2020-10-20@14:09:17 GMT
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    (CNN)As another high-stakes confrontation between Democrats and Republicans went down to the wire, Chief Justice John Roberts again crept left and sided with the liberals.Roberts' vote on Monday night, in a ballot dispute in the battleground state of Pennsylvania critical to President Donald Trump's reelection bid, led to a 4-4 Supreme Court deadlock. That left in place a Pennsylvania court decision allowing mailed ballots to be counted up to three days after Election Day, despite familiar yet unfounded claims from Republicans regarding "the taint of" illegal ballots.It was not the first time Roberts, a 2005 appointee of Republican George W. Bush, has moved left in a highly charged partisan case to cinch the outcome, but it may be one of...
    Alex Henderson October 20, 2020 10:28AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on AlterNet. If Nov. 3 brings the massive blue wave that Democrats are hoping for, voters will not only replace President Donald Trump with former Vice President Joe Biden — they will also allow the party to maintain a majority in the House and gain a majority in the Senate. The outcome of the 2020 election remains to be seen, but the prospects for such a sweep are raising hopes about potentially major progressive changes in U.S. policy.  Liberal economist Paul Krugman, though, argues in his New York Times column that even if Democrats are in total control of the elected branches, Republicans will still be in a position to inflict...
    (CNN)The Supreme Court on Monday rejected on a 4-4 vote a Republican ploy to have the Court intervene in a case from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court -- and therefore potentially every election law dispute in the country. But far from a major Democratic win, the decision could spell bad news for the future of voting rights protections. The implications of this decision, with Judge Amy Coney Barrett waiting in the wings to cast the tiebreaking vote in a similar case if -- as expected -- the Senate confirms her nomination to be a justice, are enormous. Joshua A. Douglas Pennsylvania Republicans had challenged a voting rights ruling rendered by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court under the Pennsylvania Constitution to extend the...
    The Supreme Court on Monday night ruled in favor of allowing ballots cast in Pennsylvania to be counted up to three days after the polls close next month, denying a Republican attempt to have the late counting stopped. The eight justices - they are awaiting confirmation of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement - found themselves tied. As a result, the Republican attempt to stop the new voting rules was not successful. The four conservative justices - Brett Kavanaugh, Neil Gorsuch, Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas - all voted in favor of stopping the count. The three liberal justices - Elena Kagan, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor - all voted to allow Pennsylvania to proceed as planned. Chief Justice John Roberts sided...
    “This goose is cooked,” exclaimed Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., at last week’s final confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. It pretty much is. There’s not a lot Democrats can do to hold up the Barrett nomination. Democrats have likely lost this round as, barring unforeseen circumstances, the Senate will likely confirm Barrett to a lifetime appointment on the High Court. Sure. Democrats could go to the mat like they did in the brawl two years ago with Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. But Democrats are playing the short game. Fate may have intervened and helped Republicans play the long game with Barrett. But Democrats look at the polls and like what they see. They suspect...
    The former U.S. solicitor general during Ronald Reagan’s second term believes a would-be president Joe Biden should threaten to increase the size of the U.S. Supreme Court in order to avoid a “reactionary” dismantling of society by the conservative majority. Attorney and jurist Charles Fried is, at first glance, something of an unlikely proponent for judicial reform given his prior legal work for the Reagan administration–which was focused on undoing years of Progressive and New Deal Era reforms at all levels of government; Fried himself had the job of arguing the Republican  administration’s legal theories. But Fried has been critical of the Trump administration. Writing in The New York Times on Monday, Fried praised the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee...
    For the second time in as many weeks, Delaware Democratic Sen. Chris Coons was pressed for his views on court-packing during the Sunday morning talk shows. And for the second time in as many weeks, Coons indicated that Democrats will almost certainly attempt to pack the Supreme Court — as well as take other measures — as retribution against the Republicans for confirming President Donald Trump's judicial nominees, including potentially Amy Coney Barrett. In a Sunday interview with CNN's Jake Tapper, Coons stated that he's "not a fan" of court-packing, but made clear that he would support such a measure if Republicans proceed to confirm Barrett's appointment to the Supreme Court. "We have a few weeks here to...
    The following article is sponsored by the Judicial Crisis Network and authored by Teri Christoph. Hidden behind all the partisan attacks against Judge Amy Coney Barrett is one simple question: is Judge Barrett qualified to sit on the Supreme Court? The answer is resoundingly yes, as Judge Barrett’s brilliant mind and extensive academic and judicial background were on full display during her just concluded confirmation hearing. In explaining her judicial philosophy, Judge Barrett said, “I interpret the Constitution as a law, that I interpret its text as text, and I understand it to have the meaning that it had at the time people ratified it. So that meaning doesn’t change over time and it’s not up to me to update it or...
    A Democratic senator from Delaware said Sunday that he is open to adding more justices to the Supreme Court should Democrats capture the White House and Senate in the November election. “Like Joe Biden, I’m not a fan of expanding the court but we have a few weeks here to see whether there are four Republicans who will step back from this precipice," Sen. Chris Coons told CNN's Jake Tapper during an interview on Sunday.  Asked whether he was open to expanding the nation's highest court, Coons, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said: "Yes." TRUMP CAMPAIGN SAYS HARRIS ‘DRIVING THE BUS’ ON COURT PACKING ISSUE The Supreme Court has had nine justices for more than 150 years, but the Constitution does not...
    You don’t need to wait for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden’s long-promised and still-elusive answer to know that a Biden administration would sign legislation into law allowing them to pack the Supreme Court with left-wing activists. Biden may claim that he is “not a fan” of court-packing, but when asked directly last week whether he would support it, he acknowledged “it depends” on how Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination “turns out.” Well, we know that Judge Barrett -- thanks to her impeccable credentials and hearings -- will soon be Supreme Court Justice Barrett. And we also know that the Biden campaign believes soon-to-be-Justice Barrett’s confirmation process is “illegitimate” and “reckless.” Biden’s running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., said as much....
    A Democratic member of the Senate Judiciary Committee said Sunday that he was open to packing the Supreme Court with more justices if Joe Biden is elected president. Asked on CNN’s “State of the Union” if his mind is open to expanding the number of judges into the court to counterbalance conservative Amy Coney Barrett if she gets confirmed, Delaware Sen. Chris Coons said “yes.” He compared his position to his party’s presidential nominee, who has refused to be drawn on the issue — with Biden only saying he will announce it before the election. “Like Joe Biden, I’m not a fan of expanding the court, but we have a few weeks here to see whether there are four...
    Loading the player... After her confirmation, Amy Coney Barrett will be one of the three current Supreme Court justices who assisted the legal team of then-Texas Gov. George W. Bush in the Florida ballot recount conflict that came down to only one vote at the Supreme Court. Of course Amy Coney Barrett wont say if a president should commit to a peaceful transfer of power. She was on the Bush legal team that stole the 2000 election. This is part of why Republicans picked her. If the election is close they will try to orchestrate another Bush v. Gore.— Adam Best (@adamcbest) October 13, 2020 The court’s decision to cut off Florida recounts in 2000 tore apart the justices...
    Sen. Chris Coons said he's not completely opposed to the idea of packing the Supreme Court. In an interview Sunday on CNN's State of the Union with Jake Tapper, the Delaware Democrat said he is "not a fan of expanding the court" but will remain open to the possibility of expanding the size of the high court. "Well, Jake, like Joe Biden, I’m not a fan of expanding the court, but we have a few weeks here to see whether there are four Republicans who will step back from this precipice," Coons said. "It is President Trump who has pressed for this nominee. So he can have a key vote to overturn the Affordable Care Act. In the middle of...
    A Democratic member of the Senate Judiciary Committee said Sunday that he was open to packing the Supreme Court with more justices if Joe Biden is elected president. Asked on CNN’s “State of the Union” if his mind is open to expanding the number of judges into the court to counterbalance conservative Amy Coney Barrett if she gets confirmed, Delaware Sen. Chris Coons said “yes.” He compared his position to his party’s presidential nominee, who has refused to be drawn on the issue — with Biden only saying he will announce it before the election. “Like Joe Biden, I’m not a fan of expanding the court, but we have a few weeks here to see whether there are four Republicans...
    Bradley Cortright October 18, 2020 0 Comments Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) says that he and his Democratic colleagues are “angry” at Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) for “racing” through Judge Amy Coney Barrett‘s confirmation hearings. Coons was asked during an appearance on CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday if he would support expanding the number of seats on the Supreme Court if Barrett is confirmed and Democrats win the White House and control of the Senate. “Like Joe Biden, I’m not a fan of expanding the court, but we have a few weeks here to see whether there are four Republicans who will step back from this precipice,” Coons said. Coons claimed that President Donald Trump...
    Delaware Democratic Sen. Chris Coons said Sunday that he would be open to expanding the Supreme Court on CNN’s “State of the Union.” Coons seemingly said that his position on the issue was contingent on whether Judge Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the Supreme Court. “Like Joe Biden, I’m not a fan of expanding the court,” he told CNN’s Jake Tapper. “But we have a few weeks here to see whether there are four Republicans who will step back from this precipice,” Coons said. Coons also said that Republicans were rushing Barrett’s confirmation in order to overturn the Affordable Care Act, a point frequently echoed by other Democrats as well. A case regarding the legislation is set to be...
    Former Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg said Sunday that confirming Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett violates “the spirit of the Constitution.” Buttigieg spoke with “Fox News Sunday” host Chris Wallace about his support for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, who claimed recently that Republican efforts to fill the Supreme Court seat vacated by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg were “unconstitutional.” (RELATED: ‘That’s Not What The Word Constitutional Means’: Jake Tapper Pushes Back On Biden Campaign Over SCOTUS Nomination) WATCH: “Mayor, I certainly understand why Democrats are upset with the president rushing through this nomination, but it isn’t court packing, and it certainly is not unconstitutional,” Wallace began. “I think what he’s saying is it’s not in the...
    Sen. Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsSunday shows preview: Coronavirus cases surge in the Midwest; Trump hits campaign trail after COVID-19 Key moments from Barrett's marathon question-and-answer session Five takeaways from Barrett's Supreme Court grilling MORE (D-Del.) said on Sunday he was open to expanding the number of justices that sit on the Supreme Court should Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenConservatives seize on New York Post story to push Section 230 reform Trump wishes Harris 'the best' after aide tests positive for COVID-19 Pennsylvania rejects 372K mail-in ballot applications following primary confusion: report MORE be elected president. “Like Joe Biden, I’m not a fan of expanding the court but we have a few weeks here to see whether there are four Republicans who will...
    The Supreme Court retains a strong but largely undeserved reputation as a protector of the liberties guaranteed by the Constitution. In fact, there is a long history of right-wing Supreme Court majorities serving as dead hands to enforce reactionary policies favored by political minorities who have lost electoral power, or even wars. Most notoriously, a right-wing court favored the South’s radical, pro-slavery positions before the Civil War and, after that war, played a critical role in nullifying Reconstruction and instituting Jim Crow; the so-called Lochner court devoted years to voiding federal and state health and safety regulations and other progressive laws, and even tried to nullify the New Deal in the midst of the Great Depression until it was faced...
    Thousands of masked young women have rallied in cities across the United States against President Donald Trump and his Supreme Court candidate, Amy Connie Barrett.Key points: Dozens of rallies were planned across the country, from New York to San Francisco The marches were against Donald Trump and his policies, especially the drive to fill the seat of the late Supreme Court Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg before Election Day. More than 26 million Americans have already cast their ballots Protesters also urged voters to oppose Mr Trump and his fellow Republican candidates in the November 3 election. Demonstrations, including in Washington, are the latest in a series of rallies that began with massive women’s marches the day after Mr Trump’s...
    Thousands of mostly young women in masks rallied Saturday in the nation's capital and other U.S. cities, exhorting voters to oppose President Donald Trump and his fellow Republican candidates in the Nov. 3 elections.The latest of rallies that began with a massive women's march the day after Trump's January 2017 inauguration was playing out during the coronavirus pandemic, and demonstrators were asked to wear face coverings and practice social distancing.Rachel O'Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women's March, opened the event by asking people to keep their distance from one another, saying that the only superspreader event would be the recent one at the White House.She talked about the power of women to end Trump's presidency."His presidency began with women...
    Supporters of Judge Amy Coney Barrett blocked feminist protesters at the Supreme Court on Saturday as the anti-Trump activists gathered in the nation’s capital for the Women’s March. Supporters of President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee blocked feminists protesters outside the Supreme Court on Saturday, holding signs reading, “Women’s March. All women. Pro-life women,” “I am the pro-life generation,” and “NARAL’s worst nightmare: Women knowing they don’t have to choose between children and career.” Another Barrett supporter held a sign stating that a “true feminist” would fight for the lives of unborn women, adding “unborn lives matter.” Meanwhile, anti-Trump and anti-Barrett activists played music in the background, chanting “RBG” and “their body, their choice.” Some of them held signs reading, “fuck...
    Here is the likely timetable for the prospective confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. As is custom, the committee is holding the nomination over for a week. The Senate Judiciary Committee will again meet to consider Barrett’s nomination at 1 pm ET on Thursday, Oct. 22. FAITH AND FAMILY: A LOOK AT JUDGE AMY CONEY BARRETT The committee will vote to send the nomination to the floor (technically the “calendar,” but that’s another story). A nominee does not have to have a “favorable” recommendation from the committee to go to the floor. Robert Bork received an “unfavorable” recommendation from the committee in 1987 (and was defeated on the floor). Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas was sent to...
    The pejorative phrase “court packing” flows from a couple of questionable premises. First, that there is some morally or legally correct limit on the number of judges that should sit on the U.S. Supreme Court, and second that the use of political power to shift the balance of the court is unseemly. Neither is accurate, since it’s completely within the legitimate power of Congress to pass a law changing the size of the Supreme Court, or any other federal court. In reality, what the outcry against court packing reveals is a preference for the status quo, which not coincidentally entrenches white male minority rule. While the latest round in the court-packing fight has been touched off by the nomination of...
    (CNN)The Trump administration has taken a step to weaken the Affordable Care Act in a key battleground state, with only weeks to go until Election Day as well as Supreme Court arguments that could determine the landmark law's future.The administration this week approved Georgia's waiver request to provide Medicaid coverage to certain low-income residents if they work or participate in other qualifying activities for at least 80 hours a month. It's the latest state to receive permission to require work as a condition of coverage, though implementation elsewhere has been halted by federal courts or state officials.The future of Obamacare is at risk again. Heres whats at stakeAlso, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced it had completed its...
    In an election year packed with political ads, some TV bits will be hits, while others will miss their mark badly. And during the U.S. Senate race between incumbent Senator Cory Gardner and former Governor John Hickenlooper, there have been for fewer hits than misses. Case in point: the National Republican Senatorial Committee’s ad this summer using the deadly gas explosion in Firestone to blithely connect that tragedy to Hickenlooper’s tenure as governor. Gardner, who was the NSRC chair in the 2018 election cycle, finally called for an end to the ad's run after criticism reached the media, though he added that he had no way to stop it. There haven’t been many missteps that bad recently, but viewers...
    (CNN)Judge Amy Coney Barrett, once confirmed, will be one of three current Supreme Court justices who assisted the legal team of then-Texas Gov. George W. Bush in the Florida ballot-recount battle that came down to a single vote at the Supreme Court.The court's December 12, 2000, decision cutting off Florida recounts tore apart the justices and the nation, and the case hovers in the air today as America approaches the November 3 presidential election.Other current justices benefited from the decision giving Bush the White House over Vice President Al Gore, as they eventually became Bush appointees to the bench. Conversely, a pending judgeship for one of the current members was derailed by Bush v. Gore -- temporarily. Amy Coney Barretts...
    Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation is a done deal. Democrats don’t have the votes, and not enough Republicans have the principles. Democrats’ only recourse, many have argued, is to increase the size of the court—“Court-packing” is the derogatory term—to offset the illegitimate appointments of Justice Gorsuch (after the stonewalling of Should’ve-Been-Justice Garland) and Justice Barrett. Presuming they win the presidency and flip the Senate, of course. Joe Biden has notably refused to take “court-packing” off the table, but the idea doesn’t poll well, and there are real reasons to fear it—not least the likelihood that Republicans would retaliate as soon as they’re able to do so. A better alternative is setting 18-year term limits for Supreme Court justices—effective immediately.
    Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation is a done deal. Democrats don’t have the votes, and not enough Republicans have the principles. Democrats’ only recourse, many have argued, is to increase the size of the court—“court-packing” is the derogatory term—to offset the illegitimate appointments of Justice Gorsuch (after the stonewalling of Should’ve-Been-Justice Garland) and Justice Barrett. Presuming they win the presidency and flip the Senate, of course. Joe Biden has notably refused to take “court-packing” off the table, but the idea doesn’t poll well, and there are real reasons to fear it—not least the likelihood that Republicans would retaliate as soon as they’re able to do so. A better alternative is setting 18-year term limits for Supreme Court justices—effective immediately.
    Former Vice President Joe Biden claimed Friday that President Donald Trump is already “packing” the Supreme Court. Biden himself has avoided saying if he supports packing the Court, and dodged the question again at a town hall Thursday. But on Friday, Biden attempted to claim that it is really the president who is “packing the Court” by appointing judges to fill existing vacancies. Biden claimed that insurers were attempting to reverse Obamacare (a.k.a. the Affordable Care Act) in the latest legal challenge to the law. He added: “That what’s this court-packing going on now is about.” “Court-packing” or “packing the Court” refers to the practice of expanding the number of seats on the Supreme Court and then filling them with...
    Try as she may, there's no hiding Amy Coney Barrett's right-wing views. The U.S. Supreme Court was in virtual conference Friday, looking over petitions from plaintiffs seeking court review of cases on which lower courts have already ruled. If the justices choose to grant review to one of those cases—Jackson Women’s Health Organization [of Mississippi] v. Dobbs—it could produce the most serious reproductive rights setback since Roe v. Wade was decided nearly half a century ago. The case involves the state’s 2018 Gestational Age Act that bars abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, even though that is well before a fetus can survive on its own outside the womb. Which makes the case a direct assault on a core element of Roe.  The court will announce Monday what cases...
    After four comparatively civil and calm days, the Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Judge Amy Coney Barrett is over. Barring some last minute revelation, her confirmation seems inevitable. First, the obvious. The Democratic senators could not lay a glove on Barrett regarding her legal acumen, qualifications or character; they didn’t even try. In her opening remarks, Barrett stated: “I try to remain mindful that, while my court decides thousands of cases a year, each case is the most important one to the parties involved. After all, cases are not like statutes, which are often named for their authors. Cases are named for the parties who stand to gain or lose in the real world, often through their liberty or livelihood.” This...
    President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week as part of her confirmation process. Democratic senators questioned Barrett minutely on her record as a judge, pushing her to discuss her opinions on a variety of political issues, including Obamacare, abortion, and same-sex marriage, and Barrett repeatedly declined to indicate how she would judge issues that come before the Supreme Court. Several Democrats, including California Sen. Kamala Harris, expressed frustration with Barrett’s responses. (RELATED: Here’s How Many Times Democrats Interrupted Amy Coney Barrett During Her Confirmation Hearings) “Our voting rights are at stake,” Harris warned Americans. “Workers rights are at stake. Consumer rights are at stake. The right to a safe and...
    Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) has announced that he intends to vote to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court of the United States. Romney, a staunch critic of President Donald Trump, offered praise for Barrett in a statement, saying she is “impressive” and “exceptionally well qualified.” “After meeting with Judge Barrett and carefully reviewing her record and her testimony, I intend to vote in favor of her confirmation to the Supreme Court,” Romney said. “I am confident that she will faithfully apply the law and our Constitution, impartially and regardless of policy preferences.” Romney’s statement on Barrett further strengthens the judge’s chances of being nominated to the highest court in America after the Senate Judiciary Committee advances her nomination to the...
    *** The Pac-12 Hotline newsletter is published each Monday-Wednesday-Friday during the college sports season and twice-a-week in the summer. (Sign up here for a free subscription.) This edition, from Oct. 16, has been made available in archived form. The 2020 Schedule: Winners and Losers The Hotline went waist deep into the scheduling waters this week, not once but twice: First with our plan to salvage the Washington-Michigan game at Husky Stadium; then with a recommendation that Stanford and Cal flip the location of this year’s Big Game to create long-haul schedule balance for each team. (The links to both articles are below in the ‘Hot off the Hotline’ section.) But before the week ends, let’s take one more plunge — specifically,...
    President Trump on Friday said convincing Republican Sen. Susan Collins to vote in favor of his Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett is “not worth the work,” noting that the senator from Maine has not supported him on other issues in the past. “There is a nasty rumor out there that @SenatorCollins of Maine will not be supporting our great United States Supreme Court nominee,” Trump tweeted Friday. “Well, she didn’t support Healthcare or my opening up 5000 square miles of Ocean to Maine, so why should this be any different.” He added: “Not worth the work!” The president’s comments come as Collins has maintained that she will not vote to confirm Barrett so close to the election. “It’s...
    Democratic Presidential Nominee Joe Biden speaks during a Town Hall hosted by ABC News in Philadelphia, PA.ABC News Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Thursday refused to rule out the prospect of increasing the number of justices on the Supreme Court, and said he would announce a firm position on the issue before Election Day. Biden has previously criticized the idea of changing Senate rules in order to clear the way for a president to appoint additional justices to the Supreme Court who share that president's ideological leanings. Critics of the idea refer to it as "packing the court," and Biden has said previously in his presidential campaign that he is "not a fan" of the idea. Biden initially repeated...
     Sponsored by Facebook    Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. Whew, it’s Friday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators, and readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 214,771; Tuesday, 215,086; Wednesday, 215,910; Thursday, 216,903; Friday, 217,700. During competing town hall programs broadcast on Thursday night, President TrumpDonald John TrumpFeds investigating if alleged Hunter Biden emails connected to foreign intelligence operation: report Six takeaways from Trump and Biden's dueling town...
    President Donald Trump on Thursday said that any question about overturning Roe vs. Wade should be left to the Supreme Court, pointing to his latest nominee Amy Coney Barrett. “I think, depending on what happens with Roe v. Wade, I think that perhaps it could get sent down to the states, and the states would decide,” Trump said. “I also think perhaps nothing will happen.” The president spoke about Roe v. Wade during a town hall with NBC News on Thursday with moderator Savannah Guthrie. Trump said that it was inappropriate to ask the justices he nominated to the Supreme Court, such as his newest nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett, how they would rule on Roe v. Wade. But the...
    Former Vice President Joe Biden said during an ABC town hall on Thursday night that his decision on whether to pack the Supreme Court with additional justices if he became president would depend on how the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett “turns out.” “I have not been a fan of court packing because I think it just generates what will happen for whoever wins; it just keeps moving in a way that is inconsistent with what is going to be manageable,” Biden. “So, you’re still not a fan?” ABC town hall host George Stephanopoulos asked Biden. “Well, I’m not a fan, it depends on how this turns out, not how he wins, but how it’s...
    Women dressed as handmaids chained themselves to a bench outside the Supreme Court on Thursday and accused President Trump of “stealing the election” as part of their “installation” representing purported voter suppression. The women, who held signs reading “Trump/Pence OUT,” created an installation which one of the protesters described to the crowd. “These are women dressed in the enslaving garb of the handmaids outfit representing theocracy and the enslavement of women. They are being put in chains, and the voting ballot— booth is going to be just out of their reach,” she said, proclaiming that it is “what is happening right now.” “Donald Trump is stealing the election and suppressing votes,” she continued, claiming that Trump seeks to intimidate people...
    On the campaign trail in 2016, then-candidate Donald Trump promised that if elected, Roe v. Wade would be "automatically" overturned because only "pro-life" justices would make his shortlist for the Supreme Court. Four years and three nominations later, fulfilling that pledge to reverse Roe and reduce access to abortion could be closer than ever.  As confirmation hearings were held this week for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Mr. Trump's third conservative nominee to the Supreme Court, two abortion-related cases have reached the Supreme Court and are awaiting the court's decision on whether to hear them. If the Supreme Court declines to hear those, another 17 are just one step away. "Some are test cases to overturn Roe v. Wade or to...
    Amy Coney Barrett has been following recent precedent in her confirmation hearing before the Senate, pretending that she has never had an interesting thought in her life. Is it illegal to intimidate voters at the polls? She didn’t want to weigh in. A president postponing an election? Hmm. She’d have to think about that. What about climate change? “I have read things about climate change,” she acknowledged, warily emphasizing that she is not a scientist. “I would not say I have firm views on it.” If she had been asked about astronomy, she might have explained, “I have read things about the Earth being round. I would not say I have firm views on it.” But for all the obfuscation,...
    NHL free agency rumors: Joe Thornton playing in Switzerland, Maple Leafs next? From Airpods to skin care, 15 Amazon Prime Day deals you can still get Do you know these lucrative Social Security secrets? Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft The 23 Hottest Gadgets of 2020 Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/19 SLIDES © Shutterstock / Shutterstock Amy Coney Barrett, 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals...
    When Donald Trump petitioned the Supreme Court to shield both his personal and corporate tax returns this summer, he argued that his position as a sitting president made him immune to any criminal inquiry. The high court resolutely rejected that claim in a 7-2 ruling in July, but said Trump's lawyers could continue to challenge a subpoena for his returns from the Manhattan DA on specific grounds. Since then, Trump has lost two more times, with both a federal district judge and a federal appeals court panel in New York ruling against Trump's claim that the subpoena from the office of Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance was merely an exercise in presidential harassment. “None of the president’s allegations, taken together or...
    (CNN)"Nine seems to be a good number. It's been that way for a long time ... I think it was a bad idea when President Franklin Roosevelt tried to pack the court."The words of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in an NPR interview last year point up something important. Whatever you think of the politics, packing the Supreme Court would be bad for the law itself -- bad for the efficiency and quality of the court's work, bad for its credibility and public legitimacy. Ginsburg ardently favored a liberal turn in the law -- but not at the expense of an institution whose workings she loved and knew intimately. Walter Olson Start with a simple truth of organizations: After...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Mnuchin says COVID-19 relief before election 'would be difficult' | Gender employment gap widens with start of virtual school year | Warren rips Disney over layoffs, executive pay Overnight Health Care: Barrett signals ObamaCare could survive mandate being struck down | CDC warns small gatherings fueling COVID spread | Judge blocks Wisconsin capacity limits Amy Coney Barrett hearing reveals Senate's misplaced priorities MORE (R-Ky.) said on Thursday that Republicans have the votes to confirm Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettNotre Dame calendar lists talks by Amy Coney Barrett not disclosed in Senate paperwork: report Cheers erupt as Trump puts on MAGA hat, takes off tie at Iowa rally...
    Calvin Schermerhorn October 15, 2020 7:51AM (UTC) This article was originally published on The Conversation. As a political battle over the Supreme Court's direction rages in Washington with President Donald Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett, history shows that political contests over the ideological slant of the Court are nothing new. In the 1860s, President Abraham Lincoln worked with fellow Republicans to shape the Court to carry out his party's anti-slavery and pro-Union agenda. It was an age in which the court was unabashedly a "partisan creature," in historian Rachel Shelden's words. : Justice John Catron had advised Democrat James K. Polk's 1844 presidential campaign, and Justice John McLean was a serial presidential contender in a black robe. And...
    Sen. Lindsey Graham expressed his frustration at the technical difficulties the Senate Judiciary Committee experienced throughout the confirmation hearing of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. "I think it happened again," the South Carolina Republican said after the microphones cut out for the second time during Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal's questioning. "Are we not paying the bills anymore?" he asked. While the microphones were down, Blumenthal discussed Barrett's use of what is often called the "Ginsburg rule," referring to Ginsburg's statement from 27 years ago that said, "A judge sworn to decide impartially can offer no forecasts, no hints, for that would show not only disregard for the specifics of the particular case, it would display...
    By Larry Keane Foes against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett will line up this week to disparage only the fifth woman nominated to the nation’s highest court. The test balloons have been floated, including attacks on her faith, her family and now, predictably, her view on gun rights. Her foes don’t fear Judge Barrett. They fear the law. They just know Judge Barrett will follow it. She’s vowed to faithfully apply the law as it’s written, not to twist it to a pre-determined end to satisfy a political agenda. Political Misdirection The gun control cabal showed their cards. Over the weekend, U.S. Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) told Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday, “I’m going to be laying out...
    Every Democrat in the Senate refused to say if they are in favor of adding more seats to the Supreme Court amid the confirmation hearing of President Donald Trump’s nominee Amy Coney Barrett. The Daily Caller contacted every Senate Democrat’s office asking them if they would be in favor of packing the court or adding more seats to the Supreme Court, something Senate Republicans say will happen if Democrats win in the November elections. Every Senate office contacted was given over 24 hours to respond to the inquiry. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has not yet commented on the issue but said “everything is on the table,” when asked what Democrats could do if they win back the Senate during...
    Judge Amy Coney Barrett said she would keep an 'open mind' to allowing cameras in the Supreme Court, a move news organizations and public interest groups have been advocating for years. Under questioning from Republican Senator Chuck Grassley, one of the oldest members of the Judiciary panel, Barrett said she would consider the issue, which sitting judges on the high court oppose. 'I probably at 87 years of age won't live long enough to see done, but I've discussed cameras in the courtroom,' Grassley said to her during his time to question the nominee.  'I would certainly keep an open mind about allowing cameras in the Supreme Court,' Barrett noted during day two of her confirmation hearing before the Senate...
    Eighty-eight faculty members at the University of Notre Dame signed a letter criticizing their “colleague,” Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, though none of these faculty members are from Notre Dame’s Law School. The letter calls on Barrett to halt her confirmation process until after the election, acknowledging that doing so might ultimately deprive Barrett of the Supreme Court vacancy. (RELATED: Barrett Addresses Attacks On Her Adopted Children From Haiti) “We’re asking a lot, we know,” the Notre Dame faculty letter said. “Should Vice-President Biden be elected, your seat on the court will almost certainly be lost. That would be painful, surely. Yet there is much to be gained in risking your seat. You would earn the respect of fair-minded...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 9:45 a.m. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham says the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court is a signal to young conservative women who oppose abortion that there’s “a seat at the table for them.” While Barrett has repeatedly declined during her confirmation hearings to say how she would rule on abortion, Republican senators have been clear in their questioning that they know she is opposed to it. Opening the second day of questioning on Wednesday, Graham told Barrett she has been “candid to this body about who you are, what you believe” and this is the...
    A judge from New York state's Supreme Court has been caught on camera shoving a police officer and allegedly trying to use hos powerful connections to stop his wife being arrested.  Officers were called out to Justice Mark Grisanti's Buffalo, New York, home on June 23 for reports of a brawl between himself, his wife and their neighbors over a parking space. No charges were filed following the incident on June 23. Bodycam footage, released by Buffalo Police Department after an FOI request by WKBW, captured the moment officers arrived to find a shirtless Grisanti and his agitated wife Maria. Video shows him appearing to push one of the officers while mentioning his friendship with the local mayor, seemingly in an attempt to...
    Heather Digby Parton October 14, 2020 12:45PM (UTC) The first day of questioning in the Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court confirmation hearings was one for the books. The ritual of strong ideological jurists pretending to have never given a thought to the issues of the day is not unprecedented, but the context for it this time around should be unheard of. We are only three weeks away from a national referendum on the president and his party which, in any functioning democracy, would require that decisions about lifetime appointments be postponed until that referendum is decided. But we don't live in a functioning democracy at the moment, so we are unable to stop a power-mad Republican party from ramming...
    (CNN)As the Senate Judiciary Committee begins hearings over Judge Amy Coney Barrett's appointment to the US Supreme Court, the size of the nine-member court has become an election issue. If, as expected, Barrett is confirmed, the toxic polarization gripping the nation could be further mirrored in federal courts, which are supposed to be places where open-minded judges aim to treat all people equally and render just decisions. Judith Resnik However, to focus only on the number of Supreme Court justices is to miss the systemic issues essential to a fair judiciary. Tens of hundreds of judges in lower courts — both with and without life tenure — decide the vast bulk of the country's cases. To decide what needs to...
    On a surreal day of GOP-generated alternate reality, every Senate Democrat tried to get America to awaken out of the Matrix but only one succeeded. “This is not normal,” said Senator Cory Booker, before asking a Supreme Court nominee if she would condemn white supremacy. (Good news: she did.) “This is not normal,” said Amy Klobuchar, before reminding viewers that 7 million Americans have gotten the coronavirus, including people in the hearing room itself. “These aren’t normal times,” said Chris Coons, before noting that we’re in the middle of a presidential election and an unprecedented pandemic. And yet, nothing seemed to penetrate the thick fog of unreality. Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett stayed on message, rarely losing her...
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    (CNN)Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett brought no prepared notes to her Senate hearing on Tuesday and, at the prompting of a Republican senator, held up a blank notepad on her desk. Supporters circulated a photo to highlight her agile intelligence and to show, as the Republican National Committee put it, that she offered senators "a master class on the Constitution."But that empty notepad also provided a metaphor for how Barrett came ready to give away nothing of her legal thinking and offered a master class of a different sort. Takeaways from Day 2 of the Amy Coney Barrett confirmation hearingsAs Barrett declined to answer substantive questions from Senate Judiciary Committee members, she deftly gave little material for any probing...
    GianCarlo Canaparo, a legal fellow in the Meese Center at the Heritage Foundation, spoke with the Daily Caller’s Samantha Renck about Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation hearings, the future of the Affordable Care Act and more. The second day of Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation hearings were today. A common area of concern from the Senate Democrats was whether Barrett would repeal the Affordable Care Act should she be confirmed to the country’s highest court. “This attack is really interesting for a couple of reasons,” Canaparo said. “Number one is — there is no evidence that she would do that. What we see from her record is that she’s a conservative judge in the little ‘c’ conservative way, meaning she’s...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 8:20 p.m. The second day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is finished after nearly 12 hours. GOP senators are moving at a breakneck pace to confirm Barrett ahead of the Nov. 3 election. President Donald Trump nominated her just days after the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Sept. 18. Barrett told Senate Judiciary Committee members she could not say whether she’d rule to overturn the Affordable Care Act if it came before the court, or what she would do on other major culture-war issues like abortion or same-sex marriage. She said...
    Senate Democrats are trying to turn the confirmation hearing on Amy Coney Barrett into a political victory for their party, but so far they’ve failed miserably. Barrett is the poster-woman the GOP needs to attract college-educated female voters and help close the gender gap come November. Though they don’t have the votes to block Barrett’s confirmation, liberals are exploiting the televised hearings in pursuit of two goals. One is to fearmonger. They warn that in a case already before the high court, Barrett would provide the fifth vote to overturn ObamaCare. The message: Blame Trump. Democrats are also trying to undermine public confidence in any Supreme Court ruling on the outcome of the 2020 election. The message here is that...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 7:20 p.m. Amy Coney Barrett says she doesn’t recall seeing President Donald Trump’s statements that he planned to nominate Supreme Court justices who would repeal the Affordable Care Act prior to her nomination for an open seat. Her comments came in response to questions from Sen. Kamala Harris of California, the Democratic nominee for vice president. Harris questioned Barrett via video stream from her office in the Capitol rather than attend in person due to coronavirus concerns. Asked if she was aware of Trump’s comments before her nomination, Barrett said she could not give a yes or no answer. “I...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — In campaign 2020 we hear a lot about the races for President, U.S Senate and Congress, but also at stake this November is a spot on the Minnesota Supreme Court. Incumbent Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Paul Thissen is facing perennial Minnesota Supreme Court candidate Michelle MacDonald who in her four runs for the high court has faced repeated controversies. “All I can say is it is fake news, my record speaks for itself,” MacDonald said. In 2013, MacDonald was convicted of refusing to submit to a sobriety test and obstructing the legal process — both misdemeanors. In the aftermath of her Representation of Sandra Grazzini Rucki, a Lakeville Mom convicted of hiding her daughters from their father,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 6:10 p.m. President Donald Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court is declining to get involved in the question of whether the president should commit to a peaceful transfer of power if the election doesn’t go his way. Trump has said that he’ll “see what happens” before agreeing to any election outcome. New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, a Democrat, asked Barrett about the issue Tuesday on the second day of her confirmation hearing. Booker asked: “Do you believe that every president should make a commitment unequivocally and resolutely to the peaceful transfer of power?” “Well, senator, that seems to me to...
    As a political battle over the Supreme Court’s direction rages in Washington with President Donald Trump’s nomination of Amy Coney Barrett, history shows that political contests over the ideological slant of the Court are nothing new. In the 1860s, President Abraham Lincoln worked with fellow Republicans to shape the Court to carry out his party’s anti-slavery and pro-Union agenda. It was an age in which the court was unabashedly a “partisan creature,” in historian Rachel Shelden’s words. Justice John Catron had advised Democrat James K. Polk’s 1844 presidential campaign, and Justice John McLean was a serial presidential contender in a black robe. And in the 1860s, Republican leaders would change the number of justices and the political balance of the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 5:25 p.m. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is clarifying her use of the phrase “sexual preference,” apologizing to those who interpreted her word choice as suggesting hostility toward LGBT rights. Earlier in her confirmation hearing, Barrett told senators that she has not “discriminated on the basis of sexual preference,” a phrase that is not used by LGBT advocates because of its suggestion that sexual orientation or gender identity is a choice. Democratic senators seized on that moment, with Sen. Mazie Hirono of Hawaii warning Barrett that the term is “offensive and outdated.” Barrett later clarified that she intended to...
    Allen Eyestone/The Palm Beach Post/Zuma For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.The Supreme Court on Tuesday allowed the Trump administration to abruptly halt the US census, setting aside a lower court order that had extended Census Bureau operations through Oct. 31. As I wrote in September: To make up for delays caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the Census Bureau had initially extended the enumeration period—in which the agency attempts to count every US household that has not already responded to the census on its own—until Oct. 31. But in July, following the Trump administration’s addition of several political appointees to the Census Bureau, the agency announced that it would...
    Welcome to The Hill’s Campaign Report, your daily rundown on all the latest news in the 2020 presidential, Senate and House races. Did someone forward this to you? Click here to subscribe. We’re Julia Manchester, Max Greenwood and Jonathan Easley. Here’s what we’re watching today on the campaign trail: LEADING THE DAY: Florida, Florida, Florida All eyes are on battleground Florida, with President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwo ethics groups call on House to begin impeachment inquiry against Barr Trump relishes return to large rallies following COVID-19 diagnosis McGrath: McConnell 'can't get it done' on COVID-19 relief MORE and Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenMcConnell challenger dodges court packing question 'Hamilton' cast to reunite for Biden fundraiser Trump relishes return to large rallies...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. Supreme Court stops the 2020 census from continuing for now. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 4:45 p.m. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett has declined to say whether she views the criminalizing of in vitro fertilization as constitutional, describing it as an abstract question. The appeals court judge nominated by President Donald Trump to join the nation’s highest court signed a 2006 statement opposing “abortion on demand” that was circulated by a group in her home state of Indiana that has also criticized IVF. While the statement Barrett signed didn’t address IVF, Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois has urged her colleagues to reject Barrett’s nomination, citing her daughter’s conception using the common reproductive technology....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 4:30 p.m. The Barrett children attended their mother’s Senate confirmation hearing just days after multiple cases of coronavirus were reported at the private Christian school in Indiana attended by some of the older siblings. Mark D. Fox, deputy health officer of the health department in St. Joseph County, Indiana, said on Tuesday that three cases were reported Friday from the Trinity School at Greenlawn. The school, affiliated with the People of Praise religious community, has been holding in-person classes with such precautions as daily temperature screenings, wearing masks when indoors and social distancing. Fox said it is his understanding that...
    (CNN)Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett declined to preview how she would rule on potential cases as she faced questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, seeking to portray herself as an independent judge without an agenda."I've made no commitment to anyone, not in this Senate, not over at the White House, about how I would decide any case," said Barrett.Barrett, who would replace the late liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, said Tuesday that she shared the same judicial philosophy as the late conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, who she clerked for in the 1990s and pioneered the practice of adhering to legal text and the original intentions of those who drafted the Constitution. But she made clear to distinguish...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 4 p.m. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett says an article she wrote criticizing Chief Justice John Roberts’ 2012 opinion saving the Affordable Care Act does not reflect any “hostility” toward the law. Barrett was answering questions from Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware, who brought up the article she wrote in 2017 before she became a judge that said Roberts had “pushed the Affordable Care Act beyond its plausible meaning to save the statute.” Democrats have focused much of their questioning on the health care law, as the court will hear a new case in November that could overturn...
    Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett isn’t going to answer any of the big questions truthfully, and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse knew that. So instead of inviting Barrett to be dishonest, Whitehouse explained the forces that put her in that Senate hearing room with the specific agenda—killing the Affordable Care Act, ending marriage equality, overturning Roe v. Wade—she is on the record as having (but is currently pretending not to have). Whitehouse described the Senate hearing room as being like a puppet theater, with “forces outside of this room who are pulling strings and pushing sticks and causing the puppet theater to react.” Highlighting the hypocrisy from Senate Republicans who claimed in 2016 that they would oppose filling a Supreme Court seat in...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 3:45 p.m. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett says she signed a statement in 2006 opposing “abortion on demand” on her way out of church and “in my personal capacity,” separate from her current status as a federal judge. The 2006 statement, which Barrett did not initially include in materials provided to the Senate Judiciary Committee in advance of her confirmation hearings this week, has raised questions for some critics about whether the appeals court judge can separate her personal views from her judicial decision-making. Barrett, nominated by President Donald Trump to succeed the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, told...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 3:05 p.m. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett says she doesn’t consider the high court’s Roe v. Wade decision on abortion a “super-precedent” that can’t be overruled. Barrett said the court’s 1973 ruling that affirmed the right to abortion isn’t in the same category as the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling, which declared segregated public schools unconstitutional. Barrett said in an exchange with Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar that the Roe decision does not have the same secure place in the law as Brown v. Board of Education. Barrett says no one talks about overturning the Brown...
    Tuesday, during an appearance on Fox News Channel’s “Fox & Friends,” Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) criticized the tack taken by Senate Democrats during the opening portion of Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation hearing. Cotton said that given the focus on the Affordable Care Act by Democrats, one might mistake it for a Senate Health Committee hearing. “You know, as I saw in the hearings yesterday, though, I’ve got to say, Ainsley, I thought I’d stumbled into a hearing of the Senate Health Committee, not the Senate Judiciary Committee,” he said. “The Democrats kept talking about Obamacare and pre-existing conditions as if the Supreme Court’s job is to make health care policy. It’s not their job. It’s the job of Congress...
    Tuesday in an interview with MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) called on Supreme Court justice nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett to “recuse herself.” Blumenthal told MSNBC’s Kasie Hunt ahead of the second day of the hearing if Barrett does not “commit to recuse herself,” she will “destroy the legitimacy of the court and her own credibility.” “Plainly, as you know, Kasie, the Republicans have the votes on this committee,” Blumenthal lamented. “They can prevail by raw power, but they don’t have the American people on their side. They don’t have history on their side. They’re losing because the American people want the next president and the next Senate to choose the next justice, and the American people want...
    Four years ago, when many Republicans believed that Hillary Clinton was about to be elected president, conservatives plotted to stop her from reshaping the U.S. Supreme Court. “The Senate should decline to confirm any nominee, regardless of who is elected,” Michael Stokes Paulsen wrote in National Review. “More than that, it is time to shrink the size of the Supreme Court.” Paulsen proposed that Congress reduce the court to six justices, its original size. “It is entirely proper for Congress to adjust the size of the court either to check judicial power or to check executive appointments,” he wrote. This was not, at the time, an outré position on the right. In October 2016, Sen. Ted Cruz suggested that the Senate, which...
    Given an upcoming Supreme Court case on Obamacare, the topic has been raised multiple times by Democrats — and Senator Amy Klobuchar directly questioned Amy Coney Barrett Tuesday over President Donald Trump’s tweets about who he would appoint to the Supreme Court. Klobuchar had a poster on hand featuring a tweet Trump sent out days after he announced his presidential run in 2015, in which he said, “If I win the presidency, my judicial appointments will do the right thing unlike Bush’s appointee John Roberts on ObamaCare.” If I win the presidency, my judicial appointments will do the right thing unlike Bush’s appointee John Roberts on ObamaCare. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 26, 2015 Displaying the tweet,...
    Senate Democrats want the Supreme Court confirmation hearings of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to be all about ObamaCare and, more specifically, its protections for those with preexisting health care conditions. Senate Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein said as much in the hearings Tuesday. That’s because in a few weeks, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in California v. Texas, a lawsuit about the constitutionality of ObamaCare. Democrats argue, therefore, that a vote for Barrett is a vote to get rid of the law. But, as Judge Barrett correctly noted, ObamaCare’s preexisting condition protections aren’t at issue before the Supreme Court in the case. Nor are the law’s limits on the lifetime maximum benefits that people may receive through health...
    Barrett displays all the thought she's putting into her answers Every Republican Supreme Court nomination follows the same pattern: Nominee builds up a record of statements showing their allegiance to the most extreme positions on a set of topics dear to the far right. Federalist Society vets the nominee against strict ultraconservative checklist on the same list of topics. Republican senators pretend that 1. and 2. never happened, as nominee protests they couldn’t possibly speak to any of those topics. Or to anything else. It’s become commonplace for a candidate who has spent their career signing their name to statements calling the Roe v. Wade decision barbaric to suddenly discover that they have nothing to say on the subject while in front of the Senate Judiciary...
    Georgetown University law professor Jonathan Turley said Monday that Joe Biden is no longer the “straight up” senator that he used to know. “I had a lot of respect when he was in the Senate and I find this all rather strange because the Biden that many of us saw in the Senate was very popular because he would speak to you straight up, particularly when it came to constitutional matters,” Turley told Fox News’ “Hannity.” “He had a Northstar that you could rely on. This is not the Joe Biden that many of us saw in the Senate.” (RELATED: Jonathan Turley Calls For Civility In Impeachment Hearing — Gets Threats Instead) Turley told host Sean Hannity that he...
    Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceSasse accuses Democrats of 'suicide bombing of two branches of government' GOP sees falling Trump stock as growing threat to Senate majority Bob Dole claims no Republicans on debate commission support Trump MORE said he believes Democrats are not focused on trying to derail Judge Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to the Supreme Court, with the Fox News anchor arguing instead that their strategy is designed to "make Republicans pay at the ballot box" next month. "I think the push on the Affordable Care Act is less about trying to derail this nomination, because I think Democrats basically realize they're going to be unable to do so. It's trying to make Republicans pay at the ballot box," Wallace said on...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 9 a.m. The second day of confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett has begun. On Tuesday, Barrett will answer questions from senators on the Judiciary Committee. A day earlier, she told the panel she believes the court should interpret the U.S. Constitution and laws “as they are written.” Barrett said in her opening statement that people of all backgrounds deserve “an independent Supreme Court.” Even before her confirmation hearings end, the Senate Judiciary Committee has already scheduled a Thursday vote to approve her nomination. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham scheduled a committee vote for 9 a.m. Thursday, the...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local): 9 a.m. The second day of confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett has begun. On Tuesday, Barrett will answer questions from senators on the Judiciary Committee. A day earlier, she told the panel she believes the court should interpret the U.S. Constitution and laws “as they are written.” Barrett said in her opening statement that people of all backgrounds deserve “an independent Supreme Court.” Even before her confirmation hearings end, the Senate Judiciary Committee has already scheduled a Thursday vote to approve her nomination. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham scheduled a committee vote for 9 a.m. Thursday,...
    Washington (CNN)Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden said Monday that he's "not a fan" of court-packing, providing his clearest position on an issue he has sought to avoid discussing following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg."I'm not a fan of court-packing, but I don't want to get off on that whole issue," Biden told CNN affiliate WKRC in Cincinatti. "I want to keep focused. The President would love nothing better than to fight about whether or not I would, in fact, pack the court or not pack the court." Last week, Biden told reporters he would not address the issue until after the November 3 election, but his comments Monday go further than when he has demurred in his recent...
    Madison Summers October 13, 2020 0 Comments Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has been repeatedly pressed on where he stands on expanding the Supreme Court. After suggesting recently he would let the American people know his position on court packing “when the election is over,” people continued to push the former vice president to share his opinion now. Biden is now sharing that he is “not a fan” of packing the Supreme Court. He was asked by Cincinnati’s CBS affiliate WKRC about his position again, where news reporter Kyle Inskeep said, “The Supreme Court is obviously top of mind for voters, especially today. You have made it very clear you don’t want to talk about packing the court until after...
    President Trump pressed Democratic 2020 rival Joe Biden on answering whether he would support packing the Supreme Court, as some top Democrats have suggested, if Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed by the Senate. “He must create a list, like I did! Always considered most important Presidential decision. Voter’s entitled to know!!!!,” the president wrote on Twitter Tuesday. Trump’s tweet linked to a video of the Democratic presidential nominee saying voters don’t “deserve” to know how he would answer that question during a tense interview last Friday. A reporter for KTNV in Las Vegas told Biden that was the number one issue he has been asked about by viewers. “Well, you’ve been asked by the viewers who are probably Republicans,” Biden...
    Joe Biden has admitted he is 'not a fan' of expanding the Supreme Court to overturn its conservative majority. The Democratic presidential nominee also spoke out against President Trump's rushed nomination of Amy Coney Barrett with just weeks before the election. Biden has previously dodged questions over court packing, an idea which is currently dividing the Democrats who are seeking to sway the Supreme Court back from the right. Joe Biden says he is 'not a fan' of expanding the Supreme Court to overturn its conservative majority Speaking at a campaign stop in Cincinati on Monday, Biden told WKRC: 'I'm not a fan of court packing, but I don't want to get off on that whole issue. 'I want to...
    Monday was the first day of the Senate confirmation hearings for Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, and from the Affordable Care Act to reproductive rights, Democrats raised concerns that appointing Barrett at this moment would threaten hard-won social progress. There has been much debate surrounding Barrett’s “religious liberty” views and how it will impact Roe v. Wade and other laws. However, the threat to LGBTQ rights, such as marriage equality, was only given a brief mention by Senator Kamala Harris in her remarks. And nothing more. Right now, the LGBTQ progress that has already been made is under attack by conservatives at the Supreme Court. Last week, during the first day of their new term, Supreme Court Justices...
              Three members of the Tennessee General Assembly co-signed a letter this week calling for the swift confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett. This, they said, because of her support for limited government, free markets, and federalism. The three Tennessee legislators — State Rep. Martin Daniel (R-Knoxville), State Sen. Janice Bowling (R-Tullahoma), and State Sen. Shane Reeves (R-Murfreesboro) — co-signed the letter alongside several other state legislators nationwide. The Arlington, Virginia-based American Legislative Exchange Council published the letter on their website Monday. ALEC is the largest voluntary membership organization of state legislators who support limited government, free markets and federalism, according to its website. “As state legislative members dedicated to those principles, we...