2020-09-18@23:49:05 GMT
3 results - (0.000 seconds)

the child care industry:

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    One of the industries hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic is also one of the industries on which others rest, often invisibly. Without child care, parents struggle to do their own jobs. And child care is in a major crisis. One in five child care jobs has disappeared since February. Those losses are a jobs crisis for women, and women of color in particular: This is a workforce that’s 95% women, 20% Latina, and 19% Black. By contrast, the workforce as a whole is 47% women, 8% Latina, and 7% Black women. So when tens of thousands of child care workers lose their jobs, it’s hitting people who are already discriminated against and disadvantaged in the labor market. Child care workers don't have financial leeway...
    Lynn Barten has been a family child care provider for 22 years, a mainstay in an industry that has a shrinking workforce.  Barten first ran the business out of her Alexandria home, but then bought a second house to have more space for the operation. She has earned child care credentials, an associates degree, and is a state-approved instructor for other providers. Yet the COVID-19 pandemic nearly forced her to close permanently. When parents began keeping their kids at home, the lost tuition — along with the increased costs of buying outbreak essentials like cleaning supplies — forced Barten to dip into her savings. She went months without a salary until she qualified for a state grant. “I was very...