2020-09-30@08:42:11 GMT
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    (CNN)As 2020 slides into and probably infects 2021, try to take heart in one discomfiting fact: Things are most likely never going "back to normal."It has become a well-worn phrase our politicians, officials, experts, even family, like to lean on — an ultimate, elusive prize.Pandemic denial: Why some people cant accept Covid-19s realitiesPerhaps it's nostalgia for the world of January, a place where daily life more closely resembled our past decades. Perhaps it's a bid to show control, to revert to a time when change was not so universally imposed upon us.But January is long gone, and it's not coming back. And, psychologists will tell you, that's only bad if you can't come to terms with it.We are slowly learning...
    By The Associated Press India recorded 80,472 new confirmed coronaviruses cases in the past 24 hours, showing a decline from a record high two weeks ago. The Health Ministry raised India’s confirmed total to more than 6.2 million on Wednesday with 2.5 million in September alone. It also reported 1,179 fatalities in the last 24 hours, raising the death toll to 97,497. India’s Vice President M. Venkaiah Naidu tested positive on Tuesday and was advised home quarantine. His office said in a tweet that Naidu, 71, is asymptomatic and in good health. Home Minister Amit Shah had tested positive last month and recovered in a hospital. India’s recovery rate crossed 83% on Tuesday and the number of cases under treatment...
    Adam Berry | Getty Images This holiday season, shoppers aren't planning on glitzy and gift-oriented celebrations. Instead, many are preparing for smaller gatherings, reining in spending and directing more of their dollars toward retailers that share similar values during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new survey by Accenture. The majority of those surveyed — 61% — said they plan to minimize in-store shopping to reduce health risks to essential workers, the survey of more than 1,500 U.S. consumers in August by the consulting firm found. The same number said they are more likely to make purchases at companies that show they're committed to health, safety and hygiene.  More than 40% said they won't shop with retailers that have laid...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump and democratic nominee Joe Biden took the stage in Cleveland for the first presidential debate of 2020. Watch the full event below.The Supreme Court JUST WATCHEDThe Supreme Court: Full presidential debate video part 1ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHThe Supreme Court: Full presidential debate video part 1 15:28President Trump explains why he should be able to fill Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's vacant seat on the Supreme Court before the election is over. Covid-19JUST WATCHEDThe coronvirus pandemic: Full presidential debate video part 2ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHThe coronvirus pandemic: Full presidential debate video part 2 15:29President Donald Trump and Joe Biden make the case for who the American people should trust to address the coronavirus pandemic.Read MoreThe economyJUST WATCHEDThe economy: Full...
    Gripas Yuri/Zuma For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.Donald Trump was talking at Joe Biden, and Joe Biden was talking to America.  That’s what happened Tuesday night during the first presidential debate of 2020. Trump was focused on smearing his opponent, and Biden was trying to connect with voters. Throughout the evening, Trump kept his sneering look fixed upon Biden, as he heaped abuse on Biden (and Biden’s son, Hunter). Trump rarely addressed voters. It was as if he was only bent on creating content for Sean Hannity. Biden, in a stark comparison, often peered into the camera and attempted to speak directly with viewers. At one point, Biden,...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump turned his first debate with Democratic rival Joe Biden into a chaotic disaster. Trump bullied, bulldozed and obfuscated his way through the 90-minute showdown, interrupting Biden and moderator Chris Wallace of Fox News at every turn. He ignored substantive questions and Biden's policy arguments, and instead swung at a straw-man version of Biden, taking aim at both Biden's son and a distorted description of his record that exists primarily in far-right media. Fact checking Biden and Trump at the first presidential debateOver Trump's interruptions, Biden responded by mocking the President, calling him a "clown," a "racist" and "the worst president America has ever had." He criticized Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, his failure to produce a...
    Applaud the NHL for hosting an extremely successful Stanley Cup tournament Delicious recipes that dont require an oven After the Pandemic: Cramers Mad Money Recap (Tuesday 9/29/20) The stock market is a forecasting machine, Jim Cramer told his Mad Money audience on Tuesday night. The market is focused on the future, not the past, and therefore is trying to figure out which companies will be successful once the coronavirus has passed. © TheStreet After the Pandemic: Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap (Tuesday 9/29/20) Cramer took a closer look, too. Load Error He said names like Peloton have staying power. Despite the short-sellers trying to crush this one, the stock has held up as the business...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Chicago White Sox fans are doing something they haven’t done in a dozen years: cheering on their team in the playoffs. But this year, COVID-19 is forcing fans to change the game plan. CBS 2’s Jeremy Ross reports the milestone is tempered by the pandemic. It doesn’t look or feel like the post season. It would be nice to say thousands safely packed the pubs in the shadow of Guaranteed Rate Field. Sox signage was up but that couldn’t be said for customer numbers nearby. “This year, of all years, would have been amazing, particularly for us and the other bar down by the street,” said waitress Carrie Stegmiller. It’s the first time in a dozen years...
    DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Local historic restaurant Engine Co. 28 is now combining food, music and a sprinkle of creativity. It's a recipe they hope will help draw business back to downtown L.A. The idea: support local musicians by providing an audience and safe space for them to perform."If we can provide a space for music and L.A. citizens to be creative, then maybe we can get people back to downtown Los Angeles and into the restaurant," said spokesperson Holly Baird.Musician Caleb Minter moved to Los Angeles last year when he got the opportunity to sing at Kanye West's Sunday Services. He's now performing on the streets.EMBED More News Videos Vroman's, Southern California's oldest and largest independent bookstore, could...
    The average American parent has heard their child announce “I’m bored” six times per day since the beginning of quarantine, according to new research. They’ve also dealt with five temper tantrums each day, as well as six “career-best” messes from their kids over the course of the past few months. The study of 2,000 parents of school-aged children examined how families coped with a summer of staying at home, as well as how they’re currently dealing with a school year which, in many locations, is at least partially remote. SWNS Eighty-four percent of parents said they’ve allowed their child to have more screen time than usual during quarantine — and eight in 10 said their child has morphed into “a...
    Nicole Karlis September 29, 2020 9:02PM (UTC) As a Californian with family in the Midwest, my Instagram feed has become a slideshow of two jarringly different pandemic experiences. I see acquaintances in Kansas having large parties, no masks in sight, literally popping bottles of champagne indoors. An old friend having a big wedding in Wisconsin, and a gender reveal party in Illinois, too, were both mask-free affairs. This observation of the digital world transcends into the real one: a close friend who just returned from Iowa said it looked like the pandemic "never happened." The culture around the pandemic in the San Francisco Bay Area, where I live, is much different. In many ways, life still feels like it did in March, when...
    Peter Cade/Getty Images Ashley Madison, a dating site made to help people cheat, released its "Love Beyond Lockdown" report on Tuesday.  The report found the pandemic has given people more reason to cheat, fueled by lockdown frustration with their spouse, a lack of intimacy, and more.  According to the report, most cheating has gone virtual but some are still meeting up with new affair partners in person.  The increase in infidelity among its members comes after an initial 10% dip in membership signups at the beginning of the US's lockdown in mid-March.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Between early March and early April this year, Ashley Madison, a dating site for people to have affairs, saw a...
    For over a decade, The Surf Lodge in Montauk, New York has been a favorite celebrity hot spot, where Hollywood stars, influencers, and socialites could be eating and partying. But with the COVID-19 pandemic, the beach hotel and restaurant has been forced to undergo a bit of rebranding, transforming from party central to wellness retreat. According to the New York Post, the getaway spot is now being sold not on packed summer concerts and buzzed nights out but meditation, yoga, and wellness. Popular: The Surf Lodge in Montauk, New York has been a favorite celebrity hot spot, where Hollywood stars, influencers, and socialites could be eating and partying But with the COVID-19 pandemic, the beach hotel and restaurant...
    Over one-third of food in the U.S. is lost or wasted — about $161 billion worth every year — a problem that has only been exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic. As Tuesday marks the first annual International Day of Awareness of Food Loss and Waste, created last year by the United Nations, experts are encouraging the public to adopt new habits to combat the issue. Farm and factory closures, labor shortages, restaurant and hotel closures, social distancing and other safety measures upended food production and distribution, creating a litany of new food waste issues at the beginning of the pandemic. But the effects are still being felt — one in three families with kids is currently experiencing food insecurity Not only does...
    3 people die in 6 days from climbing, hiking accidents in New Hampshire mountains Get free coffee, java deals Tuesday for National Coffee Day at Dunkin, Starbucks, Panera and more. See the list. The Pandemic Made Me Addicted to Buying Astrology Readings On Etsy In middle school, I attempted to throw myself my own surprise birthday party. I hinted at (aka, told my group of friends) where to have it, which days worked best, and who to invite — only to have the whole park hangout ruined by a mid-spring thunderstorm. Still, this story sums up the type of person I am: someone who prematurely reads the last page of a book and watches movies with the Wikipedia page...
    The first half of 2020 saw 29 retailers file for bankruptcy as the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the already bleak outlook for brick-and-mortar stores whose customers shifted to online shopping. From January to June, 18 retailers, including once-popular brand names like Neiman Marcus, J.C. Penney, Pier 11, and GNC, filed for chapter 11, according to the financial advisory firm BDO USA. In the six-week period beginning in July and stretching through mid-August, 11 more retailers filed for bankruptcy. Among the notable companies that went belly-up over the summer are Lord & Taylor and its subsidiary, Le Tote; Tailored Brands, which is the parent company of Men’s Wearhouse and Jos. A. Bank; and Ann Taylor’s corporate parent Ascena Retail Group. The...
    Ex-Trader Gets More Than Five Years in $20 Million Scheme 2021 Infiniti Q50 Adds New Trim Level, Price Sees Small Increase Most Americans don't know these lucrative Social Security "secrets" Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/8 SLIDES © Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images A change to our collective lives COVID-19 has changed our collective lives in uncountable ways. For some, that meant altering or halting dream vacations. For others, it meant a change of career, life goals, or a reassessment of relationships. Here are the inspirational bucket list changes that real-life people made during the pandemic.
    The first thing you see when you begin streaming Utopia on Amazon Prime is a disclaimer. It informs you that the show is a work of fiction not based on “actual, related, or current events.” How strange, you might wonder. What could that mean? In time, you will discover that, among other things, Utopia is about a conspiracy unfolding across a viral pandemic, after which the disclaimer changes to warn you that Utopia is “not based on an actual pandemic or related events.” It is a show that has the terrible misfortune of being accidentally of this moment, and completely wrong about all of it. Utopia also bears the burden of being a remake of a bona fide...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- Governor Cuomo outlined a multi-point plan to help New York City recover from the COVID-19 pandemic on Tuesday.The New York City Stabilization and Recovery Strategy focuses on keeping schools safe, reducing crime, cleaning up the city, and getting the homeless into shelters.Starting with schools, Cuomo reiterated that he would close them if they are not safe."We will know tomorrow by the data," Cuomo said. "The schools must report to the state the data - they're doing testing. The numbers will tell you the facts, and once you have the facts, you can operate logically. If the schools aren't safe, I am not going to allow them to operate."Regarding crime, Cuomo said the city must start police...
    (CNN)The coronavirus is leading to a secondary pandemic -- hunger. The need for emergency food has exploded since March of 2020. According to an Oxfam report, this hunger crisis could soon kill more people each day than the infection itself.The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates about 821 million people were suffering from chronic undernourishment before the pandemic. Globally this hunger crisis has already been exacerbated by climate change, existing conflicts, and inequalities. But now, coupled with Covid-19, people worldwide have hunger and malnutrition to worry about even more. Here is how you can help:VolunteerLook for volunteer opportunities at your local food bank or community kitchen. By volunteering locally, you support families and individuals so they can use...
    People are hitting the bottle more than usual during the coronavirus pandemic. According to a study from the RAND Corporation, drinking among adults over the age of 30 is up 14% during the pandemic compared to the same time period in 2019. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) The most staggering number of all is that “heavy drinking episodes” among women is up 41%! A heavy drinking episode is defined as “four or more drinks within a couple of hours.” That’s a ton of booze, my friends! Is anyone surprised by this news? I mean, is literally anyone surprised at all? Of course people are drinking more! What else is there to really...
    Daniel Tadevosyan/Shutterstock Shawn Marshall Myers was sentenced to one year in jail after police arrested him on charges of violating a statewide ban on gatherings put in place because of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Police said Myers had more than 50 people at his house in Hughesville, Maryland, for two parties in March. Myers told police his party guests had the "right to congregate" in violation of COVID-19 guidelines, the state's attorney's office said. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.   A 42-year-old man in Maryland has been sentenced to one year in jail after throwing a party for 50 people in violation of the state's COVID-19 guidelines, state prosecutors said. According to a press release from the Charles County...
    (CNN)Americans over 30 have been drinking more during the coronavirus pandemic compared to this time last year, and there could be consequences to their physical and mental health, researchers reported Tuesday. Overall frequency of alcohol consumption increased by about 14% from 2019, the researchers reported in the journal JAMA Network Open. That increase averages out to about one additional drinking day per month by 75% of adults. RAND Corporation sociologist Michael Pollard and colleagues analyzed a nationally representative sample of 1,540 people ages 30 to 80. The participants completed a survey about their drinking habits between April 29 and June 9 of 2019 and then again between May 28 and June 16 of 2020.The volunteers reported they drank alcohol on...
    New York (CNN Business)When the coronavirus started spreading in the United States in March, Best Buy chief executive Corie Barry moved quickly. Barry made the decision to voluntarily close the company's 1,000 stores across the country, putting it at a major disadvantage as consumers flocked to other chains that sold electronics like Walmart and Costco, or ordered online from Amazon. Barry could have kept stores open in some areas where Best Buy (BBY) was considered an essential business because it sold products that allowed people to work and go to school from home. But customers and employees were scared, she said in an interview, and the company had "very little real empirical data about how to keep people safe."It was...
    New York (CNN Business)Dr. Anthony Fauci goes everywhere, including on Fox News, to spread his messages about the public health measures that are necessary to contain the coronavirus pandemic.But he sees Fox's prime time coverage of the pandemic and says some of it is "outlandish."Fauci made the comments about Fox, unprompted, during an interview with me in conjunction with World News Day on Monday.He also said he is concerned that misleading information about the virus is making its way to President Trump. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, is also sometimes a target of Fox News personalities such as Laura Ingraham.Read MoreFox's opinion shows...
    By JENNIFER PELTZ, Associated Press UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Addressing the U.N. General Assembly last week, Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina noted a milestone: the 25th anniversary of the Beijing women's conference that produced a global roadmap for gender equality and a ringing rallying cry that became part of the event's official declaration: "Women's rights are human rights.” The international community has “come a long way to ensure gender equality” since then, Hasina said, but “we need to strengthen our resolve and mutual cooperation.” Hasina didn't really have to say more to show that there was still a long way to go. She was one of eight women among the more than 150 presidents, prime ministers and monarchs who have...
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Addressing the U.N. General Assembly last week, Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina noted a milestone: the 25th anniversary of the Beijing women’s conference that produced a global roadmap for gender equality and a ringing rallying cry that became part of the event’s official declaration: “Women’s rights are human rights.” The international community has “come a long way to ensure gender equality” since then, Hasina said, but “we need to strengthen our resolve and mutual cooperation.” Hasina didn’t really have to say more to show that there was still a long way to go. She was one of eight women among the more than 150 presidents, prime ministers and monarchs who have spoken so far at the...
    Aggrieved juror in Breonna Taylor case wants grand jury recordings released, attorney says Bermuda Championship to allow limited number of fans to attend The Walking Dead universe chief says the pandemic made him realize how important toilet paper would be during the zombie apocalypse © Jackson Lee Davis/AMC We'll see our heroes outwit the dead on "TWD" finale October 4. Jackson Lee Davis/AMC "The Walking Dead" universe chief content officer Scott Gimple told Insider the show never considered people hoarding toilet paper during AMC's fictional zombie apocalypse. It's one thing Gimple and the creative teams have thought about since the coronavirus pandemic. He said it's "weird" to look back at a previous season of "TWD" where characters were...
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Addressing the U.N. General Assembly last week, Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina noted a milestone: the 25th anniversary of the Beijing women’s conference that produced a global roadmap for gender equality and a ringing rallying cry that became part of the event’s official declaration: “Women’s rights are human rights.” The international community has “come a long way to ensure gender equality” since then, Hasina said, but “we need to strengthen our resolve and mutual cooperation.” Hasina didn’t really have to say more to show that there was still a long way to go. She was one of eight women among the more than 150 presidents, prime ministers and monarchs who have spoken so far at the...
    TANZANIA – Addressing the U.N. General Assembly last week, Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina noted a milestone: the 25th anniversary of the Beijing women's conference that produced a global roadmap for gender equality and a ringing rallying cry that became part of the event's official declaration: "Women's rights are human rights.” The international community has “come a long way to ensure gender equality” since then, Hasina said, but “we need to strengthen our resolve and mutual cooperation.” Hasina didn't really have to say more to show that there was still a long way to go. She was one of eight women among the more than 150 presidents, prime ministers and monarchs who have spoken so far at the planet’s top...
    During the early stages of the coronavirus lockdown heavy drinking 'increased sharply', particularly among women, according to a new study. Researchers from the RAND Corporation surveyed 1,540 adults from the US during the peak of coronavirus to determine any changes in drinking habits. The team found that binge drinking among women - defined as four or more drinks within a couple of hours - soared by 41 per cent over the previous year.  The increase in alcohol consumption during lockdown could lead to worsening mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, study authors warn. The team found that binge drinking among women - defined as four or more drinks within a couple of hours - soared by 41...
    (CNN)A group of students at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine started a new tradition by creating a more inclusive Hippocratic oath to acknowledge racism, the coronavirus pandemic and the killing of Breonna Taylor.The symbolic white coat ceremony marks the beginning of an academic journey for students in medical programs across the country -- it's a time when students accept their white medical coats and recite an oath vowing to be fair and ethical as they begin their medical education. As part of their orientation, first-year medical students were challenged by Chenits Pettigrew, the medical school's associate dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and assistant dean for Student Affairs, to create a new class oath that acknowledged "their ever-evolving...
    We'll see our heroes outwit the dead on "TWD" finale October 4. Jackson Lee Davis/AMC "The Walking Dead" universe chief content officer Scott Gimple told Insider the show never considered people hoarding toilet paper during AMC's fictional zombie apocalypse. It's one thing Gimple and the creative teams have thought about since the coronavirus pandemic. He said it's "weird" to look back at a previous season of "TWD" where characters were in quarantine from a deadly outbreak and wearing masks.  The pandemic has also forced them to change how they're making upcoming episodes. New episodes for the franchise return October 4 on AMC. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. For 10 years, AMC's "The Walking Dead" has envisioned...
    Calif. wildfires: Entire city of Calistoga evacuated How Amy Coney Barrett Could Alter the Future of the U.S.s Climate Change Policy Most Americans don't know these lucrative Social Security "secrets" Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/7 SLIDES © Provided by Eat This, Not That! 6 Recent Changes at the Grocery Store You Need to Know About We can barely count all the ways the grocery shopping experience has changed this year. From the early days of the pandemic, when certain items were in short supply and strict safety measures were enforced by most retailers, to the most recent changes which are shifting things...
    One in three parents doesn’t intend to have their child vaccinated for the flu this season, according to a new poll, despite the potential threat of a second wave of COVID-19 cases. Health officials have increasingly emphasized the importance of vaccinations this year, in part to limit stress on the health care system during the coronavirus pandemic. If the flu is not controlled, officials say hospitals may become overwhelmed by dealing with both. Despite this, 32 percent of parents say their child is “unlikely” to get a flu vaccine, according to the recent National Poll on Children’s Health. Of them, 42 percent of the parents say they are worried about the side effects of the flu vaccine. Meanwhile, other parents...
    Billie Her, a warehouse associate, wraps plastic around a pallet of boxes at Amazon's Fulfillment Center in Thornton, Colorado.Helen H. Richardson| The Denver Post | Getty Images The coronavirus pandemic has not only killed more than 1 million people around the world. It's also devastated the global economy, brought industries to a complete standstill, spurred mass layoffs and, in the case of retail, accelerated the slow-moving demise of already ailing department store chains. Amazon is one of the few exceptions. The e-commerce giant, with its seemingly endless selection and drive to deliver convenience and low prices, became the default retailer and an essential service for many consumers at the height of the coronavirus crisis. Facing store closures and empty shelves, shoppers...
    New York (CNN Business)Six months into the pandemic, Americans are beginning to feel much better about the economic recovery. Consumer confidence soared to its highest level since Covid-19 swept across the country, The Conference Board reported Tuesday.In spite of rising infections, stalled negotiations for another stimulus package on Capitol Hill and a slowing jobs recovery, Americans are increasingly optimistic about the short-term business outlook, the job market, and their financial prospects."This is much needed good news about the American consumer and potential spending," said Jennifer Lee, senior economist at BMO.Some two-thirds of the US economy rely on consumer spending, so how people feel about this recovery is an important piece of the puzzle as the country tries to get back...
    One in three parents doesn’t intend to have their child vaccinated for the flu this season, according to a new poll, despite the potential threat of a second wave of COVID-19 cases. Health officials have increasingly emphasized the importance of vaccinations this year, in part to limit stress on the health care system during the coronavirus pandemic. If the flu is not controlled, officials say hospitals may become overwhelmed by dealing with both. Despite this, 32 percent of parents say their child is “unlikely” to get a flu vaccine, according to the recent National Poll on Children’s Health. Of them, 42 percent of the parents say they are worried about the side effects of the flu vaccine. Meanwhile, other parents...
    PILSEN — A new mural at 18th and Carpenter streets is shining a light on Pilsen’s essential workers who have put themselves at risk amid the coronavirus pandemic. Inspired by the dedication of Latino workers, artists Mateo Zapata and Pablo Serrano created the mural to pay homage to three essential workers: Juanito, a butcher shop worker, Rosalinda, co-owner of the Los Jazmine’s where the mural is located, and Javier, a U.S. Postal Service worker from Pilsen. The mural is set against an indigenous serape pattern and Pilsen is prominently featured with the words “El corazon de Chicago” — “the heart of Chicago.” “Each one of these people symbolizes not only the work ethic but also how real … their love is for...
    Justin Paget/Getty Images Children have experienced an increase in average heart rate since the start of the pandemic. Data from Mightier, a biofeedback therapy program, show an increase of 2 beats per minute between March and July. This increase is well within the normal range, but it’s a statistically significant physical indicator of how the pandemic has disrupted kids’ lives. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Parents are familiar with the toll the coronavirus pandemic is taking on their kids. Children who once slept through the night are climbing back into bed with them, and toddlers might be regressing on their toilet training progress, child development psychologist Tovah Klein told Insider. These behavioral and emotional changes are...
    The Destiny USA mall reopens as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions are eased in Syracuse, New York.Maranie Staab | Reuters Few in retail could have predicted that a newly discovered virus would spread widely beyond China's borders earlier this year, morph into a pandemic, lead to a recession and change the trajectory of many businesses.  When the outbreak began, some companies spoke about Covid-19 but described it as a temporary inconvenience or a supply chain challenge. Best Buy CEO Corie Barry told investors on a late February conference call that the company viewed the coronavirus "as a relatively short-term disruption that does not impact our long-term strategy and initiatives." In recent remarks, Walmart Chief Financial Officer Brett Biggs reflected on the retailer's expectations in...
    At this point, there's hardly any social ill that the COVID-19 pandemic hasn't made worse — but some of the negative effects are more surprising than others. For example, since the rise of the novel coronavirus, motor vehicle theft in the Denver metro area has spiked, too. In a serious way. That's the conclusion of Colorado's Metropolitan Auto Theft Task Force (C-MATT), a police agency coalition based in Jefferson County that's primarily funded by the Colorado Auto Theft Prevention Authority through automobile insurance fees. The organization's statistics reveal that the number of automobiles taken for illicit rides has more than doubled since the month before COVID-19 became a household term in Colorado.Related Stories Boulder's Insane College-Age Gatherings Ban Works — Sort...
    SAN ANTONIO – Elderly people are missing their family and friends more than normal right now because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but it might not be that safe to see them. If your loved ones are persistent on you visiting, there are some things to consider before making the trip. The most vulnerable people should continue to stay home if they can, and that includes those over the age of 60 and people with chronic illnesses because they are more likely to become severely ill if they get coronavirus. Next, discuss why you want to visit and acknowledge the risk involved. Have you been staying home and limiting your exposures or have you had to work in environments that could...
    Yard signs supporting U.S. President Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee and former Vice President Joe Biden are seen outside of an early voting site at the Fairfax County Government Center in Fairfax, Virginia, September 18, 2020.Al Drago | Reuters WASHINGTON — On a balmy South Florida night in January, President Donald Trump's top campaign donors gathered at the Palm Beach estate of billionaire Bill Koch for a thank-you party hosted by Republican National Committee chairwoman Ronna McDaniel and Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner.  They had a lot to celebrate. In 2019, the Trump reelection effort, which is composed of the official campaign committee and several joint committees with the RNC, raised $463 million. While Democrats continued burning through money...
    The Washington Monument will be the latest attraction on the National Mall to reopen amid the Covid-19 crisis when it welcomes visitors back starting Thursday. The monument has been closed since March when the pandemic first set its teeth into the region. It will return to seven-day-a-week operations with a new set of safety and cleaning protocols. Tickets to get inside 555-foot memorial to the first U.S. president will be available only online to prevent visitors from forming long lines at the site. There is a $1.50 nonrefundable reservation for each ticket, which allows entrance for up to a group of four. Tickets will be available starting at 10 a.m. Wednesday and are only be available at recreation.gov....
    The stage of an open mic is a “portal to the infinite,” says Anthony Ruptak, singer-songwriter and longtime host of the Syntax Songwriters Open Mic at the Broadway Roxy. “It’s a gateway to self-love, relationships and self-worth. It’s a valuable tool for growth and community feedback.” Before COVID-19, Denver hosted over a dozen weekly and monthly open mics at venues that ranged from coffeehouses to bars, attracting both large turnouts in front of stages and intimate crowds in brewery corners. What they all had in common was the creation of a safe space for individuals and community to grow. These days, those stages are virtual or largely nonexistent, and all are under threat as independent venues and businesses struggle to...
    Alex Henderson September 29, 2020 11:40AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on AlterNet. Under President Donald Trump's leadership, the United States has the highest COVID-19 death count in the world — and states with Republican governors, including Florida and Texas, had some of the worst coronavirus surges over the summer. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas tried to defend the GOP response to the COVID-19 pandemic during a Monday, September 28 appearance on ABC's "The View" — and it didn't go well for the GOP senator. Grilling Cruz forcefully, liberal co-host Joy Behar noted that Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis "recently lifted all restrictions on businesses, allowing bars and restaurants to operate at full capacity without a mask mandate. He...
    The coronavirus pandemic has reshaped Americans’ home buying experience by making it more consumer friendly, and will have significant and lasting consequences on how consumers buy and sell homes. Last March, when the U.S. was first coming to grips with the public health crisis, I suggested how it could affect the housing industry — such as the increased digitization of the mortgage process to better serve consumers. Since it appears that the pandemic will not be fully behind us in the coming months, here are three ways in which the home buying experience may have changed forever: 1. Home buying has gone remote: Most of us by now are comfortable with video interactions. Last March, one online home listing...
    LSU fans aren’t letting the coronavirus pandemic stop them from drinking a few beers before football games. Sports Illustrated recently published a fascinating piece about the tailgating experience prior to the Tigers playing during the pandemic. Tailgating is banned on campus during the 2020 season, but you’d be foolish to think that’s going to stop people from having a good time. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) What does the “Tailgating Capital of the World” do when tailgating is banned on campus? They obtain a tax assessor’s map, identify campus borders & party on adjacent property. “Hurricanes, viruses & governors.. nobody is stopping us from tailgating.”https://t.co/rPAOxp7RiW pic.twitter.com/mxc7OeLuMZ — Ross Dellenger (@RossDellenger) September 28, 2020 ...
    By The Associated Press UNITED NATIONS — United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres says the loss of 1 million people to the coronavirus is an “agonizing milestone" that has been made worse by the “savageness of this disease." In a statement released after the global death toll from the pandemic crossed 1 million, Guterres called it a “mind-numbing figure." “They were fathers and mothers, wives and husbands, brothers and sisters, friends and colleagues,” he said. “The pain has been multiplied by the savageness of this disease. Risks of infection kept families from bedsides. And the process of mourning and celebrating a life was often made impossible.” Guterres warned “there is no end in sight to the spread of the virus, the...
    NEWPORT BEACH (CBSLA) — Demand for an Orange County-based e-bike company has been skyrocketing during the coronavirus pandemic. “We’ve hired about four times more than what we started the year with,” said Sean Lupton-Smith of Electric Bike Company. “COVID-19 has in fact, almost helped our business because more people want to get outside. They want to get exercise. They want to go together as a family.” Instead of shutting down at the start of the pandemic nearly six months ago, Lupton-Smith’s team decided to have everyone work separate eight-hour shifts around the clock. Pre-coronavirus, he built and sold 50 bikes each week. Now, he’s building, packing and shipping 150 custom electric bicycles per week. Customers can design bikes to suit...
    UNITED NATIONS — United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres says the loss of 1 million people to the coronavirus is an “agonizing milestone” that has been made worse by the “savageness of this disease.” In a statement released after the global death toll from the pandemic crossed 1 million, Guterres called it a “mind-numbing figure.” “They were fathers and mothers, wives and husbands, brothers and sisters, friends and colleagues,” he said. “The pain has been multiplied by the savageness of this disease. Risks of infection kept families from bedsides. And the process of mourning and celebrating a life was often made impossible.” Guterres warned “there is no end in sight to the spread of the virus, the loss of jobs, the...
    UNITED NATIONS — United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres says the loss of 1 million people to the coronavirus is an “agonizing milestone" that has been made worse by the “savageness of this disease." In a statement released after the global death toll from the pandemic crossed 1 million, Guterres called it a “mind-numbing figure." “They were fathers and mothers, wives and husbands, brothers and sisters, friends and colleagues,” he said. “The pain has been multiplied by the savageness of this disease. Risks of infection kept families from bedsides. And the process of mourning and celebrating a life was often made impossible.” Guterres warned “there is no end in sight to the spread of the virus, the loss of jobs, the...
    Former Obama National Security Advisor Susan Rice said on Monday’s broadcast of MSNBC’s “All In” that President Donald Trump had “refused to understand the world that we live in, the nature of the threats we face.” She cited the coronavirus pandemic. Rice said, “I think American voters who are focussed on our international standing have to be extraordinarily dismayed. Poll after poll shows that our allies don’t trust us, that our confidence and approval of the people is in the gutter. And, yet, more importantly, we are not seeing out of the president the leadership that we need to keep us safe. National security is about keeping the American people safe, and we have lost over 200,000 Americans to COVID-19. The...
    EDMONTON, Alberta (AP) — Tampa Bay beats Dallas to win Stanley Cup; NHL the 1st major North American sports league to crown champion in pandemic. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    (Reuters) - Here are some key developments as the novel coronavirus spread around the world: Dec. 31, 2019: China alerts the World Health Organization of 27 cases of "viral pneumonia" in the central city of Wuhan. Authorities shut down a wet market in Wuhan the next day, after discovering some patients were vendors or dealers. Jan. 11, 2020: A 61-year-old man is reported as the first death. Preliminary lab tests cited by Chinese state media point to a new type of coronavirus. Jan. 13: A Chinese woman is quarantined in Thailand, the first detection of the virus outside China. Jan. 15: Japan confirms its first case. Jan. 20: South Korea confirms its first case. Jan. 22: The WHO convenes an...
    This week, Mike McCarthy didn’t go for two when down by nine How to live the RV life for cheap How the U.S. economic response to the coronavirus pandemic stacks up to the rest of the world The world reached a grim milestone as 1 million people have died from the coronavirus since the pandemic started, with more than 200,000 of those deaths coming from the U.S. alone.  © Provided by CNBC U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell share an elbow bump greeting prior to testifying before a House Financial Services Committee hearing on oversight of the Treasury Department's and Federal Reserve's coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic response on Capitol Hill in Washington, September 22,...
    The Covid-19 pandemic that swept rapidly around the world over the last nine months didn't hit all countries or health systems equally.  Medical workers — some laboring in challenging conditions and without enough personal protective equipment  — said they've done their best to save as many patients as possible. Still, the death toll continues to rise.  More than 1 million people — likely many more, given inadequate reporting in some regions — have now died from Covid-19. The virus, which first appeared in Wuhan, China, has spread to most countries around the world. Some of the worst outbreaks materialized in both hemispheres, as far afield as Brazil, the U.S., and Italy.  Even in wealthier countries with advanced health systems, such...
    A municipal worker sanitizes a Roman Catholic Church graveyard after the burial of Covid-19 coronavirus infected people in Ranchi on September 6, 2020.AFP | Getty Images The coronavirus has killed at least 1 million people across the globe, a nightmarish milestone in the world's fight against the virus that emerged from Wuhan, China, late last year, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.  Roughly half of the world's total Covid-19 fatalities have been reported in only four countries — the United States, Brazil, India and Mexico, according to Hopkins data. The U.S. reached a death toll above 200,000 people last week, more than any other country on the planet. Declared a pandemic over six months ago, the coronavirus has swept...
    Phillip Lindsay “trending in right direction” to return Thursday The Food In Your Fridge You Need to Throw Out Pandemic Pallets filled with stockpiled items are reportedly gaining popularity at grocery stores ahead of the winter months © eldar nurkovic/Shutterstock eldar nurkovic/Shutterstock Some grocers are starting to compile "pandemic pallets" as they prepare for another possible surge in cases during the winter, according to a new report from The Wall Street Journal. Some pallets are reportedly focused on food, while others are for cleaning supplies and other goods to keep buyers healthy. While food shortages aren't as common as they were earlier this year, grocery stores could still see some limited variety. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The Baltimore-based nonprofit TasteWise Kids is changing the way they teach families about food and nutrition. The mission of the non-profit is to inspire kids to explore and experience the world of food and its sources. But that became tough with the pandemic. The organization is re-inventing its programs so teachers, principles and parents could still learn about the importance of food. Providing lessons online like one from a local farmer about how to make an herb planter at home and an online cooking class from Clavel’s Chef Carlos Raba. “To help them learn where their food comes from,” said Julie Phillips. Phillips said TasteWise’s program inspired the whole family to get involved at a time when...
    “Saturday Night Live” is ready to start performing once again in front of a live studio audience and those interested must undergo a lengthy series of questions and a test. Due to the pandemic, filming of the show in the studio was shut down and the return this Saturday for cast, crew and audience members means taking coronavirus tests and more in an effort to try to keep from spreading the virus, per the Hollywood Reporter in a piece published Monday. (RELATED: Eddie Murphy Explains Why He’s Making A Return To ‘Saturday Night Live’) ‘SNL’ reveals how COVID-19-era live audience will work: https://t.co/Rv7JBkP62G pic.twitter.com/OAJ0CgKTii — The Hollywood Reporter (@THR) September 28, 2020 “All guests will be required to take...
    Elon Musk has revealed he will not get a coronavirus vaccine when they're available because he's 'not at risk' and defends keeping his Tesla factories up and running amid the pandemic.  The 49-year-old tech giant defended opening up Tesla factories in defiance of lockdowns - a lengthy saga that has seen him sue Alameda County, launch a profanity-laden rant about how lockdowns are 'unethical' and allegedly fire employees who didn't feel safe enough to return to work.  The Tesla and SpaceX founder said Monday in an interview with Kara Swisher on the New York Times' podcast Sway that even when vaccines are readily accessible, he won't take one. When asked 'Will you get a vaccine? What will you do with your own family?'...
    One in three parents doesn't intend to have their child vaccinated for the flu this season, according to a new poll, despite the potential threat of a second wave of COVID-19 cases. Health officials have increasingly emphasized the importance of vaccinations this year, in part to limit stress on the health care system during the coronavirus pandemic. If the flu is not controlled, officials say hospitals may become overwhelmed by dealing with both. FDA COMMISSIONER ON FLU SEASON AMID CORONAVIRUS: ‘WE NEED TO BE PREPARED’ Despite this, 32% of parents say their child is "unlikely" to get a flu vaccine, according to the recent National Poll on Children's Health. (iStock) Of them, 42% of the parents say they are worried about the side effects of the flu...
    (CNN)As the world braces for a possible second wave of the Covid-19 pandemic, there is also growing concern in the counterterrorism, scientific and global public health communities over the potential future threat posed by bio-engineered pathogens.A few weeks ago, scientists at the US Military Academy at West Point warned that "the wide availability of the protocols, procedures, and techniques necessary to produce and modify living organisms combined with an exponential increase in the availability of genetic data is leading to a revolution in science affecting the threat landscape that can be rivaled only by the development of the atomic bomb." One scenario prompting particular concern is a contagious virus created or modified by a terrorist group or other bad actor...
    The current COVID-19 pandemic, the largest public health crisis in a century, threatens the health of people across the globe. The U.S. has had the most diagnosed cases – surpassing 6 million – and more than 180,000 deaths. But six months into the pandemic, the U.S. still faces shortages of personal protective equipment for both front-line medical workers and the general public. There is also great need for widely available inexpensive, rapid tests; the infrastructure to administer them; and most importantly, safe, effective vaccines. Moving forward, medical innovation can play a substantial role in controlling and preventing infection – and treating those who have contracted the virus. But what’s the best way to catalyze and accelerate public health developments? Research and history show that the federal...
    Viral loads from coronavirus patients have been decreasing as the pandemic rages on, a new study suggests. Researchers found that just 25 percent of nasal swabs from hospitalized patients in April detected low levels of the virus. However, just five weeks later, nearly three-quarters of samples from patients had low viral loads - representing a 180 percent jump. What's more, the decline in viral loads was linked to a decrease in death rate. The team, from Wayne State University, in Detroit, Michigan, says it believes that as states implemented measures, such as social distancing and face mask mandates, the number of severe cases fell. A new study from Wayne State University found that 50% of hospitalized coronavirus patients were in...
    Florida schools reopened en masse, but a surge in coronavirus didnt follow, a USA TODAY analysis finds Walmart has reportedly picked 2 gas-station billionaire brothers as preferred bidders for Asda, its $8.4 billion UK grocery chain Misty Copeland on Her New Inclusive Kids Book and the Struggles of Being a Dancer in a Pandemic Like most performance-based industries, ballet is suffering during the COVID-19 pandemic. But prima ballerina Misty Copeland is still finding joy, this time with her new children's book. © Provided by People Under Armour Misty Copeland In an exclusive interview with PEOPLE, Copeland talks about the book, Bunheads, out Tuesday, which draws on her own life as a young ballerina. Copeland — who made ballet history...
    Illustration by Anurag Papolu/The Conversation The coronavirus forced the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary to break with tradition. In April, the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary did something unusual. For the previous 20 years, they had issued quarterly updates to announce new words and meanings selected for inclusion. These updates have typically been made available in March, June, September and December. In the late spring, however, and again in July, the dictionary’s editors released special updates, citing a need to document the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the English language. Although the editors have documented many coronavirus-related linguistic shifts, some of their observations are surprising. They claim, for example, that the pandemic has produced...
    Americans over 65 were excluded from half of all US clinical trials of drugs and all trials for vaccines - including those for COVID-19 - from October of last year until June 1, 2020, new research reveals.  People over 65 are the most likely to develop severe COVID-19 and die of the devastating viral infection.  Yet they have been systematically left behind 50 percent of the time as scientists tried experimental therapies in trials of drugs for any condition, including those for coronavirus, like remdesivir, which might have saved the lives of thousands of older Americans.  Older people were left out of 100 percent despite the fact that they will likely be the first Americans to receive a shot once...
    [The stream is slated to start at 11:30 a.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] The World Health Organization is holding a briefing Monday on the coronavirus pandemic, which has infected more than 33.1 million people worldwide and killed nearly 1 million, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. As the global death toll from the virus approaches 1 million people, the WHO said Friday that it's "not impossible" that number could double if countries don't uniformly work to suppress the virus' spread. "It's certainly unimaginable, but it's not impossible, because if we look at losing 1 million people in nine months and then we just look at the...
    SAN ANTONIO – With streaming services booming and cable getting more expensive, many people are choosing to cut the cord. But you don’t have to sacrifice news, weather and everything you love about local television. KSAT12′s Alyssa Medina talks to GMSA@9 and discusses the content that can be found on the KSAT-TV streaming app. To view the video, click above. You can download the free app onto your Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Firestick or Samsung smart TV, or even your cell phone by searching “KSAT-TV” on your compatible device.Read More: GMSA@9 Debrief: ‘KSAT Explains’ discusses search for COVID vaccine GMSA@9 Debrief: ‘KSAT Explains’ discusses how pandemic has struck San Antonio’s economy, road to recovery GMSA@9 Debrief: KSAT Explains return to...
    The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Dr Robert Redfield was overheard talking about new White House COVID-19 task force adviser Dr Scott Atlas in a phone call, saying 'everything he says is false'.  Redfield, who has previously been rebuked by President Trump for his less-rosy assessments of the COVID-19 recovery, was overheard talking to a colleague on the phone on a flight from Atlanta to Washington D.C. on Friday, NBC News reports.  During the call, Redfield could be heard expressing concern that Atlas - who is a late addition to the coronavirus task force - is sharing inaccurate information with Trump.  'Everything he says is false,' Redfield is reported to have said in the call.  Dr Robert...
    Military suicides have increased by as much as 20% this year compared to the same period in 2019, and some incidents of violent behavior have spiked as service members struggle under COVID-19, war-zone deployments, national disasters and civil unrest. While the data is incomplete and causes of suicide are complex, Army and Air Force officials say they believe the pandemic is adding stress to an already strained force. And senior Army leaders - who say they've seen about a 30% jump in active duty suicides so far this year - told The Associated Press that they are looking at shortening combat deployments. Such a move would be part of a broader effort to make the wellbeing of soldiers and their...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The head of a top U.S. government health agency gave a grim assessment of the coronavirus pandemic that contradicts that of President Donald Trump, saying "We're nowhere near the end," NBC News reported on Monday. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who has been rebuked by Trump for less-rosy assessments of the coronavirus recovery, also expressed concern that Trump's late addition to the coronavirus task force, Dr. Scott Atlas, is sharing inaccurate information with the president. "Everything he says is false," Redfield said in a telephone call Friday on a plane from Atlanta to Washington, NBC reported. Redfield later told NBC the threat from the coronavirus pandemic was far from over, contradicting...
    miodrag ignjatovic When it comes to investing decisions, there's a chance your financial advisor is helping save you from yourself. How? By accounting for the fact that, well, you're human. While they aren't exactly doing mind tricks, some advisors use behavioral finance techniques that may have helped protect clients from their own worst instincts during the early year market drop in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, a study suggests. And there are probably lessons there for do-it-yourself investors as well. More from Your Money Mindset:College kids worry about finances amid ongoing pandemicOp-ed: Non-profit sector needs the generosity of investorsAmericans are raiding retirement savings during pandemic "In general, it's about getting to know the client," said Omar Aguilar, chief investment...
    By Darrin Zammit Lupi TAL-OROQQ, Malta (Reuters) - Strangely, I can't clearly picture the face of the surgeon who changed my family's life. I'm not sure I'd recognize him if I bumped into him in the street. And yet I can vividly recall his face turning pale the instant he looked at the X-rays of my 14-year-old daughter's shoulder. Her chronic pain had first been diagnosed as a likely inflammation, and then possibly some problem in the muscle that could be fixed with a few physiotherapy sessions. But on that day, October 31, 2019, we found out that it was Ewing's Sarcoma, a rare and extremely aggressive form of bone cancer. The cancer had started deep in the sponge bone of her humerus...
    This article is reprinted by permission from NextAvenue.org. A year ago (was it only just a year ago?) I wrote these promising words in a Next Avenue article: In the next few months, thousands of northerners — so-called “snowbirds” — will escape their snowy, cold climates to spend the winter in warm, sunny spots in the southern or western part of the U.S. Thousands of northerners did, indeed escape to warmer climes for winter 2019-20. Then came 2020 and the pandemic. Due to the coronavirus, snowbirds are now rethinking, businesses are worrying, rental agencies are discounting, transportation services are marketing, and Chambers of Commerce are scrambling to find a path to recovery and normalcy. Snowbirds David and Debby Englander have spent their winters near...
    By The Associated Press NEW DELHI — India’s confirmed coronavirus tally reached 6 million cases on Monday, keeping the country second to the United States in number of reported cases since the pandemic began. The Health Ministry on Monday reported 82,170 new coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours, driving the overall tally to 60,74,703. At least 1,039 deaths were also recorded in the same period, taking total fatalities up to 95,542 since the pandemic began. New infections are in India are currently being reported faster than anywhere else in the world. The world’s second-most populous country is expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country in coming weeks, surpassing the U.S., where more than 7 million infections have been reported....
    NEW DELHI — India’s confirmed coronavirus tally reached 6 million cases on Monday, keeping the country second to the United States in number of reported cases since the pandemic began. The Health Ministry on Monday reported 82,170 new coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours, driving the overall tally to 60,74,703. At least 1,039 deaths were also recorded in the same period, taking total fatalities up to 95,542 since the pandemic began. New infections are in India are currently being reported faster than anywhere else in the world. The world’s second-most populous country is expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country in coming weeks, surpassing the U.S., where more than 7 million infections have been reported. Even as infections mount,...
    Mayor Bill de Blasio and NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza are facing calls to abdicate control of the nation's largest district after a union representing principals declared a unanimous vote of 'no confidence' in their handling of the coronavirus pandemic.  The stunning vote from the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators, which represents more than 6,400 education leaders in the Big Apple, came two days before schools are set to resume in-person learning for students in grades K through 8 on Tuesday. The union ripped into de Blasio and Carranza's 'failure to lead New York City through a safe and successful reopening of schools' and demanded that they hand over control of the district to state officials.  'CSA calls on Mayor...
    Well, this is perfect. A Trump campaign ad about how great Donald Trump is for the economy features inspiring footage of him in a hard hat, touring a steel plant … that laid off hundreds of workers this year. U.S. Steel’s Granite City, Illinois, plant laid off up to 737 workers in April as the coronavirus pandemic hit the auto industry, Vice reports. That was a fraction of U.S. Steel’s overall 2,700 layoffs, with more layoffs and furloughs threatened. “I feel very confident in President Trump’s ability to get our economy back to where it was, and even better,” a woman claiming to be a small business owner says in the ad. “Before the pandemic, our economy was the best it had...
    ATHENS (Reuters) - A male migrant died of COVID-19 on Sunday, the first reported death of an asylum seeker since the pandemic broke out in Greece in late February, a government official told Reuters. The 61-year-old Afghan, a father of two children, who lived at the migrant camp of Malakasa north of Athens, was treated and died at a hospital in Athens, the official said, adding that authorities were tracing his contacts. It was not immediately clear how long he had been at the hospital. The Malakasa camp, which hosts about 3,000 migrants, has been quarantined since Sept. 7 after positive tests for the new coronavirus. Many other migrant facilities in Greece have been sealed off or movement has been...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY SARAH E. FEINBERG To say it’s been a rough six months is an understatement; the COVID crisis is and remains a national nightmare. But for now, the smoke is starting to clear here in New York: schools are reopening, indoor dining is set to resume, and most importantly for us at Transit, riders are starting to return to the system in greater numbers. We’re inching closer to 2 million daily riders on the subway and holding steady at over 1 million on buses. This is great news. I hope you’re among those joining us. The truth is, if you...
    By The Associated Press MADRID — An association of families of coronavirus victims has planted what it says are 53,000 small Spanish flags in a Madrid park to honor the dead of the pandemic. Volunteers placed the flags on a grassy slope overlooking a highway in the capital early on Sunday. COVID-19 has claimed a confirmed 31,232 lives in Spain. But difficulties in testing at the start of the crisis mean many more victims likely have gone unrecorded. “I think it is a beautiful homage to the victims, a lot better than the homage that was given by the prime minister,” 62-year-old retiree Honorio Hernandez said. “I have been in the Arlington National Cemetery and this reminds me of that....
    Six topics over 90 minutes. That’s the game plan for the first of three debates between Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and President Trump. The topics for the Tuesday showdown -- which takes place at 9 p.m. ET live from Cleveland, Ohio -- are many of the biggest issues that have rocked the nation this year. DEBATE EXPECTATIONS: HAS TRUMP LOWERED THE BAR FOR BIDEN? Divided into six 15-minute segments, the topics were chosen by the debate moderator, "Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris Wallace. They were announced last week by the nonpartisan Commission on Presidential Debates. The Sheila and Eric Samson Pavilion, site of the first presidential debate, which is being hosted by Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland, Ohio The issues...
    Tennis: Birthday girl Halep sails through after slow start 50 things to pick up at the grocery store this fall How 2020 broke the housing market: So many homes are selling that we could run out of new houses in months © Provided by Business Insider A house is the most desirable get amid the coronavirus pandemic, but the US is barreling toward an inventory shortage and affordability crisis that'll make homeownership unattainable. John M Lund/Getty Images The hottest pandemic purchase is a house, as more and more Americans take advantage of low mortgage rates to attain spacious backyards and more comfortable work-from-home locales. Existing home sales, which have trended upward for the last 3 months since the...
    Sam FornasieroSam Fornasiero For an instant, luck seemed to change for Sam Fornasiero. The 21-year-old's phone call was put on hold — a noteworthy improvement relative to the 2,000-plus prior attempts to reach New Jersey's unemployment bureau, by his estimation. The call went dead after a half hour of waiting. But Fornasiero has gotten good at waiting. Furloughed from his job at a film-production company in New Jersey in April, Fornasiero has waited more than five months for jobless benefits to arrive. He expects to be recalled to work at some point but doesn't know when.  "Weeks turned into months," Fornasiero, a photographer by trade, said of the benefits delay. "I burned through what savings I had."Waiting gameFornasiero is one of thousands...
    Bill Gates, the Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist known for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation spoke to Fox News Sunday about the pandemic. Gates has been speaking about the coronavirus and vaccines in recent months. Talking to the outlet, Gates gave his idea of a timeline for the pandemic ending. He thinks that life will return to semi-normally by the summer of 2021, but the pandemic will end much later. “The end of the epidemic, best case, is probably 2022. But during 2021, the numbers, we should be able to drive them down, if we take the global approach,” Gates said on the program. “So, you know, thank goodness vaccine technology was there, that the funding came up, that...
    Nicole Karlis September 27, 2020 12:00PM (UTC) Dentists say they're seeing an uptick in teeth grinding since the pandemic. A Google Trends analysis showed a surge in searches related to panic attacks. Pandemic stress is said to be part of the drive behind an increase in calls to the National Eating Disorders Association over the last few months.  Indeed, it's no secret that the coronavirus pandemic is taking a toll on our mental health in ways that might not even be fully aware of yet. Now, there's also a newfound cohort of people who are struggling with "mask anxiety," a neologism meaning a fear of, or anxieties relating to, strapping a mask on your face. With pandemic restrictions in place, such...
    By KEITH SPERA, The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Years ago, Maple Leaf Bar owner Hank Staples had a brilliant idea: What if shows at the classic New Orleans music venue could be broadcast online? What if thousands of people around the world would pay $10 to, say, watch the Rebirth Brass Band’s weekly Tuesday night throwdown? “You could potentially have a worldwide audience,” Staples said recently, recounting the idea. “It would have changed the whole world for us.” Alas, Staples never got around to launching his online concert initiative. The start-up costs were too high and the technology was suspect. But six months into the coronavirus pandemic shutdown, Staples’ idea has become a reality. “Maple Leaf...
    By MARIA CLARK, USA Today - The American South NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A group of advocates in New Orleans have raised more than $400,000 to create what will be the city’s first home for transgender and gender non-confirming people who are experiencing homelessness. The project called the House of Tulip (Trans United Leading Intersectional Progress) is believed to be the first of its kind in the U.S., according to Mariah Moore, a co-director of the organization and a national organizer for the Transgender Law Center. The group is finalizing the purchase of a multi-unit home near the Treme neighborhood in downtown New Orleans that will provide living space for up to 12 people at a time. Moore explained that...
    China’s August Industrial Companies’ Profit Rises 19% on Year With Used-Car Demand Up, How to Get the Most When You Sell Most Americans don't know these lucrative Social Security "secrets" Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/12 SLIDES © shaferaphoto/istockphoto Over the 'Moon Few cultural traditions have escaped the coronavirus unscathed, and honeymoons are no exception. A study from Travelzoo and the wedding registry site Zola shows that like weddings themselves, honeymoons have been shaken up, for better or...
    Night Owls, a themed open thread, appears at Daily Kos seven days a week Arthur C. Brooks at The Atlantic writes—What to Do When the Future Feels Hopeless. Humans like to feel optimistic about and in control of where their life is headed. The pandemic has made it very hard to feel that way: [...] Because of the pandemic, the future feels difficult and uncertain, and few of us have much control over it, beyond doing our best to keep ourselves and those around us safe. [...]  Gallup survey data show that pessimism about the future of the pandemic in the U.S. is rising. This is infecting our general outlook: “I wake up every day with nothing to look forward to,” a friend...
    Mattea Kramer September 27, 2020 2:17AM (UTC) This piece originally appeared on TomDispatch. In our new era of nearly unparalleled upheaval, as a pandemic ravages the bodies of some and the minds of nearly everyone, as the associated economic damage disposes of the livelihoods of many, and as even the promise of democracy fades, the people whose lives were already on a razor's edge — who were vulnerable and isolated before the advent of Covid-19 — are in far greater danger than ever before. Against this backdrop, many of us are scanning the news for any sign of hope, any small flicker of light whose gleam could indicate that everything, somehow, is going to be okay. In fact, there is just such a flicker coming from...
    Oneita Thompson in a video on her Facebook page. From behind the walls of Philadelphia’s First United Methodist Church of Germantown, Oneita Thompson has read articles about the importance of mutual aid during the COVID-19 crisis and watched livestreams of the nationwide uprising as part of the Movement for Black Lives. Her internet connection is her only real contact with the outside world, and relying on mutual aid—in other words, the kindness of strangers—is currently her only means of survival. She posts her Cash app and Venmo and regularly circulates a number of online fundraisers. Currently, there are three: one for her son Clive “CJ” Thompson, a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient who was accepted into Columbia University...
    Dennis Quaid is slated to appear in President Trump's new $300million coronavirus awareness ad campaign that is scheduled to air ahead of the presidential election.  The Hollywood actor, who has previously voiced his support for the president, is among several celebrities who will participate in the Health and Human Services Department's 'defeat despair' commercials, addressing the COVID-19 pandemic. The project has been described by officials as an 'immediate surge in public advertising and awareness' and is being funded by money previously allocated to the CDC, Politico reported. Dennis Quaid is slated to appear in President Trump's new $300million coronavirus awareness ad campaign Quaid will be joined by gospel singer CeCe Winans, and the HHSD has...
    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The number of reported Arkansas coronavirus cases has topped 80,000 after the addition Saturday of 809 cases of the virus that causes COVID-19, the Arkansas Department of Health reported. Those new cases brought the state’s total caseload since tracking of the pandemic began in March to 80,755, including 2,495 probable cases. The actual number of cases in Arkansas is likely higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick. Active cases rose by 165 to 7,414. There also have been 19 COVID-19 deaths reported Saturday, bringing the state’s death toll to 1,285. Arkansas ranks third in the country for new cases per capita, according to...