes Sen. Kamala Harris’s record as a prosecutor. She hoped that Trump would allay her fear of losing insurance coverage over her preexisting condition. Instead, the president interrupted her — she politely asked to finish — and then, she thought, politicized the question to attack “Obamacare.” “I decided that even though I’m dissatisfied, mainly with Kamala Harris, I’m going to vote for Joe Biden,” said Blaque, 57, who lives near Reading...
    (CNN)In June 2019, President Donald Trump promised that he was on the verge of unveiling a "phenomenal" health care bill."Yeah, well, we'll be announcing that in about two months. Maybe less," Trump told ABC's George Stephanopoulos at the time, adding: "You're going have the greatest health care that anybody's ever had."Fast-forward 15 months to Wednesday night, when Stephanopoulos and Trump were together again, this time at a town hall in Philadelphia. And this moment, when Trump was asked by a woman named Alycee Block, an assistant professor in Philadelphia who was born with an inflammatory disease, about his fight to get rid of a provision in the Affordable Care Act that blocks insurers from discriminating based on preexisting conditions. Watch.This...
    When Donald Trump gets on a roll with the lying, like he did Tuesday night in the town hall on ABC News, well, it's like CNN reported Daniel Dale says: "just a firehose of lying, again." The well of lies is just so, so deep. And so transparent. Like this one: a "new healthcare [plan]. […] I have it all ready."   xThis is must-see and must-share.@GStephanopoulos stops Donald Trump cold - right in the middle of his lies - and fact checks him in real time on everything from his bogus healthcare plan to his attempts to get rid of preexisting condition protections.pic.twitter.com/wrxoapFVNN— TrumpsTaxes (@TrumpsTaxes) September 16, 2020 Stephanopoulos did do a good job there, as did Prof. Alycee Block,...
    One woman said she's voting for Biden because President Trump dodged her questions during ABC News' town hall in Philadelphia on Tuesday.  Ellesia Blaque is an English professor at Kutztown University and questioned the president Tuesday night about health care and what his administration can do to offer those with preexisting conditions, such as herself, who are paying over $5,000 in copays for a condition she has had since birth. "Mr. President, I was born with a disease called sarcoidosis, and from the day I was born, I was considered uninsurable. That disease started in my skin, moved to my eyes, into my optic nerves, and when I went to graduate school, into my brain." Blaque asked Trump, "Should preexisting conditions,...
    A woman cut off President Donald Trump during Tuesday night’s ABC News town hall after the president tried to interrupt her part way through her question on preexisting conditions. The woman, who has a preexisting condition herself, wanted to know what Trump was doing to protect health care services for people like her even as he seeks to dismantle Obamacare in the Supreme Court. Trump assured her that he had no plans to get rid of coverage for preexisting conditions. And that’s the last time Trump will ever interrupt this woman.pic.twitter.com/vyFbjJE3mQ — Brian Tyler Cohen (@briantylercohen) September 16, 2020 “Should [coverage for] preexisting conditions, which Obamacare brought to fruition, be removed —” she says before being interrupted. “No,” Trump...
    President Donald Trump faced tough questioning from a voter regarding his efforts to repeal Obamacare at an ABC News town hall on Tuesday night. Ellesia Blaque, a PhD and professor who voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016, spoke about her lifelong struggle with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory disease, as well as the extent of her healthcare costs. She asked: “Should preexisting conditions, which Obamacare brought to fruition, be removed –” “No,” Trump jumped in. “Please stop and let me finish my question, sir,” Blaque said. “Should that be removed, within a 36 to 72-hour period, without my medication, I will be dead. And I want to know what it is that you’re going to do assure that people like me...
    By SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Democratic candidate for Missouri governor Nicole Galloway said Wednesday that she wants to pass a state law protecting health insurance for people with preexisting conditions. The proposal is part of the state auditor's health care plan if voters elect her over Republican Gov. Mike Parson on Nov. 3. She also pledged to enact Medicaid expansion as called for by voters, attempt to bring down health care and prescription drug costs, and promote more primary care clinics in rural and predominantly Black areas. “Missouri families need healthcare coverage that isn’t eating up more-and-more of their paycheck; and they need access to quality care close to home,” Galloway said in a statement. “As...
    In the 30-second campaign spot, Bacon touts his support for "affordable healthcare and protecting preexisting conditions." He cites his late sister as his motivation to "fight like hell to ensure every Nebraska family has affordable health care." Don Bacon campaign ad screenshot   Bacon did not just vote for a bill that would have repealed Obamacare; he also said of his support for it at the time: "I've changed my vote, from 'yes' to 'hell, yes.' " The bill, which narrowly passed in the House, died in the Senate. "71% of Americans like their healthcare, and we should seek to improve it, not destroy it," Bacon tweeted on Tuesday. "My opponent would take away the healthcare that most Americans want...
    Yes, Kayleigh McEnany's speech was that vapid. On the Republican National Convention (RNC) stage Wednesday night, official mouth-of-Trump Kayleigh McEnany stood up to talk about how much Donald Trump cares about people with preexisting conditions. She has a compelling story, carrying the BRCA II genetic mutation that put her chances of having breast cancer at 84%, and a family history in which breast cancer was rampant. So she chose to have a preventative mastectomy in May 2018. "As I came out of anesthesia, one of the first calls I received was from Ivanka Trump," she gushed. "Days later, as I recovered, my phone rang. It was President Trump, calling to check on me." That, she says, is enough evidence for her...
    The lies and distortions at the 2020 Republican National Convention have been numerous, including claims that President Donald Trump had a first-rate response to the coronavirus and claims that he has tried to protect health coverage for Americans with preexisting health conditions. In response to this dishonesty Wednesday night, CNN’s Daniel Dale launched into a brilliant stream of fact-check of the mendacious event. Dale told his colleague, Anderson Cooper: “There is just so much dishonestly and inaccuracy at this convention. It’s hard for me to know where to start. It’s not just big things like this broad revisionism on the response to the pandemic — it’s little inaccuracies, carelessness.” CNN’s Daniel Dale fact checks speakers from the third night of...
    White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany scolded CNN’s David Axelrod after the liberal network’s senior political analyst criticized her emotional Republican National Convention speech, saying her story was used as a “leap to an assertion” that President Trump is fighting to protect people with preexisting conditions. On Wednesday night, McEnany shared the deeply personal story about her diagnosis with the BRCAII genetic mutation ‒ a mutation that put her chances of breast cancer at 84 percent ‒ which prompted her to get a preventive double mastectomy in 2018. KAYLEIGH MCENANY SHARES STORY OF HER MASTECTOMY IN CONVENTION SPEECH, RECALLS TRUMP’S SUPPORT Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany scolded CNN’s David Axelrod after the liberal network’s senior political analyst criticized her emotional Republican National Convention speech. “I was scared. The night before...
    White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany tapes her speech for the third day the Republican National Convention from the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020. Susan Walsh/AP Photos For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.Wednesday night, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany went on prime time TV during the third night of the Republican National Convention and told what might be one of the biggest lies of the evening. President Trump, she said, “stands by Americans with preexisting conditions.” To prove it, McEnany told a personal story. “Tonight, I’m here to share with you how he supported me—both as a new mom and as an American with a preexisting condition,”...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence and fellow Republicans pressed a distorted case Wednesday that President Donald Trump took over a moribund economy from Barack Obama and supercharged it. That’s not what happened. Speakers at the Republican National Convention also hailed Trump for protecting the health insurance of people with preexisting illness, flipping reality on its head as his administration tries to overturn the law that guarantees those protections. A look at how some of the the rhetoric from the convention’s first night compares with the facts: PENCE, in prepared remarks: “Four years ago, we inherited … an economy struggling to break out of the slowest recovery since the Great Depression. Despite unrelenting opposition and obstruction from the swamp...
    In reality, Trump has tried multiple times to repeal or sabotage the Affordable Care Act — former President Barack Obama's signature health care law that prohibited insurance companies from denying insurance coverage to or charging more for people with preexisting conditions, among other things. The Trump administration has joined a lawsuit from Republican attorneys general seeking to strike down the ACA as unconstitutional — a move that could cost millions their health insurance and could leave those with preexisting conditions facing higher insurance costs or the inability to obtain insurance altogether. That challenge is currently before the Supreme Court. In 2017, when Trump had both a Republican House and Senate, he tried to repeal Obamacare and replace it with "something terrific."...
    Perdue, a first-term senator facing a tough reelection race in November against Democrat Jon Ossoff, voted in 2017 to repeal Obamacare, including its mandate the people with preexisting conditions must be covered by insurance policies. In January 2019, Perdue said that "of course" he wanted a GOP-spearheaded lawsuit aimed at striking down the health care law to succeed. In April 2019, he joined other Republicans in supporting the "Protect Act," a bill he claimed "protects Americans with preexisting conditions." Shortly after it was introduced, analysts noted that, while its sponsors say that the act "guarantees coverage for pre-existing conditions and prohibits insurance companies from excluding coverage of treatments for a patient's pre-existing condition," other provisions of the Protect Act...
    Andrew Harnik/AP For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.In the middle of a pandemic, in an election year, President Trump is realizing that Americans highly value the health care system he’s tried so hard to dismantle. Last week, Trump suggested that he would sign an executive order requiring insurers to cover preexisting conditions—a key provision of the Affordable Care Act, which has been the law of the land for more than 10 years. Asked at a Monday press conference why he felt the need to reinforce an existing law, Trump all but admitted to the ploy for good PR. “Just a double safety net,” he said, “and just to let people know that...
    A look at Trump's claim during a news conference Friday evening in Bedminster, New Jersey: TRUMP: "Over the next two weeks, I'll be pursuing a major executive order requiring health insurance companies to cover all preexisting conditions for all customers. That's a big thing. I've always been very strongly in favor. ... This has never been done before." THE FACTS: No executive order is needed to protect people with preexisting medical conditions because Obamacare already does that and it's the law of the land. If Trump persuades the Supreme Court to overturn the Affordable Care Act as unconstitutional, it's unclear what degree of protection an executive order would offer in place of the law. The Obama health law states that...
    President Donald Trump signed four orders aimed at providing coronavirus relief through executive action on Saturday as Congress is currently gridlocked on the issue. Trump’s first order seeks to establish a payroll tax cut holiday from August 1, 2020 through the end of the year. The second directs the Department of Housing and Urban Development and other federal agencies to prohibit evictions. The third order establishes a $400-per-week addition to the paycheck protection program for workers. The fourth will provide relief for Americans’ student loans. “It will be rapidly distributed,” Trump said. Pres says he’s ordering a payroll tax holiday for those making less than $100K/year. Would be in effect from August 1 to the end of 2020. Says if...
    President Donald Trump said on Friday he would be working over the next couple of weeks on an executive order to require health insurers to cover preexisting conditions. Insurance companies were prohibited from denying coverage to people with preexisting conditions under the Affordable Care Act passed under former President Barack Obama, known as Obamacare, which the Trump administration has tried to scrap. "Over the next two weeks Ill be pursuing a major executive order requiring health insurance companies to cover all preexisting conditions for all customers," Trump said at a news conference at his golf property in Bedminster, New Jersey. The Republican president, who is trailing Democratic candidate Joe Biden in several polls ahead of the Nov. 3, gave no...
    Democrats pounced on President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoe Arpaio loses bid for his old position as sheriff Trump brushes off view that Russia denigrating Biden: 'Nobody's been tougher on Russia than I have' Trump tees up executive orders on economy but won't sign yet MORE’s announcement Friday that he may sign an executive order to require that health insurers cover all preexisting conditions, claiming that the president is trying to run under accomplishments from the Obama administration. Critical lawmakers were quick to point out that such protections for preexisting conditions were already implemented under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Obama administration’s signature health care law that Trump and Republicans are currently trying to repeal.  “This already exists. It’s called the Affordable...
    By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and HOPE YEN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is teasing the possibility of executive action to require health insurance companies to cover preexisting medical conditions, something that he says “has never been done before.” It’s been done before. People with such medical problems have health insurance protections because of President Barack Obama’s health care law, which Trump is trying to dismantle. A look at Trump's claim during a news conference Friday evening in Bedminster, New Jersey: TRUMP: “Over the next two weeks, I’ll be pursuing a major executive order requiring health insurance companies to cover all preexisting conditions for all customers. That’s a big thing. I’ve always been very strongly in favor. ... This...
    U.S. President Barack Obama speaks while meeting with President-elect Donald Trump (L) following a meeting in the Oval Office November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) President Donald Trump announced Friday that he is planning to present a new executive order that will require health insurance companies to cover patients with preexisting conditions. It turns out, however, that such a law already exists, thanks to his predecessor, as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which is widely known as “Obamacare.” The president made the announcement at a last-minute press conference held at his company’s golf course in Bedminster, NJ, as reported by Business Insider. “Over the next two weeks I’ll be...
    During a press conference at President Donald Trump's New Jersey resort Friday evening, a reporter attempted to corner the president while suggesting attendees who weren't wearing masks were breaking the law under the state's COVID-19 restrictions. But the president drew cheers and applause when he assured the journalist that the invited guests were well within compliance, explaining, "It's a peaceful protest." What are the details? President Trump announced with a few hours notice that he would hold a press conference at his private club in Bedminster, so several members filed in to witness the event. As it was wrapping up, a reporter addressed the president, saying, "You said that the pandemic is disappearing, but...
    At no time did the ad disclose that King previously worked as the deputy state and data director of the Georgia Republican Party, a field director for former Rep. Karen Handel's campaign, and as a consultant for Gov. Kemp's 2018 campaign, according to her LinkedIn page. King currently appears as a panelist for the "Georgia Gang" show on a local Fox affiliate in Atlanta. A biography for the station describes her as "a rising star in the world of conservative politics in Georgia" who works as "a consultant to the GOP for community engagement, public affairs, and diversity initiatives." The Perdue campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Earlier this year, Sen. Martha McSally (R-AZ) was...
    The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar. Read excerpts from the interview below.   Clemons: Is there anything you can tell us about where we're at on the vaccination front? Azar: What we're doing with Warp Speed and the president just commissioned us to say I've heard the pharma company timelines and they're all so drawn out. I used to be at a pharmaceutical company. I know these timelines. I know why they're drawn out. And he said, “Can we with the full might of the U.S. government and all of the financial resources that we can bring to bear. Can we compress those timelines while still delivering safety and efficacy on vaccines?”...
    We're here again. Some of the most vulnerable Senate Republicans are trying to convince voters that they didn't do exactly what they did: vote to end protections for people with preexisting conditions in the Affordable Care Act (ACA). They did it when they had no viable plan to replace it, and seemingly no real intention of getting it done. Yet, here're three of them trying to sell that lie to voters, again. In ads and in interviews, these three—Steve Daines of Montana, Cory Gardner of Colorado, and Martha McSally in Arizona—all talk about how hard they'll work to protect people's health care. Just like in 2018, they're all talking about protecting people with preexisting conditions, and just like 2018, they’re lying through...
    That has not happened and the once unpopular law now enjoys far higher approval ratings than Trump does. Given the new landscape, top 2020 House hopefuls appear to have changed their tactics. The National Republican Congressional Campaign — the campaign arm of the House Republicans — has identified 21 "Young Guns" candidates who are, according to the committee, the challengers that "represent the most competitive congressional seats in the 2020 election cycle." A review of the issue pages on the Young Guns' campaign sites found just one candidate — Montana State Auditor Matt Rosendale — openly campaigning on Obamacare repeal. "We can’t give up on repealing and replacing Obamacare," his site urges. "In June 2019, Montana’s three health insurance companies...
    Shefali Luthra July 1, 2020 3:24PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Kaiser Health News. Trailing Democratic challenger Mark Kelly in one of the country's most hotly contested Senate races, Arizona Sen. Martha McSally is seeking to tie herself to an issue with across-the-aisle appeal: insurance protections for people with preexisting health conditions. "Of course I will always protect those with preexisting conditions. Always," the Republican said in a TV ad released June 22. : The ad comes in response to criticisms by Kelly, who has highlighted McSally's votes to undo the Affordable Care Act. That, he argued, would leave Americans with medical conditions vulnerable to higher-priced insurance. The Arizona Senate race has attracted national attention and is considered...
    Shefali Luthra June 30, 2020 11:30AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Kaiser Health News. Trailing Democratic challenger Mark Kelly in one of the country's most hotly contested Senate races, Arizona Sen. Martha McSally is seeking to tie herself to an issue with across-the-aisle appeal: insurance protections for people with preexisting health conditions. "Of course I will always protect those with preexisting conditions. Always," the Republican said in a TV ad released June 22. : The ad comes in response to criticisms by Kelly, who has highlighted McSally's votes to undo the Affordable Care Act. That, he argued, would leave Americans with medical conditions vulnerable to higher-priced insurance. The Arizona Senate race has attracted national attention and is considered...
    Late on Thursday, the Trump administration filed its brief with the Supreme Court to challenge the Affordable Care Act (ACA) when the court hears the case this fall. Just before the election. In a pandemic. And they took the protections provided in the law head-on, explicitly arguing that the provision that prevents insurance companies from discriminating against people with preexisting conditions must be tossed, along with the entirety of the law. The brief argues that because Congress essentially repealed the individual mandate requiring people to purchase insurance or pay a fine by zeroing out the amount of that fine, then the whole law is invalid. "The entire ACA thus must fall with the individual mandate," Solicitor General Noel Francisco wrote in...
    To address the rising cost of prescription drugs, the bill would empower Medicare to negotiate drug prices and then allow Americans on private insurance to share in the savings. The bill also provides incentives to expand Medicaid for states that have not done so. According to the sponsors of the bill, more than 2 million uninsured Americans could get health insurance through Medicaid if every state embraced the expansion allowed under the ACA. The legislation would also reverse efforts by the Trump administration to expand access to so-called "junk insurance" plans that are not required to protect people with preexisting conditions. The bill was introduced by Reps. Frank Pallone, Jr., chair of the Energy and Commerce Committee; Richard Neal, chair...