2020-09-27@00:40:54 GMT
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    BOSTON (AP) — A former college entrance exam administrator pleaded guilty Friday to taking bribes to help wealthy parents rig their kids' test scores as part of a college admissions bribery scheme. Niki Williams, 46, a former employee of the Houston Independent School District, is among about 40 people who have admitted to charges in the case that exposed a scheme to get undeserving teens into college with fake athletic credentials or manipulated test scores. DIANNE FEINSTEIN'S HUSBAND NAMED IN AUDIT OF 'UNFAIR' UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ADMISSIONS Prosecutors say Williams, who administered the college entrance exams at the public high school where she worked, took money from the admissions consultant at the center of the scheme in exchange for allowing...
    Documents released late Friday provided new details on how UC Berkeley handled what a recent state audit called an “inappropriate letter of support” from University of California Regent Richard Blum to get an applicant admitted despite the student’s “uncompetitive” ranking by admission readers. The redacted documents, released by the California State Auditor’s Office, showed that Blum sent the letter to current UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ. Blum told Christ he wanted to “express my support” for an “outstanding” applicant on the waitlist who “embodies all the qualities we look for in our students.” “Beyond college, I can see [the applicant] as a devoted alumnus who will greatly contribute to the CAL community,” Blum wrote. He asked Christ to give...
    BOSTON (AP) — A former college entrance exam administrator pleaded guilty Friday to taking bribes to help wealthy parents rig their kids' test scores as part of a college admissions bribery scheme. Niki Williams, 46, a former employee of the Houston Independent School District, is among about 40 people who have admitted to charges in the case that exposed a scheme to get undeserving teens into college with fake athletic credentials or manipulated test scores. Prosecutors say Williams, who administered the college entrance exams at the public high school where she worked, took money from the admissions consultant at the center of the scheme in exchange for allowing someone else to take exams in place of the children of Singer’s...
    California Sen. Dianne Feinstein's husband was among those listed in a University of California audit to discover unfair admissions practices. Richard Blum, the Democratic senator's husband, was responsible for a "particularly problematic" instance of someone promoting an underqualified student for admission, according to several reports. Blum, who is a member of the board of regents for the University of California system, wrote a letter to the chancellor at the University of California, Davis and advocated for the admission of a student who had been wait-listed and only had a 26% chance of being admitted based on merit alone. The student was granted admission, taking the place of a student with stronger academic credentials. Blum told the San Francisco...
    If you want to go to a highly selective university, whether for an undergraduate program, to get your master’s or to earn a law degree, then you need entrance exam scores that stand out. Unfortunately, these exams are not cheap. Enrolling to take the LSAT, for example, will run you $200, and prep courses are even more expensive. For instance, in-person and online tutoring options for the SAT exam can cost you upwards of $1,000! That’s a lot of cash. If you want great test scores on the necessary admissions exams without breaking the bank, take a look at this All-In-One Test Preparation Bundle which covers the six most popular standardized tests. Here’s a breakdown of what you can expect:...
    US Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s wealthy investment banker husband used his influence to help an under-qualified student get into the University of California, Berkeley, according to a new report. Richard Blum, a UC alum and regent since 2002, penned a letter to the school chancellor’s office on behalf of the unnamed student, who was waitlisted and had just a 26 percent chance of getting into the prestigious university, the San Jose Mercury News reported Thursday. Blum’s letter was forwarded to UC’s admissions office, which prioritized the student’s application over more qualified applicants, the outlet said. “It is therefore likely that the applicant whom the regent recommended would have been on a list that received priority admission from the waitlist,” an...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s husband, University of California Regent Richard Blum, was named Thursday by the state auditor’s office as one of the regents involved in admissions scandal where UC wrongly admitted dozens of wealthy, mostly white students as favors to well-connected people. Among those “inappropriately admitted” were a student whose family was friends with a member of the Board of Regents, the child of a major donor and an applicant who babysat for a colleague of a former admissions director, according to the report released Tuesday by the California State Auditor. In one case, a regent unidentified in the audit sent an “inappropriate letter of support” directly to the UC Berkeley chancellor on behalf of...
    Lori Loughlin will be serving out her prison sentence in a lap of luxury by incarceration standards when she begins her punishment for her role in the college admissions scandal. The “Fuller House” alum was handed a two-month term behind bars in August after she and husband fashion designer, Mossimo Giannulli, pleaded guilty to charges stemming from $500,000 payments to scam mastermind William “Rick” Singer to get their daughters, Olivia Jade and Isabella Giannulli, recruited onto University of Southern California's crew team. The two had never participated in the sport. Loughlin, 56, was granted a request to handpick where she wanted to serve out her sentence and elected to do her time at FCI Victorville, a California medium-security federal correctional institution and the same...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s husband, University of California Regent Richard Blum, was named Thursday by the state auditor’s office as one of the regents involved in admissions scandal where UC wrongly admitted dozens of wealthy, mostly white students as favors to well-connected people. Among those “inappropriately admitted” were a student whose family was friends with a member of the Board of Regents, the child of a major donor and an applicant who babysat for a colleague of a former admissions director, according to the report released Tuesday by the California State Auditor. In one case, a regent unidentified in the audit sent an “inappropriate letter of support” directly to the UC Berkeley chancellor on behalf...
    Senator Dianne Feinstein's investment banker husband has been identified as the University of California regent who wrote a letter that likely helped a 'less qualified' applicant gain admission to UC Berkeley. Richard Blum was named Thursday by the state auditor's office as one of the regents involved in admissions scandal where UC wrongly admitted dozens of wealthy, mostly white students as favors to well-connected people. Among those 'inappropriately admitted' were a student whose family was friends with a member of the Board of Regents, the child of a major donor and an applicant who babysat for a colleague of a former admissions director, according to the report released Tuesday by the California State Auditor. Blum was unapologetic in an interview...
    Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s husband has been named in connection with a University of California admissions audit that found wealthy and connected kids were given preference over more qualified applicants, according to local reports. The audit, released earlier this week, found that 64 students with ties to major donors, university leaders, or other people with influence got into four of the state’s top public universities – beating out peers who were more qualified academically or athletically between 2013 and 2019. And it singled out one case as “particularly problematic.” SLUG: ST/KENNEDY. DATE: March, 8, 2009 CREDIT: Katherine Frey / TWP. LOCATION: Washington, DC. SUMMARY: Ted Kennedy birthday celebration at the Kennedy Center CAPTION: Sen. Dianne Feinstein with her husband, Richard...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s husband, University of California Regent Richard Blum, was named Thursday by the state auditor’s office as one of the regents involved in an admissions scandal where UC wrongly admitted dozens of wealthy, mostly white students as favors to well-connected people. Among those “inappropriately admitted” were a student whose family was friends with a member of the Board of Regents, the child of a major donor and an applicant who babysat for a colleague of a former admissions director, according to the report released Tuesday by the California State Auditor. In one case, a regent unidentified in the audit sent an “inappropriate letter of support” directly to the UC Berkeley chancellor on behalf...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s husband, University of California Regent Richard Blum, was named Thursday by the state auditor's office as one of the regents involved in admissions scandal where UC wrongly admitted dozens of wealthy, mostly white students as favors to well-connected people. Among those “inappropriately admitted” were a student whose family was friends with a member of the Board of Regents, the child of a major donor and an applicant who babysat for a colleague of a former admissions director, according to the report released Tuesday by the California State Auditor. In one case, a regent unidentified in the audit sent an “inappropriate letter of support” directly to the UC Berkeley chancellor on behalf of...
    US Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s wealthy investment banker husband used his influence to help an under-qualified student get into the University of California, Berkeley, according to a new report. Richard Blum, a UC alum and regent since 2002, penned a letter to the school chancellor’s office on behalf of the unnamed student, who was waitlisted and had just a 26 percent chance of getting into the prestigious university, the San Jose Mercury News reported Thursday. Blum’s letter was forwarded to UC’s admissions office, which prioritized the student’s application over more qualified applicants, the outlet said. “It is therefore likely that the applicant whom the regent recommended would have been on a list that received priority admission from the waitlist,” an audit...
    A recent audit conducted by the state of California revealed that the University of California accepted at least 64 students due to their connections to university staff or donors over more qualified applicants. The majority of the applicants chosen for their connections were found at UC Berkeley, which the state auditors accused of failing to “establish a campus culture that values commitment to an admissions process based on fairness and applicants’ merits and achievements.” According to a report by NPR, the University of California system has come under fire this week after the publication of a state audit that revealed that admissions officers have accepted dozens of students based on their connections to university staff or donors. Of the schools...
    The husband of Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., helped an unqualified student get accepted into the University of California, Berkeley, an audit found. According to The Mercury News, Richard Blum serves as a University of California regent. The news outlet cited the results of a state audit that concluded several dozen students were admitted to various UC campuses via connections, wealth, and exaggerated athletic backgrounds. In the case of one student in particular, Blum intervened and wrote a letter to UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ to lobby for the student to be accepted. Based on the unidentified students application, the person had a 26% chance of getting into the school. But Blums letter prompted the admissions office to let the person...
    Richard Blum, a wealthy investment banker and Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s husband, is the UC regent who inappropriately penned a letter that likely helped an unqualified student gain admission to UC Berkeley. An explosive state audit released Tuesday found that dozens of students were admitted to the most selective UC campuses over more qualified applicants because of exaggerated athletic abilities, connections and wealth. In one case, an unidentified UC regent found to have intervened on behalf of an applicant who had little chance of being admitted through traditional channels. The audit did not name the individuals involved, instead using generic terms like “coach” and “donor.” The auditor’s office said the lack of identification was meant to protect student privacy. But in...
    LONDON could be on the brink of lockdown after coronavirus hospital admissions triple in a fortnight. However, official figures show the number of people on wards is 13 times lower than it was in March - and new cases are slowing. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 10Officials are considering putting London in lockdown - but figures show new cases are beginning to slow 10The number of people currently in hospital with coronavirus in the capital is 13 times lower than it was in MarchCredit: PA:Press Association 10But health chiefs have warned of a "rising tide" of casesCredit: w8media 10It comes days after Boris Johnson told office workers to carry on working from home...
    SAN ANTONIO – The COVID-19 pandemic has created chaos for school students of all ages, including those applying to college. Since SAT and ACT testing centers are closed or have altered in size and scope for COVID-19 regulations, colleges are making big changes. Many colleges across the nation have waived test score requirements as part of their application process. Submitting scores is now optional for those schools. “We started seeing students having challenges getting into testing locations, (so) we made the decision to waive the test score requirement for the remainder of last year’s cycle. So, that really benefitted a lot of students,” said Lynn Barnes, UTSA Administration Strategic Enrollment Senior Vice Provost. Barnes said that change has been extended...
    WOMEN aged between 20 and 40 are “bearing the brunt” of the second wave of the coronavirus as more of them are exposed to the killer bug. Data from the NHS shows a substantial rise in the number of women being admitted to hospital with serious infections of the virus since the beginning of August. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 4Young women are more likely to be in jobs which expose them to the virus Credit: Getty - Contributor Experts say that the rise in hospitalistation of women could be due to the fact that young women are in roles that leave them exposed to infection. Data from Co-Cin, a Clinical Information...
    (CNN)The University of California improperly admitted dozens of students based on their personal or family connections to donors and university staff, the state auditor announced Tuesday.The audit conducted on the University of California's admissions process found UC Berkeley, UCLA, UC San Diego, and UC Santa Barbara unfairly admitted a total of 64 applicants between 2013 and 2019. "By admitting 64 noncompetitive applicants, the university undermined the fairness and integrity of its admissions process and deprived more qualified students of the opportunity for admission," California State Auditor Elaine Howle said in a statement. "The university has also failed to ensure that campuses fairly and consistently treat the thousands of prospective students who apply each year."In response to the audit, University of...
    FILE - In this April 3, 2019, file photo, actress Lori Loughlin, front, and her husband, clothing designer Mossimo Giannulli, left, depart federal court in Boston after a hearing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. A federal judge on Friday, May 8, 2020, refused to dismiss charges against the couple and other prominent parents accused of cheating in the college admissions process, siding with prosecutors who denied that investigators had fabricated evidence. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File) Associated Press An audit found that the University of California school system "unfairly" admitted at least 64 students into their top ranking schools in the six years before the college admissions scandal.  Students were unfairly admitted to the University of California,...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — The University of California system failed to prevent student admissions based on improper influences and inappropriate factors, a state audit released on Tuesday has revealed. More than five dozen applicants were unfairly admitted to four UC campuses, including UCLA. The audit examined admissions between the academic years of 2013-14 to 2018-19 and found that UCLA, UC Berkeley, UC San Diego and UC Santa Barbara admitted 64 applicants “based on their personal or family connections to donors and university staff.” The majority of allegations were directed toward UC Berkeley, where California State Auditor Elaine M. Howle said that 42 students were admitted based on their families’ connections to the school, “even though their records did not demonstrate...
    In a series of campaign stops, President Donald Trump has in recent days let slip disturbingly candid and revealing admissions on at least three different issues, each one of which would be a stunning revelation and scandal for any other president. But for Trump, the outrages and scandals are so constant that they just fade into the background noise. So these three moments didn’t receive much widespread outrage, though they did garner some media coverage. It’s worth focusing on each of them, though, because they’re important for understanding the president and the current state of American politics — even if we’ve lost the capacity to be shocked by Trump. Here are the three moments: 1. In Dayton, Ohio Trump lashed...
    The University of California improperly allowed 64 students admissions to the school as favors to donors, family, and friends, according to a state audit. The audit was released Tuesday and it also revealed staff falsely designated 22 of the applicants as student-athlete recruits due to donations or favors to families with connections to the school, said California State Auditor Elaine Howle. "We conclude that the university has allowed for improper influence in admissions decisions, and it has not treated applicants fairly or consistently," said a letter signed by Howle. The letter also said the University of California at Berkley, admitted 42 less-qualified student applicants based on connections to donors, leadership, and staff. The audit underscores California's second significant effort in recent...
    Loading the player... SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The University of California “inappropriately admitted” at least 64 wealthy, mostly white students over the past six years as “favors to donors, family, and friends,” according to an audit released Tuesday that found hundreds more questionable cases of students accepted to the top UC schools. Among them were a student whose family was friends with a member of the Board of Regents, the child of a major donor and an applicant who babysat for a colleague of a former admissions director, according to the report from the California State Auditor. Read More: Lori Loughlin’s husband Giannulli sentenced to 5 months in college bribery scheme “This is a significant problem that the university...
    The University of California considered “inappropriate factors” in admitting 64 applicants into its schools — while turning away others who were more qualified, a new state audit found. Twenty two applicants were accepted into UC schools as athletes, even though they had little athletic talent, the Los Angeles Times reported. And 42 candidates got into UC Berkeley based off their links to donors and staff, according to the audit, which scrutinized admissions practices at Berkeley, UCLA, UC San Diego and UC Santa Barbara from the 2013-14 through 2018-19 school year. “By admitting 64 noncompetitive applicants, the university undermined the fairness and integrity of its admissions process and deprived more qualified students of the opportunity for admission,” state Auditor Elaine M....
    Actor Lori Loughlin, facing charges in a nationwide college admissions cheating scheme, is escorted to federal court in Boston, Massachusetts, in April 2019. REUTERS/Brian Snyder Lori Loughlin, who with her husband paid $500,000 to guarantee their daughters' admissions to USC, will spend two months at a federal correctional institution in Victorville, California. Loughlin will stay in open dormitory cubicle housing while at Victorville and have access to classes like ceramics, spinning, and Pilates. Loughlin was sentenced in August and has been ordered to start her sentence by November 19.  Her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, is set to start his sentence at a male facility in Santa Barbara County. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Lori Loughlin will start...
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The University of California “inappropriately admitted” at least 64 wealthy students over the past six years as “favors to donors, family, and friends,” according to an audit released Tuesday that found hundreds more questionable cases of student athletes accepted to the top UC schools. “This is a significant problem that the university needs to deal with,” State Auditor Elaine Howle said in a telephone interview. The audit examined admissions policies and practices over a six-year period at four of the UC’s nine campuses — UCLA, UC Berkeley, UC San Diego and UC Santa Barbara. It reviewed the academic years of 2013-14 through 2018-19. Auditors found that 22 applicants were falsely designated as student-athlete recruits...
    The UC system has inappropriately admitted dozens of well-connected students in the last seven years, according to a new state audit. Four of the system’s most elite schools admitted 64 applicants — including 42 at UC Berkeley — between the 2013-14 and 2018-19 academic years based families’ donations, relationships to campus staffers and other factors. Most of the students were white and came from families making at least $150,000 a year. The bombshell audit report comes a little more than a year after the nationwide Varsity Blues scandal, where wealthy Bay Area parents falsified test scores and athletic status and paid hefty sums to get their kids into selective colleges. The audit says 22 students were admitted through an athletic...
    By Jocelyn Gecker | Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO — A California state audit has found that the University of California wrongly admitted at least 64 wealthy students over the past six years as “favors to donors, family, and friends.” The California State Auditor also found in the audit released Tuesday that campus staff falsely designated 22 of the applicants as student-athlete recruits because of donations from or as favors to well-connected families. One campus, UC Berkeley, admitted 42 applicants through its regular admissions process based on connections to staff, leadership, and donors, but those applicants were not as qualified as others who were denied admission, the audit found. The audit was conducted in response to the national college admissions scandal...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF/AP) — In the wake of the national college admission scandal, a California state audit released Tuesday has found that the University of California wrongly admitted at least 64 wealthy students over the past six years as “favors to donors, family, and friends.” The California State Auditor also found in the audit released Tuesday that campus staff falsely designated 22 of the applicants as student-athlete recruits because of donations from or as favors to well-connected families. Related: KPIX 5 College Admissions Scandal Special Section One campus, the University of California, Berkeley, admitted 42 applicants through its regular admissions process based on connections to staff, leadership, and donors, but those applicants were not as qualified as others...
    SAN FRANCISCO -- A California state audit has found that the University of California wrongly admitted at least 64 wealthy students over the past six years as favors to donors, family, and friends.The California State Auditor also found in the audit released Tuesday that campus staff falsely designated 22 of the applicants as student-athlete recruits because of donations from or as favors to well-connected families.One campus, the University of California, Berkeley, admitted 42 applicants through its regular admissions process based on connections to staff, leadership, and donors, but those applicants were not as qualified as others who were denied admission, the audit found.The audit was conducted in response to the national college admissions scandal last year that embroiled prestigious universities...
    The University of California allowed improper influence in admissions decisions, with four campuses admitting 64 applicants based on “inappropriate factors” such as family donations or their relationships to campus staff, according to a state audit released Tuesday. The audit, which scrutinized admissions practices from the 2013-14 through 2018-19 academic years at UCLA, UC Berkeley, UC San Diego and UC Santa Barbara, found the majority of the admitted students were white and at least half had annual family incomes of $150,000 or more. Among them, 22 applicants were admitted as athletes despite having demonstrated little athletic talent, the audit said. UC Berkeley came under particular fire, with auditors finding the campus admitted 42 applicants based on their connections to...
    A state audit released Tuesday revealed that the University of California wrongly admitted 64 wealthy students over the past six years, some under the premise of being athletes. Campus staff admitted 22 applicants whose families were well connected and doled out hefty donations to the university, falsely designating them as student-athlete recruits. At the University of California, Berkeley campus, admissions accepted 42 applicants through its regular admissions process based on connections to staff, leadership, and donors, but those applicants were not as qualified as others who were not admitted, the audit found. This is a developing story. Check back for updates. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Vandana Rambaran is a reporter covering news and politics at foxnews.com. She can be found on...
    A California businessman said to have steered “Full House” star Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, to the ringleader of the college admissions bribery scheme admitted Monday to paying $40,000 to rig his daughter’s ACT score. Mark Hauser, who was once head of the board at the high school the famous couple’s daughters attended, and is also a private equity and insurance executive in the Cincinnati area, became the 29th parent to plead guilty to participating in the scandal involving top universities across the country. Lawyers for the famous couple said at their sentencing hearings last month that Hauser was the one who recommended they work with the admissions consultant at the center of the scheme. Prosecutors...
    BOSTON - An insurance and private equity executive pleaded guilty Monday to participating in a vast U.S. college admissions fraud and bribery scheme in which he agreed to pay $40,000 to rig his daughter's ACT college entrance exam.  Mark Hauser, 59, entered his plea during a hearing before a federal judge in Boston held virtually because of the COVID-19 pandemic, becoming the latest wealthy parent to admit wrongdoing in the college admissions scandal.  As part of a plea deal, prosecutors agreed to recommend that Hauser, who lives in Los Angeles, serve six months in prison and pay a $40,000 fine. He faces sentencing on Jan. 21.  Fifty-eight people have been charged in the "Varsity Blues" scandal, in which prosecutors...
    FILE - This July 13, 2003, file photo shows Mark Hauser at his home in the Indian Hill suburb of Cincinnati. Hauser, an insurance and private equity executive, is scheduled to plead guilty on Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2020, to charges in a college admissions bribery scheme. (Craig Ruttle/The Enquirer via AP, File)FILE - This July 13, 2003, file photo shows Mark Hauser at his home in the Indian Hill suburb of Cincinnati. Hauser, an insurance and private equity executive, is scheduled to plead guilty on Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2020, to charges in a college admissions bribery scheme. (Craig Ruttle/The Enquirer via AP, File) A California businessman said to have steered “Full House” star Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband,...
    By Nate Raymond BOSTON (Reuters) - An insurance and private equity executive pleaded guilty on Monday to participating in a vast U.S. college admissions fraud and bribery scheme in which he agreed to pay $40,000 to rig his daughter's ACT college entrance exam. Mark Hauser, 59, entered his plea during a hearing before a federal judge in Boston held virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic, becoming the latest wealthy parent to admit wrongdoing in the college admissions scandal. As part of a plea deal, prosecutors agreed to recommend that Hauser, who lives in Los Angeles, serve six months in prison and pay a $40,000 fine. He faces sentencing on Jan. 21. Fifty-eight people have been charged in the "Varsity Blues"...
    LeBron James called out Lori Loughlin’s upcoming prison sentence on Friday, one day after it was revealed the “Full House” alum can serve two months behind bars at her desired facility in California. Loughin, 56, who was sentenced last month for her involvement in the college admissions scandal, had her request approved to serve at “a facility closest to her home in CA, preferably the camp at FCI Victorville,” per court documents. James later took to Instagram to express his frustrations over the ruling. “Of her what!!??? ????????????????????. I’m laughing cause sometimes you have to just to stop from crying!” the Los Angeles Lakers superstar posted to his page, sharing a screenshot of a Vanity Fair article, “Lori Loughlin will...
    The White House has opened an investigation into Princeton University, accusing it of civil rights violations after its president admitted racism exists at the school. Earlier this month, Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber published a letter to the university community in which he acknowledged that the university has and continues to be shaped by systemic racism. "Racism and the damage it does to people of color nevertheless persist at Princeton as in our society, sometimes by conscious intention but more often through unexamined assumptions and stereotypes, ignorance or insensitivity, and the systemic legacy of past decisions and policies," he wrote, underscoring also that for most of Princeton's history, the university "intentionally and systematically excluded people of color, women, Jews,...
    NEW YORK -- Navigating the college admissions process for families of a new or returning college student is always a challenge - and perhaps never more so than during this fall of 2020 amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The list of questions and problems to be resolved may seem endless, but there are ways to plan and to cope.abc7NY.com is hosting a live chat with Adelphi University to discuss the process, sharing expertise and taking your questions. Join on Facebook.com/abc7ny at noon on Friday to ask questions LIVE!Our panel for the discussion features:ABC7NY Sports Anchor and Reporter Sam RyanSam Ryan, who is an Emmy-award winning sports anchor and reporter who returned home to WABC in 2018.She is an avid runner, having...
    LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's health minister said on Friday that the novel coronavirus was accelerating across the country with hospital admissions doubling every eight days but refused to say whether or not another national lockdown would be imposed next month. The United Kingdom has reported the fifth largest number of deaths from COVID-19 in the world, after the United States, Brazil, India and Mexico, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University of Medicine. Asked repeatedly by Sky News about the prospect of a second national lockdown next month, British Health Secretary Matt Hancock said that a lockdown was a last resort but that the government would do whatever it takes to tackle the virus. "The number of people in...
    A proposal is on the table to move to a merit-based lottery system at one of Northern Virginia’s elite magnet high schools. The proposed move for Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Fairfax County would have the lottery system take the place of an entry test, which has long helped determine how students are admitted to the school. While Fairfax County Public Schools Superintendent Scott Brabrand said the change would create a more diverse student body, not all current students are on board with the plan. Krushi Bhaswith Suresh, 16, is a junior at the school, and he said that while he, too, would like to see more diversity at the school, taking the test out of...
    University of California regents banned the use of quotas based on race and gender in admissions, hiring and contracting Thursday — underscoring their intent to limit how they would restore affirmative action if state voters approve its use again. In June, regents unanimously backed an effort to eliminate the longtime ban on affirmative action in public education and employment, which California voters approved in 1996 with passage of Proposition 209. That ban would be repealed by a proposed constitutional amendment, Proposition 16, on the Nov. 3 ballot. But to make clear the UC system would not use quotas even if Proposition 16 passes, regents adopted an official policy against them. The action aligns the 10-campus system with federal...
    NEW YORK -- Navigating the college admissions process for families of a new or returning college student is always a challenge - and perhaps never more so than during this fall of 2020 amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The list of questions and problems to be resolved may seem endless, but there are ways to plan and to cope.This Friday, September 18, abc7NY.com will hold a Facebook Live event with Adelphi University to discuss the process, sharing expertise and taking your questions.Our panel for the discussion features:ABC7NY Sports Anchor and Reporter Sam RyanSam Ryan, who is an Emmy-award winning sports anchor and reporter who returned home to WABC in 2018.She is an avid runner, having completed 10 marathons, including four NYC...
    Lori Loughlin has been approved to serve her upcoming sentence at a federal prison in Victorville, Calif. — her first choice of slammers, according to new court docs. A judge has signed off on the Full House actress’ request to do her time at the facility, which is the federal lockup nearest to her home, according to US Weekly. She must surrender by Nov. 19 at 2 p.m. The Bureau of Prisons still has final approval of her request to stay at the prison’s low-security “camp” section as punishment for her role in the nationwide college admissions scandal. Loughlin paid a half-million-dollar bribe to get her two daughters into the University of Southern California as fake rowing recruits. Filed under...
    Freshman Winston Yan enters the Admissions Building at Harvard University September 12, 2006 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Boston heard oral arguments Wednesday in the case against Harvard University over its use of affirmative action policies in admission decisions. Lawyers for appellants, the non-profit group Students for Fair Admissions, appeared before a three-judge panel to field questions about its position that Harvard imposes an illegal “racial penalty” on Asian-Americans. The case was initially filed by conservative activist Edward Blum on behalf of Asian American students who argue that the university is illegally favoring Black and Latinx students at the expense of Asian American ones. Under the controlling case law, affirmative-action programs that use race as...
    Loading the player... BOSTON (AP) — A panel of appeals court judges on Wednesday repeatedly challenged the legal claims of a group that accuses Harvard University of intentional discrimination against Asian American students who apply to the Ivy League school. The three-judge panel of the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston appeared skeptical of arguments made by Students for Fair Admissions, which says Harvard imposes a “racial penalty” on Asian Americans. When a lawyer for the group accused the school of racial stereotyping against Asian American applicants, a judge interrupted and questioned the basis of the claim. “Where is the evidence of racial profiling here?” Judge Juan Torruella asked. Read More: College football team walks out of...
    An appeals court in Boston heard a lawsuit Wednesday that alleges Harvard University restricted the number of Asian-Americans at the school, Reuters reported. The First Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston, Massachusetts heard a lawsuit The Students for Fair Admissions filed against Harvard University in 2014 alleging the school has restricted the number of Asian-Americans it admitted, Reuters reported. (RELATED: Justice Department Probe Into Yale Finds Civil Rights Violations, Discrimination Against Asian American And White Applicants) Harvard denied the lawsuit’s allegation and said they are promoting diversity in the student community legally, Reuters reported. “We are grateful the judges on the First Circuit were well-prepared for this important argument,” President of Students for Fair Admissions Edward Blum told the Daily...
    (CNN)US Appeals Court Judge Sandra Lynch pounded lawyers challenging Harvard's affirmative action policies on Wednesday, implicitly disputing their claims of bias against Asian American students and assertions of Supreme Court precedent."You started out by saying that the Harvard system is intentionally discriminatory because it uses subjective criteria," Lynch, the most vocal of the three judges hearing the case, told William Consovoy, representing the challengers to Harvard. "But in the Bakke case, which of course binds us, they also used subjective criteria and talked glowingly of Harvard's plan at the time."Lynch was referring to Regents of the University of California v. Bakke, the 1978 case in which the Supreme Court first allowed colleges to use race as a "plus" factor in...
    By COLLIN BINKLEY, AP Education Writer BOSTON (AP) — A panel of appeals court judges on Wednesday repeatedly challenged the legal claims of a group that accuses Harvard University of intentional discrimination against Asian American students who apply to the Ivy League school. The three-judge panel of the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston appeared skeptical of arguments made by Students for Fair Admissions, which says Harvard imposes a “racial penalty” on Asian Americans. When a lawyer for the group accused the school of racial stereotyping against Asian American applicants, a judge interrupted and questioned the basis of the claim. “Where is the evidence of racial profiling here?” Judge Juan Torruella asked. The panel is expected to make...
    BOSTON – A panel of appeals court judges on Wednesday repeatedly challenged the legal claims of a group that accuses Harvard University of intentional discrimination against Asian American students who apply to the Ivy League school. The three-judge panel of the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston appeared skeptical of arguments made by Students for Fair Admissions, which says Harvard imposes a “racial penalty” on Asian Americans. When a lawyer for the group accused the school of racial stereotyping against Asian American applicants, a judge interrupted and questioned the basis of the claim. “Where is the evidence of racial profiling here?” Judge Juan Torruella asked. The panel is expected to make a decision on the case in coming...
    BOSTON (AP) — A panel of appeals court judges on Wednesday repeatedly challenged the legal claims of a group that accuses Harvard University of intentional discrimination against Asian American students who apply to the Ivy League school. The three-judge panel of the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston appeared skeptical of arguments made by Students for Fair Admissions, which says Harvard imposes a “racial penalty” on Asian Americans. When a lawyer for the group accused the school of racial stereotyping against Asian American applicants, a judge interrupted and questioned the basis of the claim. “Where is the evidence of racial profiling here?” Judge Juan Torruella asked. The panel is expected to make a decision on the case in...
    (CNN)A federal appeals court will hear a long-running challenge to college affirmative action policies on Wednesday, nearly six years after the case against Harvard began and as America confronts intensifying racial divisions.The lawsuit was initiated on behalf of Asian Americans by a conservative advocate who has long opposed racial policies that have primarily benefited Blacks and Hispanics. The US Department of Justice joined the lawsuit, siding with the challengers to Harvard, after President Donald Trump took office.Wednesday's oral arguments before a Boston-based US appeals court move the case closer to a showdown at the US Supreme Court, which first endorsed racial affirmative action designed for campus diversity in 1978 by a 5-4 vote. The court has continued to narrowly uphold...
    By Nate Raymond BOSTON (Reuters) - A federal appeals court on Wednesday will consider whether Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American applicants in a closely-watched case that could impact whether U.S. colleges can use race as a factor in admissions. The 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston will hear arguments in a lawsuit brought by Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA), a non-profit founded by anti-affirmative action activist Edward Blum, and backed by the Trump administration. The group sued Harvard in 2014, claiming it illegally engages in "racial balancing" that artificially limits the number of Asian-American students at the Ivy League school. Harvard denies the allegation and says it is legally promoting student body diversity in keeping with Supreme Court...
    FAIRFAX, Va. (AP) — Virginia's largest school system is proposing a radical overhaul of how it admits students to an elite magnet school in an effort to develop a more diverse student body. The proposal touted Tuesday by Fairfax County Public Schools Superintendent Scott Brabrand would eliminate a high-stakes admissions test used to judge applicants for the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. Instead, students who meet qualifications that include a 3.5 grade-point average and an algebra background would be admitted on a lottery basis from multiple geographic regions within the county. The school is regularly ranked among the nation's top high schools, and many families plan their children's educational careers around gaining acceptance to TJ. But Black...
    FAIRFAX, Va. (AP) — Virginia’s largest school system is proposing a radical overhaul of how it admits students to an elite magnet school in an effort to develop a more diverse student body. The proposal touted Tuesday by Fairfax County Public Schools Superintendent Scott Brabrand would eliminate a high-stakes admissions test used to judge applicants for the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. Instead, students who meet qualifications that include a 3.5 grade-point average and an algebra background would be admitted on a lottery basis from multiple geographic regions within the county. The school is regularly ranked among the nation’s top high schools, and many families plan their children’s educational careers around gaining acceptance to TJ. But Black...
    Conservatives see their best shot in decades to get rid of race in college admissions, and they’re taking it. As protesters across the U.S. rage against policies and practices that target African Americans, Latinos and other minorities, some of the nation’s most prestigious universities are fighting a raft of legal challenges accusing them of unfairly weighting the admissions process against Asian-American and White applicants. Yale and Harvard are set to respond this week to two of those challenges as two more make their way through the courts. The multiple efforts to defeat race-conscious admissions, including by President Donald Trump’s Justice Department, could spur an increasingly conservative Supreme Court to revisit the process, even as the U.S. is embroiled in its...
    The University of Chicago's English Department declared it will only accept applicants interested in 'working in and with Black studies' for its 2020-2021 graduate admissions cycle.   In a statement uploaded to the English department's website in July, the faculty announced their commitment to the 'struggle of Black and indigenous people, and all racialized and dispossessed people, against inequality and brutality'.   'For the 2020-2021 graduate admissions cycle, the University of Chicago English Department is accepting only applicants interested in working in and with Black studies,' the statement adds.   Pictured: The University of Chicago, where the English department has ruled that only graduate applicants interested in Black Studies will be accepted for its 2020-2021 admissions cycle  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1...
    HOSPITAL admissions for seven of the most serious non-coronavirus illnesses fall by 173,000 during the lockdown, new NHS data reveals. There were nearly 6,000 fewer admissions for heart attacks in March and April compared with last year — and almost 137,000 fewer cancer admissions from March to June. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 4Hospitals across the country experienced a surge in demand for critical care during the lockdown but new data shows a drop in admissions for non-coronavirus illnessesCredit: Getty Images - Getty The Daily Mail found the trends laid bare by NHS Digital data for England shows similar falls in other admission. This includes those suffering strokes, diabetes, dementia, mental health conditions...
    In this era of COVID-19, visiting a campus isn’t always possible, but universities have other ways of finding out if a student is serious about attending — like whether a student opens an email from them, and how much time is spent reading it. Yes, how closely a student follows the college online may mean as much as test scores. As journalist Jeffrey Selingo found while researching his new book, “Who Gets In and Why: A Year Inside College Admission” (Scribner), out Tuesday, more than 50 public and private colleges, including the University of Toledo and Colby College, use software designed to track prospective students. This includes everything from what they search for on a university’s website — which helps...
    In this era of COVID-19, visiting a campus isn’t always possible, but universities have other ways of finding out if a student is serious about attending — like whether a student opens an email from them, and how much time is spent reading it. Yes, how closely a student follows the college online may mean as much as test scores. As journalist Jeffrey Selingo found while researching his new book, “Who Gets In and Why: A Year Inside College Admission” (Scribner), out Tuesday, more than 50 public and private colleges, including the University of Toledo and Colby College, use software designed to track prospective students. This includes everything from what they search for on a university’s website — which helps...
    By Ted Hesson and Mica Rosenberg WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. officials are weighing whether to postpone or further cut refugee admissions in the coming year amid legal fights over President Donald Trump's refugee policy and uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, a senior official said. The possible postponement - one of several options under discussion - would mean some or all refugee admissions could be frozen until a legal challenge to a 2019 Trump order on refugees is resolved "with some greater degree of finality," the official told Reuters. It is not clear when that lawsuit may be resolved, especially if the case goes all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, a process that could take months or even...
    A California judge ruled this week that the University of California will no longer be permitted to consider SAT or ACT scores as part of their admissions process. The University of California system had already decided in May that it would make the submission of SAT and ACT scores optional for all applicants. According to a report by the San Francisco Chronicle, the nine campuses of the University of California system will no longer be permitted to consider an applicant’s SAT and ACT score as part of the admissions process. The university system decided to make the standardized test requirement optional back in May as part of a larger effort to increase diversity in the student body. This week, a...
    A California judge has barred the University of California (UC) from accepting ACT or SAT scores from prospective students for fall 2021 enrollment because of the pandemic. The UC board of regents voted in May to drop the test scores as requirements for admission into the university after low-income students sued the school, claiming discrimination because they had less access to tutors and study prep courses than their better-off peers. The school cut the requirement but still allowed students to submit the scores voluntarily. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Brad Seligman ordered the school on Tuesday to bar scores from the SAT and ACT exams from its admissions process. Seligman said allowing the tests disadvantages disabled students blocked from taking...
    BOSTON - Another wealthy parent was charged Wednesday with trying to bribe his child's way into an elite university as a fake athletic recruit, a day after two former college coaches caught up in the nationwide admissions bribery scandal were hit with additional charges.  Amin Khoury, 54, of Palm Beach, Florida, and Mashpee, Massachusetts, in May 2014 paid $200,000 to get former Georgetown University tennis coach Gordon Ernst to designate his daughter as a tennis recruit even though her "tennis skills were below that of a typical Georgetown tennis recruit," the U.S. attorney's office in Boston said in a statement.  Khoury is the 57th person charged in the nationwide investigation. He;s charged with mail fraud and bribery. No defense attorney was...
    BERKELEY (KPIX) – The Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT has been a target of equity-minded education reformers for a long time. Now, a judge in Alameda County has found that, because of coronavirus, the test discriminates against people with disabilities. That means the test is out for all the campuses in the University of California system. “I’m all for getting rid of the SAT requirement,” says UC Berkeley senior Sarah Bancroft. “I think it reproduces the same classist issues with university admissions.” You won’t find much love for the SAT on the Berkeley campus, partly because you won’t find many people here at all. While the UC system has been phasing out standardized testing, the latest decision is a profound...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Many Bay Area parents are confused after Alameda County Superior Court Judge Brad Seligman handed down a ruling, effectively barring the University of California system from considering applicants' SAT or ACT scores.The lawsuit was brought by Public Counsel, on behalf of students with disabilities who argue they do not have equal access to testing, hence the test must not be used as a criterion in the process.The ruling comes at a time when the UC system, with its ten campuses, had already opted a test-optional policy after the onset of the pandemic.RELATED: University of California requires flu vaccination for students, faculty and staffIn fact, UC Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz and UC Irvine recently committed to piloting...
    The University of California's nine undergraduate campuses must suspend the use of the SAT and ACT in the admissions process, a state judge ruled, in a victory for students with disabilities who argued that the coronavirus pandemic has made it impossible for them to take standardized tests. The University of California system said that it disagrees with the decision and is evaluating whether further legal actions are appropriate now. “UC respectfully disagrees with the court’s ruling,” a spokesperson for the University of California said in a statement. “An injunction may interfere with the University’s efforts to implement appropriate and comprehensive admissions policies and with its ability to attract and enroll students of diverse backgrounds and experiences.” CALIFORNIA FACULTY UNION CALLS FOR FREE...
    (CNN) — The University of California system can no longer use ACT and SAT tests as a determinant for admissions, a superior court judge has ruled, handing a victory to students with disabilities. The “test optional” policy at most UC campuses affords privileged, non-disabled students a “second look” in admissions, said Brad Seligman, the Alameda County Superior Court Judge who issued the preliminary injunction in the case of Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California on Tuesday. At the same time, he said, a “second look” would be denied to less privileged students and students with disabilities who are unable to access the tests. Therefore, the conclusion is to do away with the tests all together. The news...
    BOSTON (AP) — Another wealthy parent was charged Wednesday with trying to bribe his child’s way into an elite university as a fake athletic recruit, a day after two former college coaches caught up in the nationwide admissions bribery scandal were hit with additional charges. Amin Khoury, 54, of Palm Beach, Florida, and Mashpee in May 2014 paid $200,000 to get former Georgetown University tennis coach Gordon Ernst to designate his daughter as a tennis recruit even though her “tennis skills were below that of a typical Georgetown tennis recruit,” the U.S. attorney’s office in Boston said in a statement. Khoury is the 57th person charged in the nationwide investigation. He’s charged with mail fraud and bribery. No defense attorney...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Former USC men’s and women’s water polo coach Jovan Vavic has been hit with an additional federal charge for his alleged role in the “Varsity Blues” college admissions case, according to court papers obtained Wednesday. Vavic, who was previously charged with racketeering conspiracy, conspiring to commit mail and wire fraud, and honest services mail and wire fraud, now faces a charge of conspiracy to commit federal programs bribery, according to the Internal Revenue Service’s Criminal Investigations Division in Boston. The updated indictment alleges that Vavic accepted more than $250,000 in bribes to help parents take advantage of relaxed admission standards for athletes at USC even though their children were not legitimate student athletes. Athletic coaches from...
    The University of California cannot allow prospective students to submit their ACT or SAT test scores when applying to any of its campuses, a judge ruled this week, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. The school previously stopped requiring that students submit their test scores when applying after the UC regents voted last May following complaints from disabled, minority, and low-income applicants who claimed that the Scholastic Aptitude Test and American College Testing exam are biased towards students who can afford preparatory programs and tutors. The regents had allowed students to submit their scores voluntarily, depending on which campus they apply to. Three, UC Berkeley, Santa Cruz and Irvine, declined to allow ACT and SAT test scores to be submitted,...
    (CNN)Prosecutors announced Wednesday that another parent has been indicted in the college admissions cheating case, accusing him of paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to a Georgetown University coach to help his daughter get accepted to the school as a tennis recruit. Amin C. Khoury, 54, who has homes in Palm Beach, Florida, and Mashpee, Massachusetts, was indicted on two counts, including conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud concerning programs receiving federal funds, and bribery concerning programs receiving federal funds. He was indicted by a Massachusetts grand jury Tuesday. Khoury is 57th person to be charged in the college admission scandal in which actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband Mossimo Giannulli have already been...
    A federal judge has barred the University of California school system from considering SAT and ACT scores in admissions decisions. Judge Brad Seligman of the Alameda County Superior Court ruled Tuesday that the "test optional" policy in place at some University of California campuses offers non-disabled and affluent students an advantage in the admissions process. "The current COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in restrictions in the availability of test-sites. While test-taking opportunities for all students have been limited, for persons with disabilities, the ability to obtain accommodations or even locate suitable test locations for the test is 'almost nil,'" he said. “In short, applicants with disabilities are denied meaningful access to the ‘aid, benefit or service’ that test-takers...
    Mississippi poised to pick new flag after dropping Confederate emblem Four iconic NYC restaurants closed by the pandemic More charges brought in college admissions bribery scandal BOSTON (AP) — Another wealthy parent was charged Wednesday with trying to bribe his child's way into an elite university as a fake athletic recruit, a day after two former college coaches caught up in the nationwide admissions bribery scandal were hit with additional charges. © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this March 25, 2019 file photo, Gordon Ernst, a former Georgetown tennis coach, departs federal court in Boston after facing charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Ernst is facing additional charges in the case, according to a statement...
    Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman were both charged in connection with the scheme. AP Photo Federal prosecutors have charged more than 50 people with participating in a scheme to get students into colleges by cheating on entrance exams or bribing athletic coaches. The parents charged include the actresses Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman, as well as executives at prominent companies, venture-capital firms, and law offices. Coaches and test administrators were also among the people charged. Here's the full list. Visit Insider's homepage for more. More than 50 people have been charged with participating in the college admissions scandal, a scheme involving bribery, money laundering, and document fabrication to unfairly get students admitted to elite colleges. Court documents...
    By Lauren del Valle | CNN Two coaches previously charged in the college admissions scam were charged with more counts in a third indictment filed against them in the District of Massachusetts Tuesday. A jury indicted former Georgetown University tennis coach Gordon Ernst on three new counts of federal programs bribery and three counts of filing false tax returns for allegedly soliciting and receiving bribes from three more prospective Georgetown applicants. Ernst also failed to report a significant portion of those bribe payments on his federal income tax returns, according to District of Massachusetts U.S. Attorney’s Office press release. Ernst was previously charged with several fraud charges for accepting bribes from William “Rick” Singer, the mastermind of the scheme who has...
    By Michael Burke, EdSource University of California must suspend all use of SAT and ACT scores in admissions, a judge ruled, siding with attorneys representing students with disabilities who argued those students have not been able to access the tests during the coronavirus pandemic. The ruling affects six of UC’s nine undergraduate campuses that have gone test-optional, giving students the choice of whether to submit their test scores when they apply. “There’s never been such a thing as a level playing field to admissions for our most underrepresented students, but this ruling at least evened that field a significant bit,” said Mark Rosenbaum, a director of the public interest law firm Public Counsel, which is one of the firms representing...
    The University of California school system must stop using SAT or ACT scores while making admissions and scholarships decisions, a judge ruled Tuesday.  The decision comes in response to a lawsuit filed earlier this year alleging the admittance of such scores during the coronavirus pandemic harmed disabled students who lacked the same test-taking opportunities as non-disabled individuals. Alameda Superior Court Judge Brad Seligman issued a preliminary inunction blocking UC universities from accepting standard test scores in their admissions processes as the complaint is argued in court.  "The current COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in restrictions in the availability of test-sites. While test-taking opportunities for all students have been limited, for persons with disabilities, the ability to obtain accomodations or even locate suitable...
    (CNN)The University of California system can no longer use ACT and SAT tests as a determinant for admissions, a superior court judge has ruled, handing a victory to students with disabilities.The "test optional" policy at most UC campuses affords privileged, non-disabled students a "second look" in admissions, said Brad Seligman, the Alameda County Superior Court Judge who issued the preliminary injunction in the case of Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California on Tuesday.At the same time, he said, a "second look" would be denied to less privileged students and students with disabilities who are unable to access the tests. Therefore, the conclusion is to do away with the tests all together.The news comes months after the university...
    The University of California must immediately suspend all use of SAT and ACT test scores for admissions and scholarship decisions under a preliminary injunction issued by an Alameda County Superior Court judge. The ruling came in a lawsuit asserting that the use of standardized test scores are broadly biased — and particularly detrimental to students with disabilities who seek to take the test during the coronavirus crisis. Superior Court Judge Brad Seligman said in his Monday ruling that plaintiffs had shown sufficient cause to stop the tests for now because applicants with disabilities had virtually no access to test-taking sites or legally required accommodations during the COVID-19 pandemic. “The barriers faced by students with disabilities have been greatly...
    NO child who wasn’t already seriously ill has died from Covid-19, new research has shown. The authors of the largest study in the world examining children hospitalised with the disease found that children made up just one per cent of coronavirus admissions. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3No healthy child has died of the coronavirus in the UKCredit: PA:Press Association One of the researchers, Calum Semple, professor of child health and outbreak medicine at the University of Liverpool said “severe disease is rare and death is vanishingly rare”. "The fundamental issue here is that we did not have any deaths in otherwise healthy school-aged children,” said Prof. Semple. He said the children who...
    Fewer people sought medical care for strokes during the height of the coronavirus pandemic compared to the same period last year, a new study dhows.   Researchers found that hospital admissions fell by almost one-third in March and April of 2020 compared to the matching two months in 2019. Additionally, stroke alerts - defined as stroke team notification of an emergency department patient with stroke-like symptoms - fell by nearly half. The team, from Boston University School of Medicine, says Americans were likely fearful of contracting COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, but that not seeking immediate care for serious health problems could result in severe outcomes, including death.  A new study, from Boston University School of Medicine, looked at...
    Actress Lori Loughlin said she made an “awful decision” during her sentencing in the college admissions scandal. Loughlin was sentenced to two months in prison Friday after pleading guilty to fraud charges, according to Fox News. Actress Lori Loughlin sentenced to 2 months in prison for her role in the college admissions scam. Her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, got 5 months.https://t.co/AQ1qv5Vvyq — CNN Breaking News (@cnnbrk) August 21, 2020 “I made an awful decision,” Loughlin said in court, Fox News reported. “I went along with a plan to give my daughters an unfair advantage in the college admissions process.” “In doing so, I ignored my intuition and allowed myself to be swayed from my moral compass,” she added....
    An offended federal choose sentenced Lori Loughlin to 2 months jail Friday — and scolded the previous “Full Home” TV star for residing a “fairy story life” but greedily grabbing “much more,” by conspiring to pay a half-million-dollar bribe to get her  daughters into the College of Southern California as pretend rowing recruits. “Right here you’re, an admired, profitable skilled actor with a long-lasting marriage,”  Boston federal Distict Decide Nathaniel Groton stated in a digital, Zoom sentencing that was half tongue-lashing, half wrist slap. Loughlin enjoys “two apparently wholesome, resilient youngsters, extra money than you would probably want, a stupendous residence in sunny, southern California,” famous Groton, who earlier Friday had sentenced the actress’s designer husband, Mossimo Giunnulli to...
    Boston — Actress Lori Loughlin will serve two months in prison and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, will serve five months after the couple pleaded guilty to conspiracy charges in the college admissions scandal. A federal judge on Friday accepted plea deals from the couple in a video sentencing hearing. Loughlin, 56, will also pay a $150,000 fine, serve 100 hours of community service and be under supervised release for two years. Giannulli, 57, is required to pay a fine of $250,000, serve 250 hours of community service and serve two years of supervised release. "I deeply regret the harm that my actions have caused my daughters my wife and others. I'm ready to accept the consequences and move...
            by Alanna Durkin Richer  BOSTON, Massachusetts (AP) — Apologizing publicly for the first time for crimes their lawyers insisted for months they didn’t commit, “Full House” star Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, were sentenced to prison Friday for using their wealth and privilege to cheat their daughters’ way into the college of their choice. The two-month prison sentence for Loughlin and five-month term for Giannulli bring to a close the legal saga for the highest-profile parents ensnared in the college admissions bribery scheme — a scandal that rocked the U.S. educational system and laid bare the lengths some wealthy parents will go to get their kids into elite universities. Fighting back...